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General information and discussion about cultivating beans, peas, peanuts, clover and vetch.

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Old May 5, 2012   #16
desertlzbn
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Tracydr, or Worth I will be going over to Native Seed Search on Tuesday if you need anything let me know, and I will pick it up for you.
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Old May 5, 2012   #17
Worth1
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Originally Posted by desertlzbn View Post
Tracydr, or Worth I will be going over to Native Seed Search on Tuesday if you need anything let me know, and I will pick it up for you.
Darn your hide.

I haven't been to the site in a while, I was looking at corn they seem to have more than before.

I can't make my mind up.

Not too late in Texas for corn.

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Old May 5, 2012   #18
Tracydr
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Tracydr, or Worth I will be going over to Native Seed Search on Tuesday if you need anything let me know, and I will pick it up for you.
I'm looking for L'ltoi. I'd love if you find any!
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Old May 5, 2012   #19
desertlzbn
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I will look in their seed library
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Old May 5, 2012   #20
bitterwort
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I like them cut into shorter lengths and stir-fried hot with some green onions and oyster mushrooms and garlic, if inclined, and then finished off with a bit of oyster sauce or szechuan sauce. They do cook more quickly than string beans, and I view that as an advantage after work!

I planted some Mosaic from Kitazawa in a raised bed last year and they were doing fairly well until they were engulfed by the tomatoes next to them. I've started some again this year, planning to give them more room, and will add Red Noodle direct seeded at my community garden plot.
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Old May 5, 2012   #21
goodwin
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I take Red Noodle beans to the market in Santa Fe where they are a big seller. They vine 8 feet or more and really produce here as long as you keep them picked. In fact, I was just planting some this afternoon. I'd say they are best cut on an angle and fried up. That way they keep their color and nutty flavor.
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Old May 5, 2012   #22
John3
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Reading the cooking posts got me hungry.
Here's one - take some banana peppers (mild or hot your choice) cut the tops off and clip the bottoms and get the seeds out - put to the side - take the beans and cut to about 1 inch size - take a baby finger eggplant slice about 1/8 inch slices - take a baby yellow squash (about a 2 to 3 inch size) and slice it up - take a scallion (bunching onion and dice it up - take a couple cloves of garlic and dice them up - take a baby broccoli and cut it up - take a extra dwarf bok choy and cut it up ---- put them all (not the banana peppers) into a pan with olive oil or butter and saute for a few minutes ----- take the sauteed vegs and stuff into the banana peppers and place them onto a cookie pan (have the banana peppers top raised some (propped up some) heat up for a few minutes then add some shredded cheese and melt the cheese and eat when cool enough to do so------------------ man did i get hungry
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Old May 5, 2012   #23
Tracydr
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I take Red Noodle beans to the market in Santa Fe where they are a big seller. They vine 8 feet or more and really produce here as long as you keep them picked. In fact, I was just planting some this afternoon. I'd say they are best cut on an angle and fried up. That way they keep their color and nutty flavor.
I'm trying red noodle this year.
I need to get them in the ground!
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Old May 5, 2012   #24
Tracydr
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I need a long bean/egg plant recipe.
That's what grows in the garden when it's hot. Have plenty of lemon grass, too.
I'm trying malabar spinach this year, too.
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Old May 6, 2012   #25
John3
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Quote:
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I need a long bean/egg plant recipe.
That's what grows in the garden when it's hot. Have plenty of lemon grass, too.
I'm trying malabar spinach this year, too.
Let's take what you have listed - take the eggplant ( I am guessing you have a reg eggplant and not the baby fingers) cut it in half - take the cut half's and cut out the centers so they would look like an avocado cut in half with the seed out (keep the center pieces you cut out and dice them up) - take your long beans and slice them up - take your malabar spinach and slice them up - take some lemon grass and slice them up - saute in butter or olive oil for a few minutes (I would add some garlic) - now take the cut in half eggplant and put some shredded cheese in them then fill with sauteed vegs then put some shredded cheese layered with the lemon grass on top of that - put them into the oven and bake. The eggplant should absorb all the flavors of the sauteed vegs. i wouldn't eat the eggplant skin I would use a spoon and scoop the bake eggplant with each bite with the sauteed vegs and cheese (using the eggplant as a kind of bowl).
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Old May 10, 2012   #26
Zeedman
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Haven't been here much lately, but glad I found this post.

