Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating eggplants/aubergines.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 20, 2009   #1
mensplace
Tomatovillian™
 
mensplace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 1,008
Default Eggplants that do not soak up so much oil?

I had read somewhere that eggplants from the east have a flesh that is dense. This would be a great feature for me as it seems most absorb oil or other fluids like a sponge. Combine that with bitterness and thick skins and the wife won't touch the stuff! SO, Your recommmendations if there are varities that meet such needs. I love eggplants, but not bitter, oil filled sponges whether stir fried or otherwise.
mensplace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 20, 2009   #2
TomNJ
Tomatovillian™
 
TomNJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Floyd VA
Posts: 685
Default

I don't know about dense fleshed eggplants, but one way to get around the oil sponge problem is to microwave them instead of frying.

Frying makes such a mess, and the eggplant tastes more like oil and breading than eggplant. I just peel mine with a potato peeler, slice into 3/8 ' thick slices, and lightly brush them on both sides with extra virgin olive oil. Then layer them two slices deep on a large plate and microwave them until soft, about 8-10 minutes. When done this way you can taste the fresh eggplant as well as the fruity olive oil and they are absolutely delicious!

Once cooked they are ready to use in your favorite dish, or layer them between sheets of wax paper in a Tupperware bowl and freeze them for later use.

Fast, easy, tasty, and no mess - what else can you ask for.

TomNJ
TomNJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 20, 2009   #3
Duh_Vinci
Tomatovillian™
 
Duh_Vinci's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Locust Grove, VA
Posts: 295
Default

Someone suggested to me long time ago to do what Tom mentioned, microwave them. Reluctant at first, but I did try, and it works, works well indeed.

Though my preferred method is oven. Thinly sliced on mandolin lengthwise, brushed with a little olive oil, seasoning to taste.

I still fry them too sometimes, and the only work around I know is: Slice them, lay flat on the countertop, sprinkle a little sea salt, flip over and sprinkle with a little salt also. What that does, it makes them sweat, and after 20-30 min they are ready to fry and do not absorb as much oil as freshly sliced.

Regards,
D
Duh_Vinci is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 20, 2009   #4
mensplace
Tomatovillian™
 
mensplace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 1,008
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duh_Vinci View Post
Someone suggested to me long time ago to do what Tom mentioned, microwave them. Reluctant at first, but I did try, and it works, works well indeed.Though my preferred method is oven. Thinly sliced on mandolin lengthwise, brushed with a little olive oil, seasoning to taste. I still fry them too sometimes, and the only work around I know is: Slice them, lay flat on the countertop, sprinkle a little sea salt, flip over and sprinkle with a little salt also. What that does, it makes them sweat, and after 20-30 min they are ready to fry and do not absorb as much oil as freshly sliced.Regards, D
With two heart stints and two strokes, you would think I would have thought of that a LONG time ago, but always cooked eggplants the way of my Sicilian sister in law or stir fried. Thanks to both of you for a great idea.
mensplace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 20, 2009   #5
dokutaaguriin
Tomatovillian™
 
dokutaaguriin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada Z3a
Posts: 896
Default

Japanese eggplants will fit the bill as they are much juicier than the Italian varieties.
Jeff
dokutaaguriin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 21, 2009   #6
habitat_gardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: California
Posts: 2,371
Default

I know what you mean about the oil. I don't cook with oil, and the last time I ordered eggplant in a restaurant it was made with so much oil that I felt a little sick afterward.

I always make eggplant by slicing at least 3/4 inch thick, then baking in the oven until it's soft. I don't add any oil or salt. Often I make baba ghanouj with baked eggplant, by adding lemon juice, garlic, and sesame paste (tahini). It's like hummus, but with eggplant instead of garbanzo beans, and is used the same way, as a sandwich spread, dip, etc.
habitat_gardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20, 2012   #7
bzzybee
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: South Florida
Posts: 15
Default

My mom used to slice them, layer in cotton towel in a bowl, weigh down with another bowl. Did the trick of drying them out for easier frying.
bzzybee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20, 2012   #8
Redbaron
Tomatovillian™
 
Redbaron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 4,478
Default

You fry them and then complain about oil? Sorry but the obvious solution is to change the recipe. Egg Plant can be cooked so many delicious ways!

