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Old February 19, 2019   #16
DonDuck
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For me, Goliath was a very good pepper, but grown side by side with Mammoth in various parts of my garden; Mammoth was more productive and larger. I really believe the climate in different zones has great influence on which cultivar performs best. It seems the climate in my area is best suited to grow Mammoth.
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Old February 19, 2019   #17
seasyde
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I grew the Jedi last year and am repeating them this year. I grow most peppers in pots since our cooler climate (Seattle) makes ripe peppers iffy if grown in the ground. I did get ripe peppers. They were between 3 & 4 ", no corking. Decent production.
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Old February 20, 2019   #18
snagged
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Default Jalafeugo

Another vote for Jalafuego. Have grown it for several years and is incredibly productive.
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Old February 20, 2019   #19
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Not sure if it's a Hybrid, just labeled as Giant Jalapeno.



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Old February 20, 2019   #20
greenthumbomaha
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Squibb, that is a huge pepper and looks very much like one I grew a few years ago. By any chance, did you get the seeds from an earlier MMMM? I was so impressed with the size that I saved seed, but can't remember the original source. I didn't grow it last year because it was very slow to turn green that year.




Any others grow a pepper with this name this from MMMM seed?

Any guesses as to OP or Hybrid?


- Lisa

Last edited by greenthumbomaha; February 20, 2019 at 11:01 PM.
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Old February 21, 2019   #21
GoDawgs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockandrollin View Post
Generally speaking, the corking indicates that the jalapeno is at or near it's hottest. So if you wait until it's corked and red, then you will have the jalapeno at it's hottest and sweetest.
Thanks for the explanation. I always wondered about that pattern on the peppers and wondered what it was. It had to have a name and indicate something. More new information that's now stored in the mental library!
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Old February 24, 2019   #22
Ozark
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My wife found a vacuum-sealed bag of whole garden jalapenos in our freezer today, and I made a tray of "poppers" stuffed with sausage and cream cheese on our pellet grill to go with supper. Good eating!

I thought we were out of those, but things get lost in the freezer sometimes. These were from a couple of years ago when my jalapeno plants were producing so heavily that I just washed bunches of peppers off and froze them whole in bags for a while. That easy method works just fine.

Pretty sure these were Mammoth jalapenos - very large peppers and good producers, but a little hot for our taste. The heat in peppers depends a lot on growing conditions of course, but I'll try Emerald Fire this year and see how that does - they're supposed to have around 2500 Scoville units as compared to Mammoth's 5000.
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Old February 24, 2019   #23
PlainJane
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I’m growing Craig’s Grande this year ... excited.
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Old March 6, 2019   #24
greenthumbomaha
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I've started the corky unbranded jals from last year, because that is what was handy before the blizzard hit. I found a packet of 2015 Tajun which was packed by a little known brand, Home Farmer from a hardware chain had these on special in boxes of mixed vegetables. The seeds were coated so I had low expectations of germination and would gladly have been excited to get one plant to trial. I am now the proud parent of the entire pack of 12 infants. Two days germination!! They are very robust. One plant is plenty for me, but this was a fun surprise.



I've exhausted my supply of one packet, so next year I'll will be in the market for one of the varieties mentioned. Not much chatter on the web about Tajun, but it is listed as a hybrid and one univ trial had high-moderate production.


- Lisa
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Old March 9, 2019   #25
Foose4string
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I’ve had good luck with regular ol Jalapeño M. Plenty of heat and average size. I also like Coyame. Very large Jalapeño but with mild heat. I grow the hot ones for my wife. I prefer sweet and mildly hot peppers.
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Old March 9, 2019   #26
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I grew Triunfo from High Mowing Seeds last year and they definitely lived up to their description. Very productive and a nice heat.

This year someone gave me some Gigantia and some Stuard seeds so I'm growing them. Anyone know anything about the Stuard variety? I can't find anything on them and the person who gave me the seeds didn't offer much info.
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Old September 5, 2019   #27
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Is mammoth a hybrid?, there's not many places that have seeds. And really none of these are available in Europe. The only one I can find is Craig's Grande, but that doesn't seem that special. I'm more after production than size, since I will use them green for pickling, but usually size correlates with production.
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Old September 5, 2019   #28
GoDawgs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
We're very much on the same page, especially the smooth characteristic. I imagine growing conditions play a role in heat the jalapeno pepper too. One year I grew regular jalapenos for stuffing with cream cheese and were too hot for my daughter to eat, and she loves Thai foodand requests it extra hot.
Here's a tip I read about which will be heresy for those who have to have heat but it's worked for me for a long time. Tolerable heat and still all the jalapeno flavor. When I make poppers I cut the jalapenos in half lengthwise and scrape out the seeds and veins but leave the cap in place so cheese doesn't run out the end. Then I boil some water in a small pan and simmer the halves. It will tame the pepper's heat.

You'd have to test how long suits your taste. I let them go about 6 minutes, then remove them and put them upside down on a paper towel to drain and cool before stuffing them with a cream cheese, sharp cheddar, garlic powder, cumin etc filling.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #29
rhines81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoDawgs View Post
Here's a tip I read about which will be heresy for those who have to have heat but it's worked for me for a long time. Tolerable heat and still all the jalapeno flavor. When I make poppers I cut the jalapenos in half lengthwise and scrape out the seeds and veins but leave the cap in place so cheese doesn't run out the end. Then I boil some water in a small pan and simmer the halves. It will tame the pepper's heat.

You'd have to test how long suits your taste. I let them go about 6 minutes, then remove them and put them upside down on a paper towel to drain and cool before stuffing them with a cream cheese, sharp cheddar, garlic powder, cumin etc filling.
if you really want heat in your poppers, take a few jalapenos (or other hotter peppers - even habenero) and put them in a blender. Mix this puree with your cream cheese/meat mix for stuffing. Nothing wrong with scraping out the seeds before stuffing. I steam cook my poppers, length of time varies depending on flesh thickness. Oh, and I steam them pre-stuffed!

Last edited by rhines81; 4 Weeks Ago at 08:26 PM. Reason: stuffing
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #30
shule1
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I've heard that corked peppers have better taste. So, I grew Farmer's Jalapeno. Mine wasn't nearly as corked as advertised (but still more corked than any other pepper I've tried) and it had quite good flavor. I think maybe it was a cross.

Other good OP ones for flavor I've tried include Randy Sine's Evil Jalapeno (when green), and Jumbo Jalapeno. None of them had much corking, although RSEJ had some this year, for the first time that I recall. Jumbo Jalapeno was kind of late, but the peppers were a fair size (perhaps not as big as you're looking for, though).

The only commercial F1 hybrid Jalapeno I've tried was Jalapeno Gigante F1 from Burpee. It didn't have a lot of flavor (kind of like the grocery store ones) and it wasn't giant, but it was prolific. The peppers were sufficiently fat to stuff. It's the fattest Jalapeno I've grown.

Last edited by shule1; 4 Weeks Ago at 09:00 PM.
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