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Old December 25, 2018   #16
SpookyShoe
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Because of my climate, most fall bulbs are treated as annuals. I have to refrigerate them for six weeks, I plant them, they bloom, and I pull them out. So my bulbs aren't in the ground nearly as long as yours are. That being said, the bulbs I have right now are planted along the perimeter of the tomato plant bed. That is because the tomato plants go into the ground around the 1st of March and the daffodils, etc., may still be blooming, however, by the time the tomato plants are of any appreciable size, I will have pulled out the bulbs. Congratulations on being the mayor of Weed City.
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Old December 26, 2018   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nan_PA_6b View Post
I have daffodils, various alliums, winter aconite, triplet lilies, a few squills, grape hyacinth, hyacinth, and maybe some others outside in the ground.
My question is: what do you grow on that soil during the many months your bulbs are dormant? My bulb area is Weed City most of the year.
Nan, I don't know some of what you mentioned, but from what I know I would suggest some low density groundwater plants or annuals that you could plant as the lillies etc are growing up so as not to interfere with there flowering but providing cover over summer and into fall
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Old December 26, 2018   #18
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https://www.gardensalive.com/product...of-your-tulips

This link says not to plant over your tulip bulbs. At the end of the article, the author states that he applies the advice for tulips to all spring bulbs. Maybe others will chime in with advice.
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Old December 26, 2018   #19
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i have iris from the house i grew up in. i transplant them where ever i live. they are a medium purple, and smell like grapes. they were at the house when my folks bought it in the 1950s. i like them.



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Old December 26, 2018   #20
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Plant nothing over the bulbs? Then I'd have an empty bed begging for weeds from June to next March. The article says plant nothing over them because then you'll be feeding and watering whatever you plant there. I'm not feeding and watering that area. Also, if, as per the article, I had to lift the bulbs every year, there are hundreds of bulbs in that area. I'd be shoveling and sifting a very long time.

I guess a ground cover or late-awakening perennial would be the best.
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Old December 26, 2018   #21
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I thought it sounded like a lot of work to have to lift all your bulbs every year and then replant them again every year. I'm sure sooner or later somebody in the know will come up with some good ideas for planting over bulbs.
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Old December 27, 2018   #22
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Nan, considering how many naturalised daffodils, jonquils, ixias and other bulbs I see along road sides and in paddocks where there used to be houses, I think that you can definitely get away with a light groundcover or annuals, particularly as you are not feeding or watering that area
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Old December 27, 2018   #23
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Default Amaryllis

I bought three bulbs at Wal-Mart in October. All were labeled "Minerva," a red and white bi-color. Two of the bulbs turned out to be "Picotee," and 1 of the bulbs turned out to be a red/white color which doesn't look exactly like Minerva. Oh well, all of the plants are pretty.

Nan, when your hundreds of bulbs bloom next year, you must post pictures here, please.
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Old January 7, 2019   #24
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The next of the gladioli to flower, another nice red. still two to flower. They have suffered a bit with some of the heat we have been having, but overall not to badly.
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Old January 7, 2019   #25
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Stunning!
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Old January 7, 2019   #26
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Quote:
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Stunning!
Thank you Nan, there are more that will definitely flower and one that is not showing signs of a spike at this time. Will post photos as they open
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Old January 7, 2019   #27
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Got home from work and found another one out. The one that I thought might not flower has a spike clearly showing
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Old January 7, 2019   #28
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Default Heat damage

As a result of the 110F day we had on Friday, the Gladioli are showing some damage.
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Old January 7, 2019   #29
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Whoops helps to add photos
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Old January 7, 2019   #30
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Wow, nice to see gladiolus being cultivated. Few people in the US seem to grow them, maybe because they’re so associated with funeral arrangements.
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