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Old March 31, 2018   #1
Southbound
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Default Seedlings wilting

My seedlings had been looking pretty good for the last few weeks, but then here came the dreaded problem that I had last year. The leaves are suddenly turning under and curling up and the stems are drooping. It is not all the plants, but seems to be spreading. This happened last year, and I don't know if it was related, but after the plants were planted in the garden, we had a lot of blight and maybe other disease.
Anyone know how I might nip this in the bud? Thanks very much. I hope I have uploaded the pictures correctly!
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Old March 31, 2018   #2
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If you can share a bit more, it'll be easier to come up with possibilities.

What are you using for s grow medium? How wet is it? What's the temperature where your seedlings are? How are you providing light?

My initial thought is damping off, but without more info, it's just a guess.
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Old March 31, 2018   #3
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I think either damping off, except the stems look thick, or fungus gnat larvae. Also,they are purple so a bit too cold, I think. I use a pinch of gnatrol granules every time I plant out now. Insurance.
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Old March 31, 2018   #4
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Were they sitting in a tray of water? Looks cold and wet. I had a few extras last
Spring that did that. Droop from improper drainage. I wasn't paying attention
after a good rain soak...the tray, while I was hardening off, did not have drainage
and they sat in water for a couple days....yet they did bounce back.
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Old March 31, 2018   #5
Southbound
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Father'sDaughter View Post
If you can share a bit more, it'll be easier to come up with possibilities.

What are you using for s grow medium? How wet is it? What's the temperature where your seedlings are? How are you providing light?

My initial thought is damping off, but without more info, it's just a guess.
Thanks all for the feedback. To answer these questions: The grow medium was an organic mix-can't remember the exact one, I think it was Burpee's brand . Little seedlings took off really well, just now having a problem -most plants are 3 or more inches tall. I am trying not to over water- I have a hard time telling when or when not to water, but seems to me the best way is picking up the pot and feeling the weight of it indicates whether it needs water or not, may not be the best method, but I can't tell by just looking at the soil. As far as temp. , I have kept them in garage, mostly has been 60-70 degrees lately in there. Have them under 4' LED flourescent lights, about 16 hours a day. If this is "damping off" are there any solutions? Thanks very much for any advice!
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Old April 1, 2018   #6
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I think you need to let them dry out a bit, just stop watering for several days and if possible get them outdoors for some natural light in a sheltered place. Both of those strategies can help with fungus gnats as well, if that is the root of the problem. You might want to pick up some mosquito dunks or gnatrol for the next time you water. I like to touch the soil surface with my finger to see whether it's dry or not. Many times it looks dry but when I touch it I find the damp is still there just a little below the surface...

What kind of LED's are you using? A number of people (including me!) have had trouble with the single spectrum shoplight LED's this season, which doesn't seem to meet tomatoes' light requirements. Natural light is the cure for that too...
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Old April 1, 2018   #7
Southbound
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Quote:
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I think you need to let them dry out a bit, just stop watering for several days and if possible get them outdoors for some natural light in a sheltered place. Both of those strategies can help with fungus gnats as well, if that is the root of the problem. You might want to pick up some mosquito dunks or gnatrol for the next time you water. I like to touch the soil surface with my finger to see whether it's dry or not. Many times it looks dry but when I touch it I find the damp is still there just a little below the surface...

What kind of LED's are you using? A number of people (including me!) have had trouble with the single spectrum shoplight LED's this season, which doesn't seem to meet tomatoes' light requirements. Natural light is the cure for that too...
I will try that, thanks. I'm using led flourescents from Costco. I did set them outside yesterday, and they seem to look a good bit better today. I'm ready to get them in the ground but Spring seems to be slow in coming this year! Thanks everyone.
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Old April 2, 2018   #8
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Yep that is the same LED from Costco that I had trouble with. Apparently tomatoes need more of a full spectrum. Daylight should fix the problem.
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Old April 2, 2018   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southbound View Post
Thanks all for the feedback. To answer these questions: The grow medium was an organic mix-can't remember the exact one, I think it was Burpee's brand . Little seedlings took off really well, just now having a problem -most plants are 3 or more inches tall. I am trying not to over water- I have a hard time telling when or when not to water, but seems to me the best way is picking up the pot and feeling the weight of it indicates whether it needs water or not, may not be the best method, but I can't tell by just looking at the soil. As far as temp. , I have kept them in garage, mostly has been 60-70 degrees lately in there. Have them under 4' LED flourescent lights, about 16 hours a day. If this is "damping off" are there any solutions? Thanks very much for any advice!

Using weight as a guide to how much water it needs is the best way imo. If all cups use same mix just a quick compare can tell you which need more or less water.

Did you add any fertilizer or so recently? Damping off is easy to see at the base of the plant where it meets the soil. If it seems dark color or thinnedit's damping off. I'm inclined to think it isn't though. Not sure what it is. I'd use a different mix next year in any case.
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Old April 2, 2018   #10
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Did you add any fertilizer or so recently? Damping off is easy to see at the base of the plant where it meets the soil. If it seems dark color or thinnedit's damping off. I'm inclined to think it isn't though. Not sure what it is. I'd use a different mix next year in any case.[/QUOTE]

Yes, I've been using Monty's 4-15-12 liquid every other watering or so. I have seen that "thinness" at the base on some plants in years past and wondered what that was. I don't think that's the case this year. If it did happen to be damping off, is there anything that can be done? Also, is gnatrol available at garden centers? Thanks very much.
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Old April 2, 2018   #11
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There might be too much fertilizer accumulated from each watering. You could try washing a few plants as a test. Just water well for the water to run from the bottom, and set them somewhere where it's breezy and warm to not sit wet for too long.
You see gnats flying around in case they are present before doing anything about it. If all fails just take the plant, wash the soil and put it in new potting mix, preferably something different to be sure. In case it is an early case of damping off however, even moving won't probably help.
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