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Old February 15, 2024   #16
seaeagle
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ddsack - It is possible to grow sweet potatoes in zone 3. But it would probably be like someone in Virginia trying to grow avocados. Can be done with certain varieties but probably not worth the trouble.Here is a video of someone growing in zone 4 Montana. They made mistakes by not growing the extra early varieties and by planting whole sweet potatoes but they did good and will do better next year with early varieties like Beauregard and o'Henry. Georgia Jets is even earlier they say and Radiance was bred especially for Canada.

RADIANCE was released by LSU Ag Center. Radiance is an orange flesh, purple-red skinned sweet potato capable of high yields in northern latitudes. It has shown superior disease resistance to fusarium wilt. This variety produces US#1 grade and total marketable yields equal or higher than ‘Covington’ and ‘Orleans’ in Candian sweetpotato production regions. It tends to have more Jumbos than ‘Covington’ and ‘Orleans’, indicative of its earliness.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WrbZx3xJkw


Mrs. Justice, I know how hard it is to find garden space. Always something like too much shade, too wet, poor soil and so on. It really doesn't take all that much space to grow a bumper crop of sweet potatoes and you are in the heart of sweet potato country. Here are a couple of my favorite sweet potato videos.

This one is an amazing harvest in a small space. The sweet potatoes are crazy shapes maybe from the loose soil.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IzNIr6IbAt4

More space and a huge crop of sweet potatoes. I like this one because they tell you what the name of the varieties are.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_waEdtuXeHg

I guess you can tell I love watching sweet potato videos. I guess cause it is my favorite thing to do in the garden, digging sweet potatoes.
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Old February 15, 2024   #17
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Thanks for the good info, seaeagle! If I grow any, I think I will try them in large black tubs for extra heat. I don't really need a big crop, just enough for a few meals.
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Old February 16, 2024   #18
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That's Seaeagle

I will find the needed spaces on one of my Farming properties to Grow Sweet Potatoes to continue this "Heart of Sweet Potatoes History from you, Amen! I Have to Preserve them here around Fort Monroe, Amen!!

How do I find Pure Historical Heirloom Sweet Potatoes?
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Old February 16, 2024   #19
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Virginia is rich in sweet potato history. Here are some old heirloom varieties from various journal sources.. You can still get most of them, I will list where you can get the slips.

Three nineteenth-century varieties that are dependable and still available are Southern Queen, Nansemond, and Hayman, which I have listed in order of popularity.

Southern Queen matures in 105 days, which is about average for most of the sweet potatoes that can adapt to a wide variety of conditions. It is a vining type that produces long, narrow tubers with white skin and white flesh. The original strain was introduced from South America in 1870.

In Southside Virginia, where this variety originated, Nansemond has been a perennial favorite since 1850, made into sweet potato pies with toasted peanuts and a little peanut flour in the pie crust. There is no better way to pass through the Great Dismal Swamp than with this culinary treat (and maybe a bottle of Virginia Gentleman) packed into one’s survival kit. Nansemond is yellow, but there is also a subvariety that is red, and an improved variety called Hanover, after the Virginia county where it was developed.

Hayman is a white-skinned white sweet potato that was developed on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. In Philadelphia, we always called it the “terrapin potato” or the “crab potato” because it was used so much in making croquettes and stews, and it is so superior to potatoes when cooked with shellfish that it is a great wonder why it is not better known. I fault the Marylanders for not sticking up for their own inventions; when cured in the sun, this sweet potato is not only highly aromatic — perfect for a crab boil — but also fragrant of cinnamon, which is not bad when it comes to making pies.

https://www.motherearthnews.com/orga...-zewz1310zpit/

More on Haymon



In 1856, while trading coffee from Brazil and fruit from the West Indies to Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Captain Dan Hayman purchased a supply of sweet potatoes at one of the West Indian Islands. A Methodist clergyman visiting the ship in Elizabeth City was attracted by the fine appearance of the potato, and so he obtained a few and propagated them. Subsequently, they spread through the networks of Methodist ministers and laymen along the Atlantic coast. By the time of the American Civil War (1861-1865) it had taken particular hold on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, as a general field crop used for both home consumption and feeding livestock in the winter.

