Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Discussion forum for the various methods and structures used for getting an early start on your growing season, extending it for several weeks or even year 'round.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 3, 2016   #1
Keger
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Richmond, TX
Posts: 327
Default Any luck with winter tomatoes down south?

I know, sounds crazy, but we had a guy down here ( just outside of Houston ) that grew winter tomatoes in a hoop house. Did pretty well with it, but he more or less retired. Has any one tried with any luck? Thanks!
Keger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 12, 2016   #2
Rena
Tomatovillian™
 
Rena's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Warm Springs, GA
Posts: 1,422
Default

I recently was fortunate enough to score a 30x70 hoop house from the department of agriculture for my farm. I am trying to get the feel for timing so that I can extend my growing season. I think I will start my seed this next week (my normal start date is Feb 14th). I will update as I learn and post some pics.
Rena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 12, 2016   #3
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,227
Default

You got an NRCS grant? My mom & step-dad just got theirs this year. Good for you.

If I could implore one word onto you it is this: ventilation! Absent some expensive fans, the ends and sides need to both open once the outside weather gets to about a sunny 90 degrees. And if you are going to grow in extended 90+ degree weather, shade cloth will serve you better than greenhouse plastic.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 12, 2016   #4
Rena
Tomatovillian™
 
Rena's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Warm Springs, GA
Posts: 1,422
Default

Yes, I did!! I was the only one in the county to apply! Crazy. I was awarded a few other practices like fencing, high use areas and a well! What a great program. I keep telling my friends to apply and they say stuff like " I don't want government in my business, or thats to much paperwork (it wasn't)! I paid for the upgraded vents to help with ventilation. Its going to be a bit tricky I think...
Rena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 13, 2016   #5
agee12
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Georgia
Posts: 79
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rena View Post
I recently was fortunate enough to score a 30x70 hoop house from the department of agriculture for my farm. I am trying to get the feel for timing so that I can extend my growing season. I think I will start my seed this next week (my normal start date is Feb 14th). I will update as I learn and post some pics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rena View Post
Yes, I did!! I was the only one in the county to apply! Crazy. I was awarded a few other practices like fencing, high use areas and a well! What a great program. I keep telling my friends to apply and they say stuff like " I don't want government in my business, or thats to much paperwork (it wasn't)! I paid for the upgraded vents to help with ventilation. Its going to be a bit tricky I think...
Do you have to be a business farm?
agee12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 13, 2016   #6
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,121
Default

You do not have to be a business or farm. You can sign up as an individual.
The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) in your county has to recognize you as a Farm.
They will assign you a Farm and Tract number if you apply with them (if your land does not already have these numbers). You bring them documents to show that you own some land, and they will go onto the mapping system and find your parcel.
Then you have the beginnings of eligibility with the NRCS to apply for practices through the EQIP program.

You do not have to be zoned agriculture to get a Farm and Tract number. But you will have to be able to show that you were producing some type of crop prior to an NRCS planner coming out to do a site visit when you apply for a cost-share practice.
This could simply be a small plot in your yard/on your land where you had a personal garden last year. There used to be a requirement that you sold $1,000 worth of product in the past, but they did away with that.

Last edited by PureHarvest; December 13, 2016 at 09:34 AM.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 13, 2016   #7
Rena
Tomatovillian™
 
Rena's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Warm Springs, GA
Posts: 1,422
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PureHarvest View Post
You do not have to be a business or farm. You can sign up as an individual.
The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) in your county has to recognize you as a Farm.
They will assign you a Farm and Tract number if you apply with them (if your land does not already have these numbers). You bring them documents to show that you own some land, and they will go onto the mapping system and find your parcel.
Then you have the beginnings of eligibility with the NRCS to apply for practices through the EQIP program.

You do not have to be zoned agriculture to get a Farm and Tract number. But you will have to be able to show that you were producing some type of crop prior to an NRCS planner coming out to do a site visit when you apply for a cost-share practice.
This could simply be a small plot in your yard/on your land where you had a personal garden last year. There used to be a requirement that you sold $1,000 worth of product in the past, but they did away with that.
YES to both of what has been said. From what I also understand you don't even have to own your own land... you can show a lease and get one. They started out in some states giving them to Veterans who had an interest in farming (Alabama) I think did that. I highly recommend contacting your NRCS office and having one of their people come out and talk with you. They are very helpful and that is what they are supposed to do. I also recommend getting in touch with your local agriculture extension office as they put out a wealth of info on a regular basis.
Not only did they pay for the hoop house on a 100 grant they paid for the irrigation system. They had an engineer come out and specifically design the system to my needs. I can't say enough about trying to apply and being the squeaky wheel. You are welcome to message me privately if you have more questions.
Rena
Rena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 13, 2016   #8
Rena
Tomatovillian™
 
Rena's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Warm Springs, GA
Posts: 1,422
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by agee12 View Post
Do you have to be a business farm?

I am a farm. I have cattle, goats, chickens and bees. I know people who have gotten them that just sell veggies.

What county in Georgia are you in?
Rena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 13, 2016   #9
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,227
Default

One fyi about the high tunnel grant - it says on the web site that you must purchase a kit from an approved manufacturer. But my family got the grant for our own design of an a-frame made of chain link top rail. The county agent said it was as good as any of the kits, and signed off on the grant.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 13, 2016   #10
agee12
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Georgia
Posts: 79
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rena View Post
I am a farm. I have cattle, goats, chickens and bees. I know people who have gotten them that just sell veggies.

What county in Georgia are you in?
I am actually in Atlanta and am a novice gardener. I was not asking on my behalf but the responses makes me wonder if serious city gardeners may also qualify.
agee12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 13, 2016   #11
Rena
Tomatovillian™
 
Rena's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Warm Springs, GA
Posts: 1,422
Default

Well in my opinion there are a lot of people who could benefit from such opportunities but never apply. If you have the land space... and think that you might sell at the market -why not? I have seen lots of local farmers apply and then get the grant not use it. YOU HAVE to build it with you own money first and then you get your money back when its inspected and approved. There are many programs in the government that are ridiculous but helping people grow food to me in not one of them.
Rena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 13, 2016   #12
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,227
Default

I know one guy who got the grant to build his high tunnel on a leased urban lot.

The grant money is based on square footage. Some people come out ahead, especially when they build the structure themselves.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 14, 2016   #13
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,121
Default

Where I am, you can build on leased land, but you still have to have FSA add you as 'Operator', or 'Other Tenant' on the owner's producer report. We also require that you have the land owner sign a 'Control of Land' form which is basically a permission slip from the owner saying they give you permission to do the practice for the lifespan of the practice (high tunnel is 5 years).
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:32 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★