The other part about being bitter....growing conditions affect bitterness. Late season or eggplant with excessive seeds or grown when there is excessive rain all can change the bitterness significantly. A pinch of sugar can solve that issue.
__________________
Scott

AKA The Redbaron

"Permaculture is a philosophy of working with, rather than against nature; of protracted & thoughtful observation rather than protracted & thoughtless labour; & of looking at plants & animals in all their functions, rather than treating any area as a single-product system."
Bill Mollison
co-founder of permaculture
Redbaron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20, 2012   #9
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 33,836
Default

I hate to say iit but you have to fry egg plant right to not be oily.

Dust or flip in corn starch dip in egg wash flip in bread crumbs fry in hot peanut oil.

Bread crumbs are preferred because they brown sooner and you don't over cook the egg. plant
If done correctly they arent greasy and if picked small not bitter.

Just like squash pick before the seeds are mature.

The larger ones should be picked before the inner stem gets so hard you have to have wire cutters to harvest them.

Cook with tomatoes and onion in shallow pan without oil.
Start oinions first then the egg plant and tomatoes.

Use peppers and garlic if desired.

Just remember always put the tomatoes and egg plant in last and don't over cook.

To draw water from egg plant cover slices in salt for a while and then rinse the salt off.
This makes a better product.
It wil have the consistency of leather then cook in your favorite recipe.

Just but a few of the things I do with egg plant.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
If Count Dracula grow tomatoes they would be black tomatoes.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 10, 2014   #10
raindrops27
Tomatovillian™
 
raindrops27's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: long island
Posts: 328
Default

Oven fry for healthier version. Slice, dredge spray cookie sheet with Pam then bake you can use anything to dredge I prefer seasoned Italian bread crumbs. 400 degrees for 10 to 15 minutes until you see things getting crisp and that's pretty much it! I definitely would stop frying if I had stints and you won't miss the crunchiness from the frying oil. Make it for the wife she may like it!
raindrops27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 10, 2014   #11
KarenO
Tomatovillian™
 
KarenO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 4,441
Default

Pick them small and young. All varieties are dry and pithy if too mature.
Karen
KarenO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 10, 2014   #12
Wi-sunflower
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,496
Default

What Worth said about frying, with emphasis on the HOT oil. So hot that the oil is to the point of smoking. You want that crust to crisp up as soon as it hits the pan then it won't soak up so much oil.

Many people don't "fry" things in a hot enough pan. That's why stuff soaks up too much oil.

As far as the bitter goes -- FRESH should not be bitter. Fresh right from the garden. But eggplant looses moisture fast compared to many vegies and when it's "old", as in from the grocery store, it will be somewhat soft and could be bitter. Eggplant also bruises much easier than most other vegies so you don't want a fruit with any decernable soft spots compared with the rest of the fruit.

A way to tell if your eggplant is fresh if you didn't pick it yourself -- are there small almost invisible spines on the caylix ?? People that only get their eggplant from the store are always surprised at the farmers markets when the eggplant "bite" them. Those spines fall off about 4 days after they are picked and about the time the eggplant are loosing moisture.

JMO,
Carol

Last edited by Wi-sunflower; January 10, 2014 at 08:12 AM. Reason: added thought
Wi-sunflower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 10, 2014   #13
Patihum
Tomatovillian™
 
Patihum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Southeast Kansas
Posts: 785
Default

We started grilling them this summer and really enjoyed them. Just a little olive oil drizzled on so they don't stick to the grill. You can also just sear them quickly over a hot fire, let them cool and freeze for a taste of summer when the snow flies. Doesn't take but a minute in the microwave to finish cooking them.
Patihum is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:23 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★