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Historical background information for varieties handed down from bygone days.

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Old May 22, 2010   #1
333.okh
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Default Odd Russian Types?

I started just a plant each of these:

Minskly Rannij from Belarus
Sibirskiy Skorospelyi from Siberia


Anyone know anything about them?

All I know is less than 68 days and DET.
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Old May 22, 2010   #2
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http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/S...iy_Skorospelyi

Not sure if this is your other one (not much info, anyway):

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Minusinskij_Rannij
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Old May 22, 2010   #3
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Yes, the second one is correct. It's just that there are slight alternative spellings for some of the CIS varieties.

Andrey lists the second one in the SSE YEarbook and gives both spellings and I'll just shorten his description to a small round red, det, the name means Early From Minsk, and it's a commercial type developed in Minsk.

Andrey also introduced the first one to the SSE YEarbook and it's also a standard commercial type commercial variety.

Neither are what I think most of us would call Legacy varieties if you look at most of the other threads in this Forum, but at least you know more about them and that's good.

Short term memory problem here but I think I remember that one or both are also listed at Jeff Casey's website where he sells seeds and I forgot to see if Tania herself sells seeds for either one but I didn't think so, Jeff posts here as well and his website is;

http://members.shaw.ca/jwlcasey/Case...toes/Home.html

Both Andrey and Tatiana post here at Tville, and both have introduced many many wonderful varieties to the SSE YEarbook. And for quite a few years now Andrey has been sending seeds to a few of us each year and some that I list in the SSE YEarbook are from him and since I also make a free seed offer here at Tville, or have been, you'll see in my list quite a few from Andrey.

One of the most outstanding recent ones, I think, is Orange Minsk, which Andrey found at a farmer's market in Minsk. he collects seeds from many places in the CIS and Europe, some heirlooms but mostly commercial varieties and also helps out lots of folks here at Tville, as does Tatiana, with interpreting Russian language and othe variety names. One example is if you read the current thread in the General Discussion Forum titled Ukrainian Sabre.

I'm growing out I think 3 more from Andrey this year and the one where he collected seeds from a farmer's market in Tula, looks especially interesting to me.

It might be a very good idea for you to save Tatiana's webpage to your faves b'c she has info there for about 3,000 varieties and that's always expanding and she's always trying to update what's there.

And those of us who are SSE members also can usually find some lesser known varieties in our annual Yearbooks.
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Old May 22, 2010   #4
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I raised both last year and am raising Sib/Skor this year. Minskiy Ranniy is a small plant that produced large red cherry sized fruit. Sib/Skor is determinate plant that I grew in a 5 gallon bucket and also a 3 gallon black nursery pot. The Sib/Skor is a wonderful variety that produces lots and lots of red slicer-sized toms and was still growing and setting fruit last year when the first frost got it (Northeast GA, USA).

This year I did not plant Min/Ran, but have 6 Sib/Skor plants in the garden. It is a great producer and the flavor is not only good on sandwiches and salads, but is great for sauces and salsa as well.

Keep it watered and feed it MG and then sit back and enjoy the harvest. I also found that it was somewhat resistant to fungal diseases. It was not the last, but definitely not the first to show fusarium wilt.

I edited to include some pictures from last year.

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Attached Images
File Type: jpg Front1.JPG (134.6 KB, 54 views)
File Type: jpg SibirSkor2.JPG (100.8 KB, 57 views)
File Type: jpg SibSkor.JPG (78.2 KB, 64 views)
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Old May 22, 2010   #5
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These 2 vareities both came from old Soviet times and are CVs.

Minusinskiy Ranniy (which is on that link at Tania's base) and Minskiy Ranniy are two different varieties.
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Old May 23, 2010   #6
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I am most interested in some of these colder climate tomatoes. We still have rain here in Northern California and tonight it is in the 30s F temps.
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Old May 23, 2010   #7
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Originally Posted by 333.okh View Post
I am most interested in some of these colder climate tomatoes. We still have rain here in Northern California and tonight it is in the 30s F temps.
Here's a couple of suggestions.

If you go to the Seed and plant sources here you'll see a sticky at the top of that Forum.

There are two places where short season varieties are lumped together in one link at both places and that's a good place to start so you know the names of the varieties and can then search at Tatiana's website for more info about them and at Jeff's site read the blurbs for them.

So the links you need at Tatiana's T base and Casey's Heirloom tomatoes and both links are in that sticky I just referred you to.

