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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #16
ContainerTed
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I was raised up in Bristol, and had never heard of "Greasy Beans". Down here just north of Knoxville, my neigbors all asked me to grow them, and I did. My problem with them was that the danged Japanese Beetles insisted on defoliating them. The ones I had were surely a dwarf variety. They only got to about 18 inches tall on average. But, they really loaded up.

I think that there are a lot of places like East Tennessee and Western North Carolina that have "regional" favorites. My brother is like you. There's only one bean to grow and that is the White Half Runners. In the last ten years, I've grown maybe 30 or so different varieties and they all taste good to me. I especially liked the Rattlesnake variety. Turkey Craw and Kentucky Wonder were excellent as well.

Take care neighbor.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #17
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I have lots of runner beans, but not the ones you mention.

A U.S. company is selling a mixed packet which might be useful and economical for you.

https://www.adaptiveseeds.com/produc...h-pop-organic/

This is their description: Phaseolus coccineus. Mix. 70-90 days.

A genetically diverse population of edible-pod type runner beans from the British Isles. We have loved growing runner beans from across the pond for some time now and with so many good ones in our trials, we decided to let the best coalesce into one big British Pop mix. Our favorites in this crossed- up mix are Tenderstar, Prizewinner, White Emergo, and Polestar. We have selected for vigor, yield, long pods, and a diversity of seed coat color – a rainbow of lavender pastels, black, white, tan, and speckles that are hard to describe. While the long and tender green pods are the main crop for this variety, the fresh shelled and dry beans themselves are also delicious. Since they are more tolerant of cooler weather conditions than common beans, they may grow back as a “perennial vegetable” if the ground doesn’t freeze too deeply in winter.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #18
Tormato
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In general terms...


Phaseolus vulgaris = "common" bean


Phaseolus coccineus = "runner" bean



The confusion is where a common bean can be a (general terms again) "bush", "half runner", or "pole" (with "pole" sometimes called "runner").


I've begun to list beans at the MMMM thread, for the few participants who've been patiently waiting. I've started with "common" "bush" beans.



"Common" beans of "half runner" and "pole" habit will be listed next.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #19
salix
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So Gary, is it in fact true that the P. vulgaris varieties are pretty well self-pollinating and that seed saving is straightforward? And that P. coccineum requires insect or hummingbird pollination and must be grown somewhat in isolation for seed saving purposes? (or is this something not true that has been lodged in my brain for too long?)
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #20
ContainerTed
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Salix, a bag of Blue Lake seed costs about 7 bucks at the local Co-op. With that kind of pricing, I can easily afford to buy new seed every year. Takes all the stress out of wondering if the new "seeds" will give the right plants. Some things are just not worth the "stress".

I have one recommendation that I can comfortably give. "Fields" seeds are as good as seeds get and the prices and shipping are great. I've had time to really judge whether or not seed suppliers can deliver the correct stuff. I do not give my approval lightly. Regardless of what we pay, we really want the variety to be the correct one.

Take care and hug your love ones before they aren't there to hug.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #21
LDiane
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salix View Post
P. coccineum requires insect or hummingbird pollination and must be grown somewhat in isolation for seed saving purposes?
I don't isolate them in the garden as I'm just growing for myself so don't mind a bit of hybridization.

I made the mistake one winter of growing some runners in the greenhouse and got no beans from them at all as of course there were no pollinators.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salix View Post
So Gary, is it in fact true that the P. vulgaris varieties are pretty well self-pollinating and that seed saving is straightforward? And that P. coccineum requires insect or hummingbird pollination and must be grown somewhat in isolation for seed saving purposes? (or is this something not true that has been lodged in my brain for too long?)

P. vulgaris are pretty well self-pollinating. I average about 1 in 250 saved seeds crossing (0.4%). Some varieties appear to be more promiscuous than others, with Jeminez being a stand-out.



I have no knowledge, yet, of P. coccineum's requirements for pollination or isolation. Some day, I'll look into it.


Lima beans are known to readily cross. So, I request that participants in the swap trial only one variety, or isolate.



I've yet to explore requirements for soy, yardlong, adzuki, etc...
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ContainerTed View Post
Salix, a bag of Blue Lake seed costs about 7 bucks at the local Co-op. With that kind of pricing, I can easily afford to buy new seed every year. Takes all the stress out of wondering if the new "seeds" will give the right plants. Some things are just not worth the "stress".

I have one recommendation that I can comfortably give. "Fields" seeds are as good as seeds get and the prices and shipping are great. I've had time to really judge whether or not seed suppliers can deliver the correct stuff. I do not give my approval lightly. Regardless of what we pay, we really want the variety to be the correct one.

Take care and hug your love ones before they aren't there to hug.


All the money in the world can't buy seed that no one has in stock. With beans, there have been many times where someone has posted this problem somewhere on the web.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tormato View Post
All the money in the world can't buy seed that no one has in stock. With beans, there have been many times where someone has posted this problem somewhere on the web.
I agree with you. But in the case of Blue Lake 274, even the seed displays at Walmart have my favorite in small quantities.

I always plant enough beans to make two rows about 12-18 apart and with seeds every 3-5 inches in each of the rows. I normally buy a bag of seeds that will give me that ability. I do all my beans, peas, and okra this way and gives me excellent harvest quantities.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #25
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Blue Lake 274 shouldn't be a problem to find. I think Kentucky Wonder and Contender are about the only varieties I see even more of.



And, Cntender is the only bean variety (out of hundreds) I do not recommend to try.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #26
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I've listed most of my collection over at the 2018 Mostly Mystery 'Mater Mailing thread. I don't know if any of the runner beans are short vine varieties.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #27
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Interesting discussion.
To my understanding, runner beans do well in the cool PNW, Enland like climate. I planted someo torp their flower, when i was up there. They produce huge pods, as shown in one of the posts above. Pole beaans, also grown as ornamentall. They produce thin small beans.
I am going to grow some bush type garden beans. I think it is some kind of Kentuckfy Blue lake.
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