Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 1, 2017   #16
Nan_PA_6b
Tomatovillian™
 
Nan_PA_6b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,499
Default

Thank you, Salt, although my must-try list is too long already. I've read good things about Porter; it's in the spreadsheet. Haven't noticed any plants struggling with the heat here (yet), but the good shelf life, shade & drought tolerance are attractive.

Nan
Nan_PA_6b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 2, 2017   #17
MarlynnMarcks
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Port St Lucie, Florida
Posts: 180
Default Carmello and Sioux are not determinate in my experience

Quote:
Originally Posted by oakley View Post
You didn't mention why you are looking for determinate. Or what
you were hoping to find. A big blaster pumping out fruit over a
shorter time frame for sauce?

Yet I suppose the frustrating search is the main reason for the rant.
(information not as clear as expected)

Did not realize Carmello, Glacier, and Sioux were listed as determinate.
I did give them three strikes, three seasons. (Sioux maybe once)
They must be listed as ind or semi most places. I only grow ind.
All three were a disappointment in flavor for us.

In my short growing season every plant pumps out fruit mid August.
So I look for early mid-season, (not early-early-mediocre-just-so-i-have
-a-few)...by 4th of July.
I want good taste, quantity not important. A few like SunGold keep me
satisfied early. Now starting to grow some indoors for a jump start.

Maybe rephrase the question to 'does anyone grow determinates and
have a variety that grows true to form...mid-season, lots of fruit over
a two-three week time frame?'. My neighbor only grows paste for sauce.
No interest in anything but sauce. Thick boil-all-day sauce.

I know, I know,...you just want some clear answers.
I'm not much help,
I grew both Camello and Sioux and they were ind, not determinate. Carmello had a different taste than the usual red tomato but it was good. I also made oodles of tomatoes even in inhospitable ground with minimum sun. Sioux produced all season, too and had excellent sweet flavor.
MarlynnMarcks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 6, 2017   #18
Salaam
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 105
Default

I've been wondering the same thing as you, Nan!

My requirements are a short bush plant to grow on my front yard, plus I'd like it to produce for as long as possible. I've grown Bush Champion for two or three years, and it's supposed to be a determinate. It has produced for me all season - from early August till hard frost - early to mid October. It has fulfilled my requirements. But the taste is, well, not that good.

I'm looking for other varieties, but have run into the same problem as you in that it's not clear whether they produce once only or all season. I was thinking of trying Rosella Purple. Anybody with experience growing this?
Salaam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 6, 2017   #19
FarmerShawn
Tomatovillian™
 
FarmerShawn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Vermont
Posts: 737
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Salaam View Post
I've been wondering the same thing as you, Nan!

My requirements are a short bush plant to grow on my front yard, plus I'd like it to produce for as long as possible. I've grown Bush Champion for two or three years, and it's supposed to be a determinate. It has produced for me all season - from early August till hard frost - early to mid October. It has fulfilled my requirements. But the taste is, well, not that good.

I'm looking for other varieties, but have run into the same problem as you in that it's not clear whether they produce once only or all season. I was thinking of trying Rosella Purple. Anybody with experience growing this?


I would suggest almost any of the dwarf varieties from the Dwarf Project for a plant that would fit your needs. I grow Rosella Purple every year because the flavor is usually outstanding, though production may not be huge. Production is ok, just not overwhelming, but that flavor makes it well worth my garden space.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
__________________
"Red meat is NOT bad for you. Now blue-green meat, THAT'S bad for you!"
-- Tommy Smothers
FarmerShawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 6, 2017   #20
Nan_PA_6b
Tomatovillian™
 
Nan_PA_6b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,499
Default

Farmer Shawn, do you know if all of the dwarfs in the Dwarf Project are long-bearing?

Nan

Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerShawn View Post
I would suggest almost any of the dwarf varieties from the Dwarf Project for a plant that would fit your needs. I grow Rosella Purple every year because the flavor is usually outstanding, though production may not be huge. Production is ok, just not overwhelming, but that flavor makes it well worth my garden space.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Nan_PA_6b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 6, 2017   #21
Black Krim
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: New England
Posts: 592
Default

Thanks Nan for posting the question. I too have the same question.

My Roma and San Marano came into bearing at the same time, after a long rainy spring became a 2 m drought, and the massive number of fruit pulled over every staked plant. As I remember Roma is det and San m is indeter. Harvested both at the same time , for same length of time.

I would grow both, but will limit myself to the first packet I find.

Last edited by Black Krim; December 6, 2017 at 06:30 PM. Reason: Spelling, still i ncorrect
Black Krim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 6, 2017   #22
Nan_PA_6b
Tomatovillian™
 
Nan_PA_6b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,499
Default

So both Roma and SM are long-bearing? I'll update my list.

