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Old July 31, 2017   #1
nickel plate
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Default Is there a better way to cut blanched corn kernels off the cob?

How do you cut blanched corn kernels off of the cob? I'm new to the process and just did eighty+ ears freezer bagged. Standing the cobs on end, I tried two different types of knives, a standard blade and a serrated blade-both very sharp. The serrated blade seemed to work better but in both cases the cuts were somewhat erratic at times leaving the partial kernel bases still on the cob.
Do I need to learn the correct way to use the knife or is there another recommended type of mechanical device that I need to know about and purchase?
My next larger patch of corn is due to come off in two weeks.
Thanks for your suggestions in advance.
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Old July 31, 2017   #2
imp
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I used to do mine the same way and it's just a knife that works for you and practice at keeping it close to the cob.

If there are partial kernels left, as you get better at cutting, save those cobs aside and scrape a spoon down them into a pan- this is how you get the juice for creamed corn. Also good added into a good chicken stock, or add to a casserole dish, or even for the famous creamed corn!

I often use a mandolin when I was making creamed corn to take the 1/2 kernels off the cobs.

There are those round ring things you slide down the ears, but they never worked well for me.
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Old July 31, 2017   #3
Barbee
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There is a tool that will cut it off for you. You just circle the ear and run it down. I still use a knife but learned a few years ago to use a bundt pan. Set the cob in the center hole and the corn goes right in the pan.
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Old July 31, 2017   #4
dmforcier
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Personally, my own self - and this is just me - I use my teeth. A little butter for lube...
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Old July 31, 2017   #5
ddsack
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I've tried various knives, including fish filet knifes of various kinds. I like the serrated ones best because I can use them to scrape off the remnants of the lower kernels after the initial slice. There was one knife that was mostly smooth, but had about an inch of jagged teeth near the base. That one was just about perfect, but the fishermen in the family seem to have lost it.
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Old July 31, 2017   #6
kurt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmforcier View Post
Personally, my own self - and this is just me - I use my teeth. A little butter for lube...
Thanx I was hesitant to say,"hey just eat it".Wife has a long curved like a banana foot long really thin sharp knife that she can render stood on end with a four pronged fork.Sucking on the core (mind you this done fresh pick)at this time is heaven.The kernel goes in the freezer for fresh freeze.
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Old July 31, 2017   #7
SueCT
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I hope you are using the leftover cobs for corn stock. Reduced enough, then frozen, it makes for really sweet tasty corn soup in the winter. I use a lot more cobs to water ratio than this calls for and reduce it until it tastes nice and sweet and "corny", then make the rest of the recipe with it. It is REALLY good. But I am also a fan of Chipotle.

My favorite recipe (from the Heirloom Vegetable Cookbook, Ridge, Kilmer-Purcell):

SMOKY ROASTED CORN SOUP WITH CHIPOTLE CHILE

3 ears corn, husked
1 poblano pepper, cut into ¼-inch dice
1 small red bell pepper, cut into ¼-inch dice
2 T. olive oil
3 cups water
2 T. unsalted butter
½ cup finely chopped red onion
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
¼ t. chipotle chile powder
¾ t. coarse (kosher) salt
½ cup heavy cream
DIRECTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Using a chef’s knife, scrape the corn kernels off the cobs onto a rimmed baking sheet; reserve the cobs. Add the poblano and bell pepper to the baking sheet, drizzle with the oil, and roast for 25 minutes, tossing the vegetables once or twice, until the corn is lightly browned.

Meanwhile, cut the cobs into thirds crosswise and place in a medium saucepan with the water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook for 20 minutes, or until the liquid is flavorful. Strain the corn broth into a bowl.

In a large saucepan, heat the butter over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 7 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onion is tender. Add the roasted corn and pepper mixture, the corn broth, chipotle powder, and salt and simmer for 5 minutes for the flavors to blend. Add the cream and gently heat. Serve hot.

Last edited by SueCT; July 31, 2017 at 11:40 PM.
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Old July 31, 2017   #8
clkeiper
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Really, the easiest is cutting it off raw and then cooking it. trust me. works much better. then cook it just until the color goes from opaque to clear no matter whether it is white, yellow or bicolor and then measure it into 1/2 servings per bag of how many you normally feed for dinner and then freeze it. I use a corn zipper. it is the best tool I have found so far.
https://www.amazon.com/Kuhn-Rikon-22.../dp/B001UOCYLI
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Old August 1, 2017   #9
dmforcier
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That corn soup sounds good. And easy! Thanks.
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Old August 1, 2017   #10
Rajun Gardener
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Yes, use the zipper.
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Old August 1, 2017   #11
oakley
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That tool looks great.

I have been putting a small bowl upside down inside a big
stainless mixing bowl and cut resting the ear on the butt of the small bowl. Big bowl
contains the kernels. Back of the knife I scrape for the 'milk'.

Soup looks good. I add a small-medium diced potato and celery. Take a cup out and
blend/puree, then add back instead of heavy cream... And lots of
garlic. Starting with a good veg stock I don't miss the milk. Don't usually have milk,
just plain yogurt.

Just recently started buying poblanos regularly. Such good flavor over regular green
bells I never buy. I took a half dozen on my recent trip and they lasted for the entire
month. Fantastic in chowders.
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Old August 1, 2017   #12
SueCT
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The potatoes are a good idea, I have thought about adding some anyway. I prefer to stick to pure corn stock though, rather than a generic mixed vegetable stock, because it gives it a nice sweet, "corny" flavor rather the flavor of of a vegetable soup with corn in it. I am certain you can make unlimited variations that would all be very good.
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Old August 1, 2017   #13
Rajun Gardener
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You can use the spent cobs to make vegan honey/corn cob jelly. You'll be amazed that it taste just like honey.
https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/corncob-jelly
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Old August 1, 2017   #14
oakley
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Corn cob Jelly!? Sounds amazing. Never knew that one existed.

I should have mentioned I use leek top stock. Marked separate from my usual veg stock.
Just leek tops, garlic, onion, celery, whole seeds of peppercorn, coriander, etc. No carrot
or other veg.

I use it for all chowders, fish etc. Very mild but flavorful.

I've been out of the country without fresh corn so getting excited about it seeing this
thread.
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Old August 1, 2017   #15
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Chuck the ears up in a wood lathe at one thousand rounds per minute.
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