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Old July 3, 2017   #91
BigVanVader
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Holy cow! What crosses are they?
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Old July 3, 2017   #92
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Strongplant, those tomatoes look great. I would love to hear more about them.
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Old July 3, 2017   #93
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The perfect,round fruits from the first pic on the right row is an F1 hybrid from a last year's cross.One parent is unstabilized comercial hybird(F4),but I don't know which one,unfortunatelly.I think it might be big beef:


The second parent is the variety you're all familiar with: Indigo rose.Indigo preforms quite poorly compared to my other varieties,it grows really slowly and always ripens last.But I was reading about it and noticed it has quite a breeding history that lead to it's creation.Because many wild species were used,I decided to make just 1 cross,and planted 10 hybrid plants in the GH.As you can see,I was not disapointed.It's still far off from the goal,but the hybrids do preform better than both parents.It has smaller fruits than the F4 parent,but it grows faster and overall yield is increased:

Some trusses are impressive:


On the second pic you can see my 2 cherry rows,a lot of yellow comes from a multiflora Ildi:

Looks cool,but only the first 2 trusses are like this,upper ones have less fruits.

Cherries typically have lesser yields than big tomatoes,and I'm trying to change that with multifloral varieties since they have a huge potential for yield.
This is a hybrid between Ildi and another multiflora("Red pear multicluster"),it shows only slighty better preformance than parents,but I'm looking into changing that by breeding multiflora varieties that are genetically diverged from each other,hopefully this will produce better multifloral hybrids:

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Old July 12, 2017   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JosephineRose View Post
An 11 oz tomato from my year-old Uluru Ochre plant, picked Sunday, eaten last night along with a smaller brother. Note to all: indeterminate dwarf plants don't stay dwarf in the second year, if you can get it there. It's 6 ft tall now, and loaded with fruit.

It was delicious. A delightful surprise to have it come back as it did.



Wow! I didn't even know you could take a tomato plant to that stage. Mine usually start to die when the summer is over. They never get past October anyway.
Second Wow: your tomato looks delicious!. I'm growing Uluru Ochre for the firt time this year. I only have two plants and both are starting to set fruits right these days, so it'll take a while before I can eat them. I hope they don't ripen when I leave for my vacation in August!
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Old July 12, 2017   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fritz77 View Post
Wow! I didn't even know you could take a tomato plant to that stage. Mine usually start to die when the summer is over. They never get past October anyway.
Second Wow: your tomato looks delicious!. I'm growing Uluru Ochre for the firt time this year. I only have two plants and both are starting to set fruits right these days, so it'll take a while before I can eat them. I hope they don't ripen when I leave for my vacation in August!
All of my dwarf plants have had issues with mildew and mold disease due to the cool foggy nights we can have here. This one had disease but still produced fruit last season.

I cut this one back last fall and he kept sprouting back with new growth, so I just went with it and overwintered it in a pop up greenhouse. It produced only three fruits over winter, but when it came out in March, it started up full force again with lots of blooms. The plant looks like a huge woody wine with random leaf buds and fruit. It's bizarre, but it's producing beautifully, especially after the "tuning fork pollination." I'll take it!

Mine came in about 90 days from transplant, and I am in a cooler climate here in northern California. But it burns off in daytime and gets warm and dry. No frosts here really, but a true heat index doesn't really hit until September/October. I would think in Italy the heat will pull you through.
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Old July 13, 2017   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StrongPlant View Post
Cherries typically have lesser yields than big tomatoes,and I'm trying to change that with multifloral varieties since they have a huge potential for yield.

