Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating peppers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 2, 2018   #1
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 12,436
Default Tricked You Peppers & Others

It's a hybrid pepper that is supposed to be an improved version of 'Fooled You' jalapeno. I have never grown either variety and am wondering if any of you have grown them? Do they taste like a jalapeno just without the heat?
--------
I'm looking at the new Seeds n Such catalog and found a variety called Takara Shish!to. I'm wondering if they are same thing as Shish!to? It says that 10% of them can be spicy. Uh-huh, let them grow out in the Texas heat and about 90% can be spicy.
-------
Banana peppers were boring to me until one day when I tossed some into a hot pan. They release a wonderful flavor - so good that we made chili powder out of them. No questions - I just wanted to share that info.
-------
I'm thinking about growing some Gypsy and/or Cubanelle. I want to grow a few varieties that are less than 3,000 Scoville Units. Do any of you have ideas? I'll most likely order seeds from Seeds n Such.

As for hotter peppers - every grocery store around here sells them very cheaply.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 2, 2018   #2
ContainerTed
Tomatovillian™
 
ContainerTed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 6a - NE Tennessee
Posts: 4,268
Default

Robert, I've grown "Fooled You Jalapeno" and it has the rich flavor most of us would love, but none of the heat. My wife likes the flavor but cannot handle the heat, so we grow them to make stuffed jalapenos that she really loves. There are a couple of the "heatless" ones and there's also the Zavory Habanero that also has the flavor and none of the heat.

At a very personal level, I'm a self professed pepper wimp. However, I do like deseeded jalapeno peppers when used as a stuffed pepper - usually with some kind of meat combination.
__________________
Ted
________________________
Owner & Operator Of
The Muddy Bucket Farm




ContainerTed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 2, 2018   #3
rhines81
Tomatovillian™
 
rhines81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Zone 5A, Poconos
Posts: 920
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
As for hotter peppers - every grocery store around here sells them very cheaply.
I've not been able to find a hot jalapeno from a grocery store in ages ... they all seem extremely mild, almost no heat, compared to homegrown. I think it is a supply chain thing. When I order sliced jalapenos on my pizza, they are usually a perfect heat so I guess they are sourced differently.
If flavor and reduced heat is what you want, maybe stick to Anaheims?

Last edited by rhines81; December 2, 2018 at 07:24 PM.
rhines81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 2, 2018   #4
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: earth
Posts: 36,006
Default

I would like to help but I haven't a clue as to what would be hot for someone else compared to what I consider hot.

I wouldn't spend one cent on a non hot jalapeno pepper.
__________________
Happy Fermenting.
I Texas.
Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3, 2018   #5
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 12,436
Default

Thank you Ted, that's what I was hoping for from 'Fooled You/Tricked You'. About half of my family and friends want to eat peppers, but they can't take the heat.

Rhines81, jalapeno peppers are a guessing game around here. Sometimes they are not very hot at all, and sometimes they are still hot even after taking the seeds out.

Worth, you already know that I want to try the no heat peppers for my family and friends. For me personally, I like growing peppers that I can pick and eat in the garden. Serrano is my general limit on eating them fresh - although I've eaten plenty of early season tabasco peppers.

You won't see me eating a fresh tabasco pepper in August or later - been there, lips and tongue caught on fire
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3, 2018   #6
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 12,436
Default

My wife chose a couple of varieties. Fooled You is one of them, she found one that sounds interesting - I had never heard of it. Candy Cane Red Hybrid https://www.seedsnsuch.com/product/c...ne-red-hybrid/ It sure looks interesting. She wants us to grow it for striped colors.

So far, I've chosen Jimmy Nardello. Not just because I've read so many good reviews here and on other sites, but I tried growing it a couple years ago in a section of a garden with RKN and FW3. I was unaware of the soil problems, so I want to give them a second chance, but this time in 5 gallon buckets.

I did read about a variety of Ancho/poblano that might work for gardeners with cooler growing conditions. Mosquetero https://www.seedsnsuch.com/product/mosquetero-hybrid/
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 12, 2018   #7
PlainJane
Tomatovillian™
 
PlainJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: North Florida
Posts: 403
Default

This year I grew a very interesting little seasoning pepper called Biquinho Yellow. (It also comes in red and white)
The plants are very prolific and have the most unusual flavor with just a touch of heat. They’re from South America and often pickled. I add them and my red Mad Hatters to all my sautés and stir fries.
PlainJane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3, 2018   #8
ContainerTed
Tomatovillian™
 
ContainerTed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 6a - NE Tennessee
Posts: 4,268
Default

Robert, I grew Jimmy Nardello about 10 ago. It was a skinny thing about 10 inches long. In the raw, it was nothing to get excited about, but put it on the grill or in the skillet and it popped with a flavor that will please even the novice (which I was at the time). With sime of the mildly warm varieties, I think my data shows that reducing the direct sun exposure in the last half of the pepper's maturing and color changing life will also gain you a slightly less heat factor. Nothing to back up that statement. It's just a feeling/impression I got.

