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Old January 1, 2019   #1
RandyG
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Default 'Mountain Gem' F1 hybrid tomato

A new hybrid named 'Mountain Gem' is now available from Seedway and in small amounts from Twilley Seeds. It is determinate, homozygous for the crimson gene (ogc), with very large fruit. Interior color is uniform bright red, and flavor is good for a firm-fruited, high yielding, determinate type with concentrated fruit set. Disease resistances incude verticillium wilt (Ve), fusarium wilt races 1 and 2 (I, I-2), TSWV (Sw-5), tomato mosaic virus (Tm-2), and late blight (Ph-2 + Ph-3 combined). It has shown wide adaptability and is adapted for home garden, local market, and large scale commercial production for both conventional and organic culture.

The combination of good horticultural traits and wide disease resistances should make it useful for those doing further breeding.
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Old January 1, 2019   #2
rhines81
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There was no mention of taste (flavor is good for a firm-fruited, doesn't cut it) in the above? I would think that to be a very important attribute??
What is the heritage of this new hybrid? Garden Gem? Mountain Fresh?
"Firm fruited", to me, sounds more like a paste tomato.
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Old January 2, 2019   #3
RandyG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhines81 View Post
There was no mention of taste (flavor is good for a firm-fruited, doesn't cut it) in the above? I would think that to be a very important attribute??
What is the heritage of this new hybrid? Garden Gem? Mountain Fresh?
"Firm fruited", to me, sounds more like a paste tomato.
The nouns flavor and taste are synonyms. I prefer to use the word flavor in describing tomatoes and taste in reference to the character of people. "Good taste' refers to the admirable character trait of people who respond to others politely.
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Old January 3, 2019   #4
SeanInVa
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The nouns flavor and taste are synonyms. I prefer to use the word flavor in describing tomatoes and taste in reference to the character of people. "Good taste' refers to the admirable character trait of people who respond to others politely.
I think Rhines' question was fair, however could have been posed in a much friendlier manner.

In any case, I am under the impression, Randy, that this is a variety you've developed?

Quote:
The combination of good horticultural traits and wide disease resistances should make it useful for those doing further breeding.
This has me intrigued. However, I am unable to find this cultivar on the Seedway website either via searching, or browsing. You wouldn't happen to have a link to the product page would you?
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Old January 3, 2019   #5
RandyG
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Yes, 'Mountain Gem' is a release from my continued emeritus tomato breeding through NCSU and just came on the market. Seedway has the seed for sale, but it did not make it into their catalog product listing for 2019. Twilley Seeds has information listed for it at their product website.
I am concentrating now on specialty types of different sizes, shapes and colors, mostly indeterminate types with multiple disease reistances, improved flavor and shelf life but have contiuned limited breeding on the regular round, determinate hybrids of the type released during my career at NCSU. 'Mountain Gem' is homozygous for the crimson gene and has excellent color. Brix has been as high or higher than that of 'Tasti Lee' with a good balance of acids and sugar. Everyone who has tried it has commented favorably on its flavor (taste) for a high yielding, determinate type with concentrated fruit set and firm fruit. People who have canned and processed it in other ways have been very happy with the results.
I suggest taking a look at it to see how it fits into your growing needs, especially for those growing for market. It is a definite improvement over the other late blight resistant determinate hybrids that have come on the market over the last few years. Because of the university restrictions on free release of breeding lines, I am not in position to make the parental lines openly available, but other breeders can self the hybrid and develop their own lines, which is really the exciting part of tomato breeding. I think they willl find useful material coming out of this hybrid, especially those who are now taking advantage of molecular markers to identify the disease resistance genes in lines they are developing.
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Old January 3, 2019   #6
rhines81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyG View Post
Brix has been as high or higher than that of 'Tasti Lee' with a good balance of acids and sugar. Everyone who has tried it has commented favorably on its flavor (taste) for a high yielding, determinate type with concentrated fruit set and firm fruit. People who have canned and processed it in other ways have been very happy with the results.
Hmm, excuse me if you didn't think I was polite enough ... it's all in how you read things I guess. I just wanted much more information than what was contained in the post.
Seems like it might be balanced enough, perhaps on the sweet side of life, at least that is a little better description of what to expect. I am growing both Mountain Fresh and Mountain Magic so I was curious as to how this might compare to either of those (taste, size, growth, production).
In visiting the website (Twilley Seeds), it looks like this one may be about the same size, if not slightly larger, than Mountain Fresh? 75 days and fairly compact (~3 ft in height). It does go on to say "nearly unique flavor quality" ~ which still leaves me wondering on the parentage or least what tomato is being improved on by the making of this hybrid. The site also says "meaty, thick flesh", so would you describe this as a slicer or a paste?
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Old January 3, 2019   #7
RandyG
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'Mountain Gem' was crossed to incorporate late blight , verticillium and fusarium wilt, TSWV, and TomV resistances into a large fruited determinate tomato with the crimson gene homozygous for increased lycopene and desirable bright red interior color. The TSWV (Sw-5 gene), tomato mosaic virus resistance (Tm-2 gene), Ve gene, I and I-2 genes, and crimson (ogc gene) come from a line (NC 4GEM) I developed from selfing the F1 hybrid Primo Red. The Ph-2 + Ph-3 genes for late blight resistance in the other parent (NC 1GEM) come from my NC 1CELBR line, which is a parent in Mountain Merit and some other commercial seed company hybrids. NC 1CELBR was crossed with a parent line of 'Mountain Majesty' , NC 1CS, which has the crimson gene and this hybrid was selfed to develop the NC 1GEM. NC 1GEM also has the Ve, I, and I-2 genes so 'Mountain Gem' is homozygous for these three genes. The cross to make 'Mountain Gem' is NC 4GEM x NC 1GEM.