Nan
Nan_PA_6b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 6, 2017   #23
Gerardo
Tomatovillian™
 
Gerardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: San Diego-Tijuana
Posts: 2,539
Default

the determinates I've grown produce a 2nd harvest, and in some cases a 3rd. If you feed them aggressively it helps to increase the size of the second wave, you can also ignore size and dry farm the 2nd wave. Helps to improve the flavor on those marginal ones
Gerardo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 7, 2017   #24
Nan_PA_6b
Tomatovillian™
 
Nan_PA_6b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,499
Default

Wow, Gerardo, that's another confounding variable. BTW, does anyone know how New Big Dwarf produces? Is it a constant production or flush after flush?

Nan
Nan_PA_6b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 7, 2017   #25
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 12,203
Default

Gerardo, the same happens here. The best example I have is Bradley. On some sites it is called a Determinate, and other sites call it Semi-Determinate. It grew and produced as you would expect a Semi-DET variety to produce. We were very happy with the taste, but the shelf life was but a few days.

Nan, from my experience, Campari F2 have a very long shelf life. Japanese Pink Cherry also does. Carolyn told me that Japanese Pink Cherry used to be a hybrid. Neither are Determinates, but both produce a lot of tomatoes, and have an even longer shelf life than the Porters I offered seeds for earlier in this thread. I could easily see the Campari F2s being used as a mild sauce or salsa tomato. The Japanese Pink Cherry is like most Pink tomatoes - eat um while you got um. I guess you can tell that my favorite tomatoes are Pink When Ripe.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 7, 2017   #26
Gerardo
Tomatovillian™
 
Gerardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: San Diego-Tijuana
Posts: 2,539
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Salaam View Post
I've been wondering the same thing as you, Nan!

My requirements are a short bush plant to grow on my front yard, plus I'd like it to produce for as long as possible. I've grown Bush Champion for two or three years, and it's supposed to be a determinate. It has produced for me all season - from early August till hard frost - early to mid October. It has fulfilled my requirements. But the taste is, well, not that good.

I'm looking for other varieties, but have run into the same problem as you in that it's not clear whether they produce once only or all season. I was thinking of trying Rosella Purple. Anybody with experience growing this?
Rosella purple shines on the flavor front. Tasmanian Choc, although slightly taller, gets an enthusiastic thumbs up too. Gribovsky works great for me
Gerardo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 7, 2017   #27
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 12,203
Default

Sorry, I got interrupted in r/l on that last post.

I have wondered about New Big Dwarf too. I couldn't grow it myself due to the soil diseases. Did you know that New Big Dwarf comes from the early 1900s?
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 7, 2017   #28
KarenO
Tomatovillian™
 
KarenO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 4,740
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nan_PA_6b View Post
Wow, Gerardo, that's another confounding variable. BTW, does anyone know how New Big Dwarf produces? Is it a constant production or flush after flush?

Nan
New big dwarf is a dwarf indeterminate. A large dwarf plant about 4 feet tall. I found it great tasting, late mid season. An ancestor of many of the dwarf project tomatoes.
KarenO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 7, 2017   #29
oakley
Tomatovillian™
 
oakley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NewYork 5a
Posts: 2,044
Default

Nan, the dwarf project dwarfs, like most indeterminate, have some early varieties,
mid season, and late. My limited experience, once they get going, continue rather
steady.

dPinkPassion was very early, one of the first, but succumbed to some disease.
dArticRose was not far behind and did well most of the season yet best production was early..
dTennSuited and
dKangarooPawBrown, both excellent in flavor, were both mid-late and steady
producers once the heat let up late August.
dArticRose is a cross between 'Budai Torpe' and 'Black from Tula', listed as a true determinate.
You could probably find pics and development discussions doing a search in the
'Grumpy' archives. 2010 maybe?

I also grew two dozen dwarf hunt, F2's, and F3's. What I like about the dwarfs is
the size. More variety tomatoes in such a small footprint. Self pruning, not bushy.
(except for dArticRose...semi-bushy)
A 25ft run a foot apart in one and 2 gal grow bags. I should note, on my deck, single
row, I had great airflow. I intentionally wanted more variety over big production.
2018 I will scale back quantity, larger pots, and concentrate on a few but more of each
variety. 6-8 Metallica, maybe 2-3 each of the others with great flavor.

Victory Seed supply has a good listing of dwarfs and good descriptions. Easy to
navigate. All in one place.
oakley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 7, 2017   #30
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,123
Default

Not sure why there's a confusion. All determinates produce fairly concentrated crops, it's just some of them (most) will produce another concentrated crop later (and another one if your season is long enough).
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:18 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★