Another suggestion is to look at the lists of varieties folks here post, usually for trading, but seldom do they describe the varieties, so it's important to know which ones interest you. Most of the trading is done in the Jan to march time span.

Some folks, like myself, are not interested in trades so post free seed offers in the Seed Trades subforum.

And then if you can't find a seed source from the two places I referred you to and you can't find a source otherwise by Googling, then after you know the variety names you can post in the Seeds Wanted subforum.

Ultimately the largest number of short season varieties will be found in the SSE YEarbook and at some point you might even consider a membership, which not only helps the SSE mission of rpeservation of OP varieties but also gives you access to many many short season varieties and in a post above I mentioned all the listings of both Tania and Andrey as well as others in the Yearbook.

Hope that helps.
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Old May 23, 2010   #8
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That does help and I do have some of the dwarfs coming as well that are of Russian/Belarus origin. Stupice is doing great despite the 6 inches or rain and two frosts in the last two weeks. Guernsey Pink Blush is doing okay.
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Old June 21, 2010   #9
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Don't know if this is odd, but can't find alot of info on it, just a few things. Orange Minsk, my first year with these and I am havin a great time...mega blooms and large fruits, the one in the pic is already 7 inches in diameter!
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Old June 21, 2010   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 333.okh View Post
I started just a plant each of these:

Minskly Rannij from Belarus
Sibirskiy Skorospelyi from Siberia


Anyone know anything about them?

All I know is less than 68 days and DET.

Ya know, I love the Russian Types these sound so interesting, I find that they can withstand temps of 35-40deg....and my Russian type this year is thriving in extreme heat.....
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Old June 21, 2010   #11
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Originally Posted by Love my garden View Post


Don't know if this is odd, but can't find alot of info on it, just a few things. Orange Minsk, my first year with these and I am havin a great time...mega blooms and large fruits, the one in the pic is already 7 inches in diameter!
Dinah, Orange Minsk isn't a legacy variety yet, as in historical backgrounds, etc., which is what most of the threads in this Forum are all about, but I sure hope in a few decades it might be a legacy one except there's no historical information for this variety.

I sent you the seeds for Orange Minsk. It's a variety that Andrey from Minsk, Belarus found at a local farmer's market and sent seeds to several of us, no other info is available. I offered it in my free seed off here at Tville the past two years, also listed it in the SSE YEarbook, as did Andrey and in the 2010 SSE YEarbook there are now quite a few who are listing it, and I also sent it for trial at several seed sites I trust and know well, and lots of folks love it. Indet, RL and late midseason, large orange beefsteaks with excellent taste.

The fruit you show in your picture looks like it came from what's called a megabloom or fasciated bloom, as you noted, which is why it has all those lobes. Many varieties have those large fasciated blossom early in the season, as you know, and then regular blooms follow. There's nothing wrong with the eating qualities of such fruits, but it's best not to save seeds from them since there's more likely to be Cross pollinated seeds b'c of the several individual blossoms that fuse eventually to form one fruit.

You'll find lots and lots of threads that have information about varieties from the former USSR in the General Discussion Forum, so if interested, do take a look, not just with what's there now, but a search also brings up lots more varieties.

The one there now where such varieties are being discussed is the one started by Dmitry, aka Duh Vinci, where quite a few varieties have been discussed.

Good Growing.
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Old June 21, 2010   #12
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Oh hey Carolyn, I have enjoyed these tomatoes so much, thanks for the info, and the seeds, again!....I can't wait to eat the one in the pic!!!! I documented the entire growth of this plant, from germination to growth habits, fruit set....Ya know Carolyn, you mention that the regular blooms come after the megablooms, will take some pics and send them to you, I am impressed because, this plant just keeps producing the mega blooms! It has been interesting and a true learning experience....Take care, Dinah
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Old June 21, 2010   #13
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Side note to Dr Carolyn....thanks so much for Jeff's site.
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Old June 21, 2010   #14
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Side note to Dr Carolyn....thanks so much for Jeff's site.
Please callme Carolyn as I've signed of for every post I've made online since 1989. Besides, I'm retired now.

In addition, to JEff Casey's site I hope you also have Tatiana's site where she lists information about many many varieties from everywhere and breaks it down as to country, fruit shape, early, etc. She also sells seeds and is also based in Canada but sells seed to lots of folka in the US and many other countries. Tania also posts here at Tville as does Jeff.

her website follows and there's info for over 3000 tomato varieties:

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/T...itage_Tomatoes
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