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General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

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Old April 7, 2019   #1
AlittleSalt
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For years here at Tomatoville, I have read about others bagging tomato plants. I understand the reasoning, but I'm not sure if that is the route I want to go. I grow tomato plants only in containers now because of the two soil-borne diseases RKN and FW3. (Most of you already know that)

In the main garden, there are 10 tomato plants being grown. I'm not worried about cross pollination with those 10 plants because those varieties are easy to get seeds for. I will list those varieties below including a funny yet poignant comment about one variety.

Red Cherry (The pre-1900 one)
Rainbow
Black Cherry
Cupid F1
Sunsugar F1 x 2
Indigo Sun F1
Indigo Ruby F1
Red Pear (Pre 1800)
Yellow Pear - "Tormato, no yuck emoticon " I'm growing YP in memory of my father and the fact that he liked it...even though it had little taste. The main garden is right beside my house to the northwest.

I have three Japanese Pink Cherry plants that are in the stage of cotyledons just starting to have the tiniest growth of true leaves - it is sort of like watching kittens opening their eyes for the first time.

I want to isolate two those three Japanese Pink Cherry plants to produce true seeds. The reasons why are because they used to be sold as F1 hybrids according to Carolyn Male (I completely believe she is right) Through the years, they became OP, and I believe that is why you can't find them at seed selling sites. It goes against marketing. F1s are all the rage because people want to make money. I understand that.

If my Japanese Pink Cherry plants make it through a Texas Spring and they are true - I will be offering seeds to everyone. So why Japanese Pink Cherry? There is a clear clue in its name, "Pink". It's sweet without being overly sweet producing perfectly shaped cherry tomatoes. I would rank JPC well above Sungold in so many ways. (It might be a parent of Sungold?)

The third JPC, I want to cross with a Porter pink cherry tomato that happens to be in the exact same stage. Why? Just because I want to do it. I don't know how to select genes or any of that type of thing. It's just a thought about crossing my favorite two PWR cherry tomatoes.
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Old April 7, 2019   #2
Salsacharley
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This looks like a worthy endeavor. I am just curious how you kept your Japanese Pink seeds pure up to this point.
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Old April 7, 2019   #3
AlittleSalt
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I grew them 2 years ago and saved seeds. Last year they produced true from the saved seeds. The ones I planted this year come from the seeds I saved in 2017. I didn't save any seeds last year.
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