A white-skinned, greenish-yellow-fleshed sweet potato, the Hayman has rounded, spade-like pale green foliage with purple stems. The tubers are regularly oblong, smooth, large and white and blunt at the ends, or spindle shaped. The variety bears prolifically, one reason for its quick adoption by commercial seed salesmen. Throughout the 19th century it was the earliest sweet potato grown and the easiest one to keep in winter, according to the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Its yield was normally around 650 bushels per acre on well-prepared soil; but it could grow on clay soils or in sandy loam equally well.

When baked, the flesh of the Hayman sweet potato turns dull yellow or grayish-green – not the most alluring of colors. The flavor is delicate and sweet, with a minty note that was particularly savored by people who ate sweet potatoes frequently. Yet, those who ate sweet potatoes less frequently (or just during holidays) historically opted for the more obviously sugary sweet potatoes. Northerners with a penchant for mealy, boiling sweet potatoes had a particular problem with the Hayman, judging it not of first-rank quality, while Southern markets preferred the Hayman. One feature of the Hayman that particularly distressed those not familiar with the variety was its tendency to exude sugar as a viscous black fluid at its ends while cooking. For knowledgeable producers, this was the sign that the potato has been cured to perfection, but to those unfamiliar with the Hayman, the sugar secretions suggested that the potato was coarse, had gone bad or was only good for livestock feed.

In the period from 1900 to 1910, northern agronomists and culinary writers systematically denounced the Hayman potato and other sugar-exuding white skinned varieties. In the latter decades of the 1800s it was a nationally cultivated variety, but in the 1920s, as the visual aesthetics of potatoes became important, particularly because of pie competitions, the green-yellow pallor of the Hayman’s meat was deemed less attractive than the bright orange pumpkin yams and reddish meat of other varieties, leading to a further diminution of its popularity. Eventually its cultivation and consumption were constricted to its first home in the coastal zone from the outer banks of North Carolina, tidewater Virginia, and the Eastern Shore where the taste of the potato remained the standard against which all other varieties were judged. In the 21st century, it has become the signature sweet potato of the Virginia Eastern Shore. Greatly prized locally, the potatoes also enjoy a following among consumers, many with Southern origins, in the large metropolitan areas of the northeastern United States. Labor intensive and requiring a significant amount of hand-cultivation from planting through harvest, the Hayman is a varietal that remains limited in its circulation. Current production is limited to a small group of growers who share seed stock and cultivation practices.





Purchase slips of Hayman

https://sweetpotatoesgrow.com/

https://www.southernexposure.com/pro...-sweet-potato/

https://sladefarms.com/price-list

https://www.sandhillpreservation.com...to-varieties-2

I ordered a box of sweet potatoes from the first link. Oreapeake Farms in Suffolk VA. The Prices Are good but the shipping costs are not

All for now but will post more old heirlooms mentioned in the journals of the great George Washington Carver who was the sweet potato guru of his time.


The sweet potato is considered to have been brought to the United States by Christopher Columbus from South or Central America, and was widely established by the 1700s. Records indicate the sweet potato was grown by colonists in Virginia as early as 1648. During colonial times (1492 -1763), the sweet potato was a staple food in the Southeast. The sweet potato was then used for many functions, and also as a primary ingredient in beers and breads.
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Old February 17, 2024   #20
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I forgot to add links to Southern Queen and Nansemond varieties in the prior post. Unfortunately Nansemond is cannot be located and Southern Queen is listed on Sand Hill Preservation website but is lost.

Southern Queen

Southern Queen- (Heirloom Variety) Mid-season. Vining, normal leaf, cream-white skin and flesh, average yields. Certified Organic slips, UNAVAILABLE FOR 2024. ANYONE WITH THIS PLEASE CONTACT US. WE LOST ALL IN THE DERECHO OF 2020.