Yardlongs have a place in my garden every year; I've collected 10 varieties from around the world (some of which I have yet to grow out). The wife uses them in stir fries, soups & stews. We also just eat them as a vegetable, seasoned with vinegar, soy sauce, and garlic powder. "Chinese Red Noodle" is great that way; unlike purple beans, they keep their color when cooked. They turn grayish when cooked, but a touch of vinegar restores most of the burgundy-red color... really eye catching.

Most long beans are strong climbers, and need the same tall support you would give a vigorous pole bean. They seem reluctant to climb some artificial materials, so I've had my best results using natural twine strung from a trellis. There are a few bush long beans also; I grow one from China that has the fastest DTM of any long bean I've grown (50 days), but I would categorize it as a "footlong".

There is considerable variation in yield between different varieties, as well as different flavors & textures. Some of my highest yields have been with black seeded cultivars, which also had a shorter DTM than most; but I prefer the sweeter flavor & firmer texture of the red-seeded varieties and those with bicolored red & white seed. Most of the "calico" seeded varieties I have came from the Philippines. There is also a gray-seeded cultivar from Thailand, with pods that are glossy & so light green that they are almost white. I've tried two white-seeded cultivars, but one had zero germination, and one was daylength sensitive.


From top to bottom: Yancheng Bush, Asparagus bean, Chinese Red Noodle, Galante

On that note... if you collect yardlong seed that originated directly from tropical sources, you might encounter problems with photo-period sensitivity. Both the white-seeded variety mentioned above (from Malaysia) and a red-podded variety from the Philippines had this trait. They will only flower & fruit when days are short. In our higher latitudes, this means they grow lush vines, but don't begin to flower until close to the equinox - which is in September. That's nearly the end of my growing season, so while I might get a few pods in a good year, it is nearly impossible to get dry seed.

One of the reasons that I always grow yardlongs (and also cowpeas) is that they attract & hold beneficial insects when they begin blooming. Ladybugs love the substance produced in the extra-floral nectaries (the bumps located below the flowers). But then, so do ants and wasps. The wasps seem to be pacified by the nectar, and are unusually docile; I can walk & pick among the vines, and they show none of their usual aggressive behavior. I've only been stung when I accidentally grabbed one while picking a pod. The wasps, for their part, attack insect pests on other plants, so I am glad to see them. If you are allergic to stings, though, you might want to think twice about growing yardlongs.

Ants are another matter; they will raise aphids on the plants (especially the tops of the pods) and will defend the vines vigorously. That's usually only a minor annoyance; I "thump" the pods before I pick them, knocking off the ants. But every once in awhile, I get carpenter ants on the vines, and they bite.
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Old May 23, 2012   #27
Worth1
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My Chinese Long Beans have started blooming.
The first ones bloomed today.
Darn things are climbing everywhere.
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Old May 23, 2012   #28
desertlzbn
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I would love to grow all of those, where can I get seed?
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Old May 24, 2012   #29
Tracydr
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Baker Creek has a few. Pinetree .
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Old May 24, 2012   #30
muskymojo
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I'm growing Longyard "Asparagus Beans" for the first time this year. The seeds are Burpee. I had never heard of them, and it was an impulse buy. I just sowed the seeds a few days ago. Does anyone know how big of trellis is needed? I only put up a 2' wide by 5' tall trellis, because I wasn't sure if they actually tasted good, or were more of a novelty. Should I replace it with a bigger one before they start growing, or will that work? I'm excited about growing them after reading this thread!
Thanks!
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