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Old December 15, 2018   #16
PlainJane
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Thank you. I’ve experimented a bit with lantanas. Something about the scent of the foliage really bugs me, and they trend toward invasive. I’ve used a few in my 2 big galvanized containers and the butterflies do like them. Same with some of the annual salvias.

I’m still getting used to the unpredictability of the weather here. But it sure beats having ice, snow and a short growing season.
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Old December 15, 2018   #17
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Thank you so much!
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Old December 18, 2018   #18
greenthumbomaha
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I couldn't see the photos until now, but I was eagerly following your narrative. Very beautiful edible landscape design with the hardscape highlights and defines the trees, shrubs, and herbs beds. I had a yellow ranch in the country just like yours when I was very small. So charming!

You have incredible patience too. Finding the right place to settle in and doing the soil prep to the extent that you did. I see your neighbors with the marlin house are nature lovers too.

New England explains the want for blueberries! They look so healthy. Do you get multiple pickings in the south?
An aside, I had an amazing low bush in southern New Jersey (I lived all over the northeast as a civilian in the DOD before getting stuck here in O.) The soil and water is so alkaline here that no amount of soil prep will keep down the ph. The orchard master at a popular u-pick ripped out the entire blueberry section after several years of preparation and investment in time and money for the bushes to mature. They were small, weak, and didn't produce, and his orchard was otherwise amazing. He said that was his last hurrah as by the time another section matures and turns a profit he will be retired.

- Lisa
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Old December 18, 2018   #19
PlainJane
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Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
I couldn't see the photos until now, but I was eagerly following your narrative. Very beautiful edible landscape design with the hardscape highlights and defines the trees, shrubs, and herbs beds. I had a yellow ranch in the country just like yours when I was very small. So charming!

You have incredible patience too. Finding the right place to settle in and doing the soil prep to the extent that you did. I see your neighbors with the marlin house are nature lovers too.

New England explains the want for blueberries! They look so healthy. Do you get multiple pickings in the south?
An aside, I had an amazing low bush in southern New Jersey (I lived all over the northeast as a civilian in the DOD before getting stuck here in O.) The soil and water is so alkaline here that no amount of soil prep will keep down the ph. The orchard master at a popular u-pick ripped out the entire blueberry section after several years of preparation and investment in time and money for the bushes to mature. They were small, weak, and didn't produce, and his orchard was otherwise amazing. He said that was his last hurrah as by the time another section matures and turns a profit he will be retired.

- Lisa
Hi Lisa,
This project had been fermenting in my head all the time we rented, and for the whole first year in the house. Then I ordered the fruit trees and the initial 6 blueberries and kept them in fabric pots for a year while we actively planned the project out. I also made lots of vermicompost that year.
We do love blueberries. I’ve just given them a bit of vinegar water from time to time in addition to the sulphur amendments when I planted. I added 4 more southern high bush last fall and may try to squeeze a few more in. Enough for us AND the birds, lol.
The plants bear over multiple weeks and growing different varieties extends the harvest quite a bit. Too bad to hear about the orchardist pulling them out; that’s a major bummer. I’m in Jacksonville and my soul is also alkaline, but I’m determined!
New Jersey grows great blueberries (and tomatoes!)
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Old December 18, 2018   #20
greenthumbomaha
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And cranberries!!
You can't beat Jersey Fresh!

I wonder if those farms (southern/central Jersey)are housing developments now

Good luck with your amendments. I'm routing for your blueberries.

- Lisa
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Old December 19, 2018   #21
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Very nice! I look forward to seeing the plants fill out the space. In north Florida, do you have to worry about "chill hours" for your fruit trees? We do in my area. I don't have any fruit trees, but peaches, grapefruit, and lemons and limes are popular.

Donna, Texas Gulf Coast
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Old December 19, 2018   #22
PlainJane
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Originally Posted by SpookyShoe View Post
Very nice! I look forward to seeing the plants fill out the space. In north Florida, do you have to worry about "chill hours" for your fruit trees? We do in my area. I don't have any fruit trees, but peaches, grapefruit, and lemons and limes are popular.

Donna, Texas Gulf Coast
Hi Donna,
I do have to worry about chill hours, except on the citrus. I spent weeks researching that topic alone when I planned what trees to get.
My 2 apples are right on the edge but I chose them because of disease resistance. What I really want are sweet cherries! Luckily there are breeding efforts underway in that direction.
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Old December 22, 2018   #23
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Default lantana/be careful

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Originally Posted by PlainJane View Post
Thank you. I’ve experimented a bit with lantanas. Something about the scent of the foliage really bugs me, and they trend toward invasive. I’ve used a few in my 2 big galvanized containers and the butterflies do like them. Same with some of the annual salvias.

I’m still getting used to the unpredictability of the weather here. But it sure beats having ice, snow and a short growing season.

I love them, but I have only one, in a front yard bed. Our vet told us they are poisonous to dogs. And our dog Rusty would eat the leaves. But there are varieties that can be grown in hanging baskets.

Donna
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Old December 22, 2018   #24
PlainJane
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Donna, I did not know they were poisonous to dogs. Good to know.
Hanging baskets look nice but I’ve never been successful with them for some reason, so I stick with containers.
- Joyce
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