That is the problem with sweet potatoes. Miss one year and they are lost forever. Seeds can last a long time. Hopefully someone has these varieties.

More taste testing

I tried White Queen and White Triumph at the same time. They were both excellent but when comparing White Triumph was much drier

Compared Covington, Copper Jewel and Beauregard at the same time.

1-Covington
2-Copper Jewel
3-Beauregard
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Old February 17, 2024   #21
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Thank You, Amen!!

I am going to till up my Husband's Burn pit area and test the soil.
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Old February 17, 2024   #22
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My Hubby said Sadly: Baby I need my Burn Pit. So I need to find another location for more Property because I just found "True Sweet Potato Heirlooms with Seaeagle's help, Amen!!!!!!!!
Going back to my old Notes from Native Americans is important, to see if their any growing secrets I need to use. I know I will have to grow different Heirloom Sweet Potatoes on each Farming Property to keep them pure.

I want to try; New Jersey Reds Sweet Potato, Old Kentucky, and Caolina Nugets. The Cooks Family Heirloom Sweet Potato has a great history I must learn of Family and Community Love, Amen!

Most Importantly, I want to try First "Chesapeake & Cherokee Sweet Potato Heirlooms this year.
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Old February 18, 2024   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsJustice View Post
My Hubby said Sadly: Baby I need my Burn Pit. So I need to find another location for more Property because I just found "True Sweet Potato Heirlooms with Seaeagle's help, Amen!!!!!!!!
Going back to my old Notes from Native Americans is important, to see if their any growing secrets I need to use. I know I will have to grow different Heirloom Sweet Potatoes on each Farming Property to keep them pure.

I want to try; New Jersey Reds Sweet Potato, Old Kentucky, and Caolina Nugets. The Cooks Family Heirloom Sweet Potato has a great history I must learn of Family and Community Love, Amen!

Most Importantly, I want to try First "Chesapeake & Cherokee Sweet Potato Heirlooms this year.

You can plant your sweet potatoes close together. They will cross pollinate but since you do not plant the seed it doesn't matter. You could always plant in straw bales if you find some that are not contaminated. Lots of videos on Youtube on how to prepare the bales.Interesting story about Carolina Nugget, I will post it after I get the George Washington Carver post up

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6zkc4szKow
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Old February 18, 2024   #24
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Here are some old Heirloom varieties from BULLETIN NO. 38 NOVEMBER 1936
By Geo. W. Carver, M.S. AGR., D.Sc., Director, Experiment Station, Tuskegee Institute

Table Varieties — Dooley Yam, Improved Dooley Yam, Triumph, Pumpkin Yam, Porto Rico and Nancy Hall.
There are but few if any of our staple farm crops receiving more attention than the sweet potato, and indeed rightfully so — the splendid service it rendered during the great World War in the saving of wheat flour, will not soon be forgotten. The 118 different and attractive products (to date) made from it, are sufficient to convince the most skeptical that we are just beginning to discover the real value and marvelous possibilities of this splendid vegetable.
Here in the South, there are but few if any farm crops that can be depended upon one year with another for satisfactory yields, as is true of the sweet potato. It is also true that most of our southern soils produce potatoes superior in quality, attractive in appearance and satisfactory in yields, as any other section of the country.
HISTORY

It is said that the early navigators of the sixteenth century recognized such a strong resemblance between the Irish potato and the sweet potato that they called them both by the same name.
They are not only botanically different but the edible parts of each are in character and taste quite unlike. Botanically, the sweet potato belongs to the morning glory family (Convolvulaceae) and has been given the technical name of Impomoeabatatas.
ORIGIN

The origin of the sweet potato is doubtful, although there is very strong evidence that it is distinctly American, as fifteen or sixteen known species of the genus Batatas are found in this country. The ‘Indian potato,” “Tuckahoe” and “Hog potato,” which grow abundantly in this country and throughout the South, are all species of this genus.
VARIETIES

More than eleven so-called varieties make up the present list, in many of which there is a distinction without a well-defined difference. Since some varieties do well in one section and practically fail in others, I have thought it wise to list none except those that have proven the most prolific and best with us.
Table Varieties — Dooley Yam, Improved Dooley Yam, Triumph, Pumpkin Yam, Porto Rico and Nancy Hall.