The year I grew JimNar, I also tried to grow Corno di Toro. The seed I received in a trade turned out to be "Corno di Holy Krap". The scoville must have been about 20,000. It was way above regular jalapenos. So beware of all supposedly "NON HOT" peppers until you can cut a small area of the skin and touch a micro dot of the juice/fluid to your finger and then your tongue.

After a couple of years of adding a small dash of ground red pepper to most of my soups and smoked meat dishes, I can handle more of the heat. You might think about that for some your family members if they wish to gain more tolerance to the heat. I can actually stand a couple wings that were prepared with a habanero sauce. I keep the milk close, though.
__________________
Ted
________________________
Owner & Operator Of
The Muddy Bucket Farm




ContainerTed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3, 2018   #9
Salsacharley
Tomatovillian™
 
Salsacharley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 1,886
Default

Check out the New Mexico State University Chile Pepper Institute site. They have Numex Primavera Jalapeno that is mild, and they have Numex Trick or Treat habanero that has no heat, but habanero flavor.

https://cpi.nmsu.edu/
Salsacharley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3, 2018   #10
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 12,436
Default

Charley, that's a really good site, and it has been a while since I've looked at it. I will check it out.

I'm making my list - checking it twice... more like checking it 10 times.
All of the varieties listed below can be found at this site https://www.seedsnsuch.com/product-c...seeds/peppers/ The number after the variety name is what page they are on.

These are going to be bought. 3 of the 4 varieties are ones that I have wanted to grow for years.

Alma Paprika 1
Candy Cane Red Hybrid 2
Fooled You Jalapeno Hybrid 3
Jimmy Nardello 5

The maybe list:

Cherry Pick Hybrid 2
Hungarian Cheese Hybrid 5
Pretty N Sweet Hybrid 7 (Can be grown in a 6 inch pot. I like that.)
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert

Last edited by AlittleSalt; December 3, 2018 at 04:42 PM.
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3, 2018   #11
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 2,080
Default

Someone pointed out that Candy Cane Red does not retain it's stripes when grown to full maturity.


I might be able to help with seeds of some of the other varieties. Going to a holiday party across town tonight. Weather is brutal, but the food n fun is great. . Will check when I get back later this evening.


- Lisa
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3, 2018   #12
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 12,436
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
Someone pointed out that Candy Cane Red does not retain it's stripes when grown to full maturity.


I might be able to help with seeds of some of the other varieties. Going to a holiday party across town tonight. Weather is brutal, but the food n fun is great. . Will check when I get back later this evening.


- Lisa
All of the sites I looked at says the same thing. They do mature to be red, but that would explain the red part of the name
Be careful in that weather.

EPawlick, Roulette Hybrid sounds like a good name for that variety.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3, 2018   #13
EPawlick
Tomatovillian™
 
EPawlick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada Zone 6b
Posts: 232
Default

We grew Roulette this year--it's a sweet no heat Habanero.

Mostly no heat but occasionally one may be hot. Useful as a replacement for sweet peppers.

Perfect for small gardens with short growing season.



https://www.damseeds.ca/productcart/...dCategory=3944

D317 Roulette Hybrid

2018 AAS Winner. Roulette is typically a sweet no heat Habanero. However it gets its name Roulette because on occasion there is hot fruit produced. Normally a Habanero is too hot for most Canadians to taste and the heat masks its intense citrusy flavour. With Roulette, typically it has no heat so you can taste the citrusy flavour of the fruit. It is also an early producer, yielding over 50 large 3.5" x 2" fruits per plant. Fruits turn deep red when mature. This is one you have to try!
EPawlick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 4, 2018   #14
Greatgardens
Tomatovillian™
 
Greatgardens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 735
Default

I tried "Fooled You" (supposedly a hybrid) a couple of times, and it didn't do well for me here in IN. I got very few peppers, although they were mild. Hope your luck is better. I'm going with Numex Primavera next spring, and hope it comes though for me. I'm not a pepper afficionado at all, but the Numex varieties I've grown previously have done well.
-GG
Greatgardens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 5, 2018   #15
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 8,257
Default

Fooled You tasted like a green bell for me. It wasn't bad, but I just couldn't distinguish the taste any from green bell pepper. I could see the novelty of wanting a small pepper to stuff for those who are averse to regular jalapenos.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:55 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★