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New to growing your own tomatoes? This is the forum to learn the successful techniques used by seasoned tomato growers. Questions are welcome, too.

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Old June 2, 2020   #16
Father'sDaughter
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They say fermentation removes the gel sac that contains germination inhibitors. That may be part of why your seeds are taking longer than normal to germinate. Fresh seeds will usually pop within a week when fermented.

Last edited by Father'sDaughter; June 3, 2020 at 12:08 PM.
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Old June 3, 2020   #17
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More than 14 days for tomatoes is rough, especially with a mat. Should take about 3-4 days for fresh seed. For eggplant, something like 7-12 is normal, for peppers varies a lot, rocotos took more than 3 weeks (and with very poor percentage), but a jalapeno is under a week.
I find alternating the heat with turning it off seems to help, but I didn't do a controlled experiment.
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Old June 3, 2020   #18
ddsack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zipcode View Post
I find alternating the heat with turning it off seems to help, but I didn't do a controlled experiment.

No controlled experiment here either, but I've been doing that for a few years now. My heat mat runs too hot, and though I can use blocks of wood to raise up the trays higher, I found that I have better germination when I turn off the heater at night. That seems to mimic the day/night heating cycle in nature. And I have fewer of those overly long thin sprouts that hatch and grow fast in the dark looking for light.
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Old June 3, 2020   #19
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Now that they had more time,I have a S-load of the heatmaster seedlings.
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Old June 3, 2020   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Father'sDaughter View Post
They say fermentation removes the gel sac that contains germination inhibitors. That may be part of why your seeds are taking longer than normal to germinate. Fresh seeds will usually pop within a week when fermented.
my non fermented paper plate seeds popped in 4-5 days
A sliced heirloom tomato put right into the ground as slices took 1 week.
But that was at outdoor temps day and night.
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Old June 6, 2020   #21
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The other side of the coin;I had gladiator seeds store bought I put in the ground may 1st
They are big enough to plant.
The same with the phoenix from saved seeds.
It's all in the genes.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #22
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A lot depends on how you start the seeds.
In potting soil,no need to ferment.
The paper towel method needs fermenting or rubbing the gel off.
Paper plate no soil non fermented the gel was still on after 2 weeks.
One seed did pop and I let the rest dry.I have plenty of that variety.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #23
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Like slugworth, my Heatmaster tomatoes were slower to germinate than other varieties, but I usually get 100% germination with Heatmaster and they quickly catch up in growth. I only use my heat mats on pepper seed. I germinate in single seed cells and typically don't up pot. My seeding is usually accomplished in one day. From planting, I normally only need to keep them watered and occasionally lower my growing deck below the lights as the plants grow. I start hardening them outside a couple of weeks before plant out. My philosophy for myself has always been "keep it simple, stupid".
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #24
slugworth
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Looking back at the various seed packets,they cover their hiney by saying germinates in 7-21 days.Like a generic answer.
Starting seeds later I was able to take advantage of sunlight and grow lights.
Sunlight during normal hours then grow lights for overtime and on cloudy days.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #25
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Kumato saved seeds took forever also when I made the attempt years ago.
On a side note,I wonder how many people have run into sterile saved seeds
that I see warnings about on various sites, and are actually true.
4th of july hybrid was supposed to be a sterile when saved seed,but they lied.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slugworth View Post
Kumato saved seeds took forever also when I made the attempt years ago.
On a side note,I wonder how many people have run into sterile saved seeds
that I see warnings about on various sites, and are actually true.
4th of july hybrid was supposed to be a sterile when saved seed,but they lied.

I don't remember anyone saying saved hybrid seeds are sterile. What I do remember people saying is saved hybrid seeds will probably not grow true to the plant or fruit it was saved from. A hybrid plant may produce a great tasting tomato, but it's offspring may taste like card board.


I've also been told that many old hybrid varieties are in fact no longer hybrid. The companies who sell them grew the variety through it's f7 phase, but want the customers to continue believing they are hybrid and will not save seed from them. For the seed producers, it is much less expensive to produce genetically stable seed than constantly producing hybrid seed. I have no idea how true that is.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #27
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There have been reports of people saving seeds from older varieties of hybrids that have grown true in subsequent years, but I think you're right that not too many people will try. These would be stabilized hybrids (and now open pollinated), but the seed companies certainly aren't going to change their labeling...

Then there are hybrids many people have tried to de-hybridize over several years with no luck in getting anything that resembles the original enough. Sungold seems to be the one with the most attempts among T'ville members.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #28
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Where seldom is heard a discouraging word.
The 4th of july hybrids took about 5 or 6 generations to revert back to the origins.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #29
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I grew 4th of July for many years because it is an early producer. I stopped growing them when I realized decent tasting tomatoes could be grown in the same places as the early tomatoes. It didn't harm me to wait a week or two for the good tasting tomatoes. 4th of July always seemed to me to be tasteless, but could be cooked down to a decent tomato sauce and they could be frozen to add to various recipes.



Many people tried to dehybridize Better Boy over the years without success. Carolyn often advised them they were wasting their time because one of the genetic contributors was a variety named Teddy or Teddy Boy. The producer of the Better Boy hybrid had somehow acquired all seed and patents of Teddy and would not name the other contributors. Without knowledge of what you were attempting to standardize to, it would seem to be a waste of time.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #30
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The 4th of july origin was a PL determinate type and some cherry RL indeterminate.
I grew what I call july 5th this year,the determinate PL plants.
They have blossoms and will produce in july.
When I donated to the soup kitchen garden last year I purposely donated tomatoes
that get ripe in july here,so they would have a fast supply for the kitchens.
4th of july hybrid and bloody butcher, 2 types you can't buy locally here.
I had my 1st 4th of july hybrid june 17th and it was delicious.A bought plant that already
had a green tomato.
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