All of these are available at Sand Hill Preservation. Triumph, Porto Rico and Nancy Hall are available at several places. George Washington Carver tells you all you need to know about growing sweet potatoes and how to cook with them. All the information or most still holds true today,

https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/...Sweetpotatoes/

Another bulletin from 1910

https://www.nal.usda.gov/exhibits/ip...sweet-potatoes
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Old February 22, 2024   #25
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Thank you so very much. The "Straw Bales" will bring beauty to each Farming Property. I found many locations looking at this Viedo.

Thank You, Amen!
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Old March 3, 2024   #26
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A couple more sweet potato tasting videos


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFxLvdIbCW8


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EL_MoQ_EG2c
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Old June 14, 2024   #27
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40 percent off sweet potato slips

https://sowtrueseed.com/

What I received was actually rooted vine cuttings, just as good.

Sand Hill is also having a good sale, just read their news updates section
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #28
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Just wanted to update slips vs rooted vine cuttings. While the rooted vine cuttings may work perfect if you can get them fresh, they don't seem as tough and don't seem to travel as well as actual slips. I received 13 Bayou Belle and planted them and 3 have died (rotted). I don't remember ever having a slip rot. Slips are almost like wire grass, hard to kill. I kept in water until the next day and planted them. I have kept slips in water for weeks and as long as you change the water they are fine. All 6 Nancy Hall are still living. So if you are ordering slips it may be a good idea to make sure they are actual slips. If I get 10 to grow that is fine. I have plenty of spare slips.

On the other hand my experience with Heavenly Seed and the Bradshaw slips was the best They actually called and asked if I was ready for them or wanted to wait a while. These were actually slips and they did beautifully. All lived and you can't even tell the difference between them and the slips I grew and planted. Big Thumbs Up for Heavenly Seed. I will be making more purchases from that operation.

Just my opinion and someone else may have a different opinion.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seaeagle View Post
Just wanted to update slips vs rooted vine cuttings. While the rooted vine cuttings may work perfect if you can get them fresh, they don't seem as tough and don't seem to travel as well as actual slips. I received 13 Bayou Belle and planted them and 3 have died (rotted). I don't remember ever having a slip rot. Slips are almost like wire grass, hard to kill. I kept in water until the next day and planted them. I have kept slips in water for weeks and as long as you change the water they are fine. All 6 Nancy Hall are still living. So if you are ordering slips it may be a good idea to make sure they are actual slips. If I get 10 to grow that is fine. I have plenty of spare slips.

On the other hand my experience with Heavenly Seed and the Bradshaw slips was the best They actually called and asked if I was ready for them or wanted to wait a while. These were actually slips and they did beautifully. All lived and you can't even tell the difference between them and the slips I grew and planted. Big Thumbs Up for Heavenly Seed. I will be making more purchases from that operation.

Just my opinion and someone else may have a different opinion.
I agree with you about heavenly seed,they were very nice slips and very good customer service,I'll also be ordering from them again if these produce well! It certainly won't be the slips fault if they don't do well,my soil is very rich and I've read that sweet potatoes don't like rich soil,so we'll see what happens!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #30
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Here are tips for growing sweet potatoes from Sand Hill. Also some good info for growing in cooler climates.I think I posted this before but doesn't hurt to post it again since it is spot on.



SWEET POTATO TIPS FOR SUCCESS



First: Forget what climate zone you are in. That has nothing to do with growing annuals, that is for over wintering plants. Parts of coastal Alaska are in zone 7b. Here in Iowa we are in zone 4b. If we set out plants in the garden on the same day in both places it is almost certain the folks in Alaska will not have anywhere near the success we will have here.



Second: Do not set the plants out when it is very cool. They hate cold and just sit there shivering and waiting for heat. Do whatever you can to make it warm and toasty for them and they will reward you.