I think the biggest production potential have the 'regular truss multiflora' as I call them (longer trusses that split and split), so like commercial hybrid cherries have, and not the highly branching trait of Ildi type.
The thing with the highly branching is the amount of flowers that don't fruit. That is a massive amount of wasted energy, like 10% of them set.
The easiest way to obtain the gene is to buy some of these commercial grape packages (which are usually pretty gosh darnoodley good tasting), and try growing f2s from them. The results will vary, the highest yield I got was from a Coeur de Pigeon F2 (commercial name on a package from France, quite expensive), but I think they changed the variety they used since I tried it 6 years ago. Ildi is a poor producer compared to what you get from these f2s, it makes 30-100 per truss and does so until 10 trusses or more.
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Old July 13, 2017   #97
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Originally Posted by zipcode View Post
I think the biggest production potential have the 'regular truss multiflora' as I call them (longer trusses that split and split), so like commercial hybrid cherries have, and not the highly branching trait of Ildi type.
The thing with the highly branching is the amount of flowers that don't fruit. That is a massive amount of wasted energy, like 10% of them set.
The easiest way to obtain the gene is to buy some of these commercial grape packages (which are usually pretty gosh darnoodley good tasting), and try growing f2s from them. The results will vary, the highest yield I got was from a Coeur de Pigeon F2 (commercial name on a package from France, quite expensive), but I think they changed the variety they used since I tried it 6 years ago. Ildi is a poor producer compared to what you get from these f2s, it makes 30-100 per truss and does so until 10 trusses or more.
I already have a few lines exibiting medium branching of inflorescence but it's always unstable in terms of how much it branches,ussualy starts off high at the 1st truss and then it decreases on the upper ones.If the hybrids you mention have stable branching that would be useful indeed.
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Old July 13, 2017   #98
Fritz77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JosephineRose View Post
All of my dwarf plants have had issues with mildew and mold disease due to the cool foggy nights we can have here. This one had disease but still produced fruit last season.

I cut this one back last fall and he kept sprouting back with new growth, so I just went with it and overwintered it in a pop up greenhouse. It produced only three fruits over winter, but when it came out in March, it started up full force again with lots of blooms. The plant looks like a huge woody wine with random leaf buds and fruit. It's bizarre, but it's producing beautifully, especially after the "tuning fork pollination." I'll take it!

Mine came in about 90 days from transplant, and I am in a cooler climate here in northern California. But it burns off in daytime and gets warm and dry. No frosts here really, but a true heat index doesn't really hit until September/October. I would think in Italy the heat will pull you through.
That's even more surprising. You deserve a third "Wow!"
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Old July 13, 2017   #99
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My plants would have made a thousand tomatoes if it weren't for blossom drop in high heat.
In containers mind you they are still growing and putting out blooms in almost 100 degree heat.

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Old July 13, 2017   #100
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Here are some of my plants. Overall I'd say I'm having a better season this year. Last season though I already had a lot of ripe tomatoes at this time of the summer. And the strange thing is that I even transplanted everything a couple of weeks earlier than I did last year.

1) Here is my first almost ripe tomato, a Ruby Surprise, just 60 days after transplant (declared DTM was 80).

2-3) Blue Beauty. I keep looking at those fruits. I wonder how they'll taste. Anyhow I think it was worth growing them

4-5) Rebel Yell is my work horse so far and I definitely need to reinforce those trusses before it's too late

6) 1884 purple is a close second in terms of production so far.

7) My Girl Girl's Weird thing plants are still behind but they are loaded with tomatoes

8) After a struggling start, I'm happy I decided to try some dwarfs this season. They are among the healthiest and sturdiest plants I have. Here is a Wherokowhai plant I'm growing with an Uluru Ochre in a 7 gal clay pot. It's less than 2 feet tall, but it's loaded with 6 medium size tomatoes

9) George Detsikas Italian Red didn't get the best spot in the garden. Few fruits but more than decent size.

10) From the very first moment the seedlings sprouted, Slankard's appeared to be the sturdiest variety I had. This big mater is the result

11) My only survived Maglia Rosa plant is kind of thin, but this truss looks promising

12) Canestrino is a variety that grows well in this area and with our climate
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Old July 13, 2017   #101
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Great job Fritz, they look wondrrful.
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Old July 13, 2017   #102
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Great job Fritz, they look wondrrful.
Thank you. Some of the seeds actually come from you. Namely Maglia Rosa and GGWT.

Also Vorlon and Lucid Gem which are not depicted here but are growing in my garden, came from you
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Old July 13, 2017   #103
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So glad to see you're having a good season this year!
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Old July 13, 2017   #104
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StrongPlant have you tried Zluta Kytice? It makes hundreds if not a thousand tomatoes and they have a great tomato flavor.
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Old July 13, 2017   #105
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Puttin on the Fritz, nice j-o-b; also strongplant. Europia seems like an idealistic environment, with a few exceptions. That blue tomato sure is an odd job, what variation is that one. Looks kindof like cobalt blue...
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