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Information and discussion about canning and dehydrating tomatoes and other garden vegetables and fruits. DISCLAIMER: SOME RECIPES MAY NOT COMPLY WITH CURRENT FOOD SAFETY GUIDELINES - FOLLOW AT YOUR OWN RISK

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Old March 2, 2010   #61
stormymater
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HOT & Tasty Pepper Sauce


I make this with whatever red peppers I have ready - Cayenne-types, Kung Paos, red Jalapenos & Serranos, Fish, Marconis, etc. A mixture seems to balance the flavors better. Awesome with NC BBQ, grilled salmon, fried chicken, in potato salad... on a spoon... FTR, have NOT used Habaneros in this mix... yet...

8-10 Half pint jars

Ingredients
  • 4 cups hot peppers, measure after being chopped in food processor
  • 1/4 lbs garlic, peeled, coarsely processed with the peppers
  • 4 cups white vinegar
  • 1 1/3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 cup sweet red pepper, coarsely ground(Optional)
  • 1 T kosher salt
Directtions
  1. Combine vinegar, sugar & salt over medium heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves, bring to a boil and boil 5 minutes.
  2. Add hot peppers and garlic,also add sweet red pepper if using.
  3. Bring to a boil and boil 5 minutes.
  4. Fill to within 1" of the top of the jar with the pepper/garlic mixture. Fill with boiling sugar/vinegar mixture to within 1/4" of the top of the jar.
  5. Release air bubbles, ensure the rim is clean and seal the jars.
  6. Let the peppers rest for 2 weeks and you will enjoy.

Last edited by stormymater; March 2, 2010 at 08:48 PM. Reason: made a mess of my cut 'n paste
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Old October 10, 2010   #62
pdxwindjammer
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Default Safely Canning Salsa Verde??

I would like to can some salsa verde. I usually roast the veggies and slightly char them and just eat it fresh. I have not found any recipes that say to broil the veggies first so I am wondering if doing this would make it somehow unsafe to can? I can in a pressure cooker but want to know if I can char the veggies.

Thanks in advance!
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Old October 11, 2010   #63
RinTinTin
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The main principal of 'canning' is to destroy the various bacteria that will cause your food to spoil. By pre-broiling, you have already destroyed some/most/all of the bacteria in question. I am no expert in food-safety, but I cannot imagine how it could harm the process. You could probably reduce the canning time (but I will not suggest that) since you have already 'neutralized' a portion of your enemy before you begin canning. Pre-broiling will just add that wonderful charred flavor that makes salsa 'SALSA'.
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Old October 11, 2010   #64
TomNJ
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The cooking method itself is not an issue, but the acidity is. Can you post the full recipe, especially how much acidity is added, such as vinegar, lemon juice, or citric acid?

TomNJ
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Old October 11, 2010   #65
pdxwindjammer
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Thanks! Here is a link to the salsa verde recipe.

http://robbingpeter.wordpress.com/20...t-salsa-verde/
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Old October 11, 2010   #66
pdxwindjammer
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Oops! This is the actual link and it contains the reply from the guy who posted the recipe.

http://www.stevechatterton.com/canni...tml#comment-62
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Old October 11, 2010   #67
RinTinTin
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It was stated that a pressure canner was being used. That is the recommended method for non-acidic recipes, as the higher heat is needed to kill bacteria that is more abundant on non-acidic recipes.
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Old October 12, 2010   #68
remy
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Not sure what you saw RinTinTin, but it said they used a boiling water canner.

Charring the veggies will not harm the recipe. Lowering the amount of vinegar and lime juice, or upping the amount of veggies will. It is important to follow quantities stated. Within the realm of veggies, you can vary the amounts as long as the whole amount remains the same e.g. less onion more pepper.
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Old October 12, 2010   #69
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The original post in this thread said 'using pressure canner'.
That makes a huge difference. Boiling water will not safely work for non-acidic recipes; steam/pressure will.

My original post was prior to the recipe link being posted.
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Old October 12, 2010   #70
remy
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Sorry, RinTinTin, I though you meant the linked recipe.

Though not necessary, pressure canning will work for boiling water canner recipes.
It does NOT work the other way around. You can not do a pressure canning recipe in a boiling water canner.
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Old October 12, 2010   #71
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I can stuff all of the time...I find that adding unwanted acid for the sake of preservation really harms the flavor. Just make sure you boil or steam the can for 20 full minutes immediately after canning, and before use. I believe that would eliminate most nasty microbes. Of course if the can swells, throw it away. Just give it a good cooking beforehand and all will be good. I want some tomatillos for next season!
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Old October 12, 2010   #72
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While I am not a food safety expert, the recipe you posted looks like it contains enough acid to be safe with pressure canning.

Keep in mind that botulism spores laugh at boiling water baths - it would take a full day of boiling to kill them at only 212 degrees. Pressure canning raises the temperature to 240F which kills the spores in a matter of minutes (plus the time it takes for the temperature to penetrate to the center of the jar).

I add citric acid to my canned salsa (1/4 tsp per pint), which I find has no adverse effect on taste. Vinegar and lemon/lime juice also work, but it takes a lot more to lower the pH to safe levels.

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Old October 12, 2010   #73
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Just wondered if pre-roasting/charring would cause density issues. That is as much a concern as pH values or altitude. heirloomdaddy, I feel it is much more responsible to follow approved canning guidelines and avoid the possibility of bulging cans or improper seals, especially if the food is to be shared with others.
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Old October 12, 2010   #74
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I have several books on canning, pickling, etc. One book is full of very old recipes which I would never use 'as-is'. They were written prior to the newer discoveries in food safety. Some are obviously not up to today's standards.
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Old September 21, 2011   #75
recruiterg
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I have never used pickle crisp.

Quote:
Originally Posted by barryla61 View Post
How do you prevent your salsa from being watery?
You need to add some salt to the tomatoes, then drain them in a colander in my opinion.

I like to peel the tomatoes, add onion and pickling salt and let the mixture sit overnight. Then drain and add more ingredients like vinegar, jalapeno, spices. The veggies get broken down and don't remain crisp, though.
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