Third: You do not need lots of roots on the slips when you plant them to be able to insure success. The more roots the more stress when transplanting and the more they will be stunted. The key when setting out the slips is to have very few roots and keep them as wet as possible in the garden for the first 7 to 10 days. Then back off on the water and they will go crazy. The worst possible thing you can do upon receipt of the slips is to pot them up, wait a few weeks and then transplant to the garden. You will have lost a good 2 weeks of positive growth and will have given them two chances to slow down. The more you slow them down the less yield you have. The more times you transplant them the more non-uniform roots and the less roots you will get. You will frequently get one ball shaped twisted root from plants that have been repotted in pots and then transplanted into the garden.



Fourth: This is the most important thing when it comes to sweet potatoes. It is the heat units that determines success, not the number of days nor plant zone, but heat units. I have been an avid weather observer for over 40 years and have files of weather data to go with files of planting data. A few years ago , thanks to the help of one of our workers, I was able to put the two sets of data together and arrive at some conclusions that I had already suspected, but had never had the time to confirm. It takes about 1200 heat units for our early varieties to reach a decent crop of usable size roots. I use the term usable size as I think for many a sweet potato the size of a nice fat bratwurst is about the best size for keeping and for baking. Bigger than that is okay, but they do not sprout as well nor keep as well because they suffer from bruising much easier. The question you must then ask yourself is: “How is 1200 heat units determined?” I offer the following examples. To get heat units you take the day’s high temperature (maximum) and the day’s low temperature (minimum) and add them together. Then divide by 2 and subtract 55 from that. That gives you the heat units.



Example 1. Daytime high (maximum) 75 deg. F, night time low (minimum) 45 deg. F. Add those together and divide by 2 you get 120/2 or 60. Subtract 55 and you get 5 heat units. If that is your typical summer, then you will need 240 frost free days to get a crop. It doesn’t take a genius to realize that if you have summertime days like that, you are probably not going to have 240 frost free days because that is 8 months.



Example 2. Daytime high of 90 deg. F, night time low of 70 deg. F. That gives you a heat unit for the day of 25 which is just about perfect for maximum growth. Heat units per day greater than 25 seem to have more of a negative impact because of the massive amount of water lost through transpiration. If you can keep 25 heat units a day, then you only need about 48 days to get some useable roots. This is pushing it a bit as there are some limits to daily plant growth. The best growth I have ever seen here is planting around July 18 and having a decent crop by our first frost of October 2, which is about 76 days. By no means do we have temperatures that are perfect for growth each day here in Iowa, but hopefully this shows some data that can help you determine if you can grow a crop.



Fifth: For those who have read the above information and feel that it is now hopeless for them to try to grow sweet potatoes, I offer the following challenge. You can “alter” your heat units in a cold climate. The only way I was able to grow much the three years I spent in the Panhandle of Northern Idaho, where nighttime temperatures got down to the 30’s most nights, was to trick or alter the environment. I used lodge pole pine saplings and made an A frame structure and covered it with plastic. I then enclosed both ends, only opening the ends on the hottest of days and faithfully closing the ends every night. There, the average daytime high was around 80 deg. F in the summer and around 40 deg. F at night, in other words about 5 heat units a day for most days. By using the A frame plastic enclosures, I could get it up to 95 deg. F in there in the daytime and keep it at around 55 deg. F at night without any supplemental heat source. Therefore, I could get 20 heat units a day instead of 5. I never had the courage to try sweet potatoes there, but by using this method I was successful with melons, tomatoes, and cucumbers that otherwise were either impossible or close to a miracle. You can speed it up even more with planting on black plastic, something I never had access to at that time . Living here in Iowa there are no lodge pole pines so a similar structure could be made out of stiff number 9 wire or, if you are talented, plastic electrical conduit.


https://www.sandhillpreservation.com...ng-information

Here is a chart I found interesting on stages of development of the sweet potato

https://keys.lucidcentral.org/keys/s...evelopment.htm
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