After I released the crimson hybrid 'Mountain Majesty', I wanted to increase disease resistances in a new crimson hybrid to add late blight and ToMV resistances. 'Mountain Gem' is more compact in growth habit than 'Mountain Fresh' and Mountain Majesty' , slightly earlier in maturity with more concentrated fruit set, and has fruit as large or larger than the other two hybrids. As I mentioned in my post before this one, 'Mountain Gem' has been as high or higher in brix than 'Tasti-Lee' with equal or superior taste based on different people tasting it from several plantings. I classify it as a firm fruited slicer tomato. One grower who sells his off grade fruit to people to can, said everyone who bought 'Mountain Gem' came back and wanted only that variety for canning.

Developing superior flavor in determinate plants with concentrated fruit set, large fruit size, high yield, and firm texture is extremely difficult because it goes against what these types are able to do from a physiological standpoint. I am working toward a lot of new indeterminate hybrids with various fruit sizes, shapes, and colors that have much better flavor than the determinate types plus multiple disease resistances and will be releasing those in the future. One hybrid I developed with very good taste and texture is the pink fruited hybrid, 'Mountain Rouge'. It is the cross of my NC 161L line x 'Pink Brandywine' and has VF, nematode, and late blight resistances. It is suited mainly for home garden and local market production because it is susceptible to radial fruit cracking.

I hope you will try 'Mountain Gem' to see how it suits your needs and performs in your area. I always advise growers to do limited trials of new varieties until they are satisfied that they are superior to what they are already growing. Please let me know if you have other questions.
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Old January 3, 2019   #8
AKmark
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I am excited to try this, thanks for sharing this information. Looking forward to the inderterminates too, I would love to trial some in greenhouses in AK.
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Old January 3, 2019   #9
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Great information Randy, thank you! I haven't heard Primo Red mentioned in years. I had a friend in NJ that grew that many years ago. Also, the Mountain Rouge sounds very interesting.
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Old January 4, 2019   #10
Greatgardens
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Hi Dr. Gardner-

I have a question you can probably answer. What is the status of varieties with resistance to Septoria? Of the disease resistant hybrids that have been released (Stellar, Iron Lady, etc.), a couple suggest "intermediate resistance" to Septoria. Any versions coming that you are aware of that have good resistance to Septoria?

Thanks,
GG
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Old January 7, 2019   #11
RandyG
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Hi Dr. Gardner-

I have a question you can probably answer. What is the status of varieties with resistance to Septoria? Of the disease resistant hybrids that have been released (Stellar, Iron Lady, etc.), a couple suggest "intermediate resistance" to Septoria. Any versions coming that you are aware of that have good resistance to Septoria?

Thanks,
GG
Martha Mutschler at Cornell is continuing to work on breeding Septoria resistance into tomatoes and released the lines that were used as parents in the hybrids you mentioned. Septoria has become more severe over the years and in my observations is more destructive than early blight because of the rapid defoliation of plants. One of the problems with Septoria resistance is that varieties that have resistance can be overwhelmed by the disease spores from susceptible varieties if grown in close proximity. Other diseases that are becoming more severe under non-sprayed condtions are powdery mildew and leaf mold, even when plants are grown in tunnels to keep rain out. Breeding to reduce or eliminate chemical sprays for control is difficult because diseases that were previously controlled by broad spectrum fungicides become severe in the absence of chemical sprays.
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Old January 7, 2019   #12
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Mountain Gem sounds like a great combination of traits, thanks for posting about it.
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Old January 8, 2019   #13
Nan_PA_6b
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I've had some varieties that soldiered on through Septoria, continuing to produce and grow new healthy leaves: Dr. Carolyn (didn't seem to be affected much at all), Dotson's Lebanese Heart, Flor de Artana, Hardin's Miniature, Post Office Spoonful, Ramallet Ibiza Blanca, Sungold.
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Old January 8, 2019   #14
NathanP
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Hi RandyG,
I am assuming because the Mountain Gem is heterozygous for both Ph-2 and Ph-3? Assuming I am reading correctly that NC 1GEM is homozygous for both Ph-2 and Ph-3, while the NC 4GEM does not have either Ph-2 or Ph-3?

Last edited by NathanP; January 8, 2019 at 10:55 PM.
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Old January 8, 2019   #15
RandyG
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Hi RandyG,
I am assuming because the Mountain Gem is heterozygous for both Ph2 and Ph3? Assuming I am reading correctly that NC 1GEM is homozygous for both Ph2 and Ph3, while the NC 4GEM does not have either Ph2 or Ph3?
NC 1GEM is homozygous for Ve, I, I-2, Ph-2, and Ph-3 genes. NC 4GEM is homozygous for Ve, I, I-2, Sw-5, and Tm-2 genes. Also, both NC 1GEM and NC 4GEM are homozgous for the recessive crimson gene, ogc, which is necessary to have in both parents for expression of crimson fruit color in the F1 hybrid. The hybrid Mountain Gem (NC 4GEM x NC 1GEM) is therefore homozygous for Ve, I, and I-2 and heterozygous for Ph-2, Ph-3, Sw-5, and Tm-2.
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