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Old March 27, 2018   #1
gimmieToms
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Default Peat pots. Yes or No?

I’ve never actually used peat pots before, as I’m not convinced that the roots will get through properly. However, I have one particular variety of tomato that, no matter how gentle I am, ALWAYS gets transplant shock, even when all the others are fine. It’s a delicate little muffin, although always seems to bounce back. I was wondering if peat pots will be a viable option to try and avoid the shock.
I generally start my seeds in a peat pellet, transplant in to plastic cups at around 2 weeks after sprouting, then in to large containers in the garden at the end of may.
What are your recommendations?
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Old March 27, 2018   #2
brownrexx
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I hate peat pots and never use them. The roots never seem to get through mine. Why not start your seeds in a larger container in the first place to avoid transplanting at 2 weeks?

I start my seeds in those plastic cell pots and they do not get transplanted for at least a month when they go into 4" pots. After that they go into the ground.
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Old March 27, 2018   #3
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I don't like them either. They dry out 2-3 times faster than the plastic starter pots. When planting them in the ground, you must remember to remove the top edge of the pot to the ground level or they will dry out and suck out moisture. I quit buying them, no matter how low the price at the end of the season sales.

I start my tomatoes in 1 quart milk carton, cut down to about 6-7 inches high. They never need to be transplanted to a larger container, develop nice root systems, and I just tear the carton apart when it is time to put them into the ground.
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Old March 27, 2018   #4
GrowingCoastal
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They either dry out or grow mold up the sides. No.
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Old March 27, 2018   #5
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I love peat pots.
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Old March 27, 2018   #6
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I hate peat pots.

For melons and zukes that hate to be transplanted, I make newspaper pots, making sure to bury the whole thing. They work great

Linda
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Old March 27, 2018   #7
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I say no. I don't like them.
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Old March 27, 2018   #8
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They are a waste of money.
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Old March 27, 2018   #9
SueCT
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Big no to Peat Pots for me. I tried them, they dried out too fast, delicate new roots cannot get through them and I ended up having to peel it off and that was more traumatic to the roots. AND they grow mold. I second the starting that one in a bigger container so you don't have to disturb the roots when transplanting.
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Old March 27, 2018   #10
gimmieToms
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brownrexx View Post
I hate peat pots and never use them. The roots never seem to get through mine. Why not start your seeds in a larger container in the first place to avoid transplanting at 2 weeks?

I start my seeds in those plastic cell pots and they do not get transplanted for at least a month when they go into 4" pots. After that they go into the ground.
I transplant when they have two sets of true leaves so I can transplant them deeper and get a better root system. They’re already in the pellets right now, so too late to try that anyway. Perhaps I will try some like that next year.
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Old March 27, 2018   #11
gimmieToms
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OK, thanks everyone. I won’t bother with the peat pots then. I’ll keep to the plastic.
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Old March 27, 2018   #12
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Gimme- do you remove the netting before transplanting from the pellets to the plastic cups?
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Old March 27, 2018   #13
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As a rule, I don't like peat pots.. not porous enough, too prone to get moldy, etc..

That said, I have found them useful in some situations... although it's rare. I have found that they make watering early starts easy, since you can just sit them in a tray full of water and they'll soak it up. When I have used them, I make sure I cut plenty of holes in the sides in order to allow roots to go through.

Having said THAT, I've completely switched from using peat pots to using 'Cow Pots'. If I'm going to use pots pressed out of something, might as well make it something that benefits the plant and soil, right?
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Old March 27, 2018   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
Gimme- do you remove the netting before transplanting from the pellets to the plastic cups?
Yes, always.
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Old March 27, 2018   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gimmieToms View Post
Yes, always.
OK, that's right then.
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