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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #16
rhines81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcgrady View Post
I have Pasilla Bajio, Mulato Islano, Ancho San Luis and Guajillo dried peppers from last season, sounds like I need to grind a few and start mixing them.
Or reconstitute and blenderize them with some chicken stock. I grew those varieties too except for the San Luis... yum yum!
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #17
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Originally Posted by Father'sDaughter View Post
I've seen many dishes that call for sofrito as their flavor base, but I've never heard of a Mexican "Holy Trinity." And if you go hunting for sofrito recipes, you'll find hundreds of variations from several different countries.
I've always associated Sofrito with Caribbean cuisine.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #18
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Originally Posted by Gerardo View Post
No such thing, cuisine too diverse due to geography.

Depends on what your target is. Use them all, your palate will lead the way
Agreed and it is a long journey of sampling and mixing.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #19
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned chili arbol it is a very popular chili, a household staple.

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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #20
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I tried to grow Chile Arbol too but only got a couple of measly green peppers off it.
I used a dried Italian Pepperoncini and a dried red Guerito together for the pepper flakes in my Gambas al Ajillo yesterday... om nom nom. The heat and flavor was perfect to me.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #21
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Pointless to grow any of these peppers mentioned here they are cheaper than dirt in bulk at the Mexican stores.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #22
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Here's a few that may help sort our names, they change from fresh to dry.

PS. let's not forget Chiltepín!
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Last edited by Gerardo; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:13 PM.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #23
AlittleSalt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Pointless to grow any of these peppers mentioned here they are cheaper than dirt in bulk at the Mexican stores.
Yes, peppers are very cheap here too. Dried or fresh.

I also use Fiesta brand and if I had to pick a 'Holy Trinity' for cooking Mexican/TexMex - It would be Garlic Powder, Onion Powder, and Comino/Cumin.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #24
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Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
Yes, peppers are very cheap here too. Dried or fresh.

I also use Fiesta brand and if I had to pick a 'Holy Trinity' for cooking Mexican/TexMex - It would be Garlic Powder, Onion Powder, and Comino/Cumin.
Ironically none of those are native to the Americas.

If I were to pick a holey trinity for Mexico it would be Maize/corn, chilies and tomatoes.
Maize by far is the number one thing people of many parts of Mexico live on.
They even have a book Men Of Maize/Hombres De Maize.


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Last edited by Worth1; 2 Weeks Ago at 06:59 PM.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerardo View Post
Here's a few that may help sort our names, they change from fresh to dry.

PS. let's not forget Chiltepín!
Nice find Gerardo !
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Ironically none of those are native to the Americas.

If I were to pick a holey trinity for Mexico it would be Maize/corn, chilies and tomatoes.
Maize by far is the number one thing people of many parts of Mexico live on.
They even have a book Men Of Maize/Hombres De Maize.


Worth
I did find that Chile Peppers, Corn and Beans (not tomatoes) has been mentioned as the trinity in a few Mexican cooking references.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #27
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Originally Posted by rhines81 View Post
I did find that Chile Peppers, Corn and Beans (not tomatoes) has been mentioned as the trinity in a few Mexican cooking references.
Yes I was considering going back and changing it to beans but since this is a tomato forum.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #28
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Wish I could grow the peppers I use in my Chili mix, but the growing season simply isn't long enough here. Chili Arbol, which are ridiculously cheap and I get more than I can use so not really worth growing; Cascabel Chilis, and Anchos. I can grow the Poblano, but they don't have enough time to ripen, so I just get the green ones. The dried Ancho I use are a dark purple, I assume from fully ripe Poblanos. So I will have to continue to buy them dried. The nice large Anchos and the Cascabels are much more expensive then the Arbol and I wish I could grow them myself. I use them mostly for the flavor and the Arbol add a little heat.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #29
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Cool pepper posters, Gerardo! (Or should I say, HOT!!)
Maybe the Mirasol I grew was mislabeled.

Since I grew no peppers this year, I bought a jar of pickled peppers at the store. Ridiculous amount of peppers for a couple of bucks, when I think of the months I spent fawning over my little plants and filling my house with them and fighting aphids fungus gnats and.....
But then I tasted the pickles. They were like mush.

So I would grow some sweets and a few hots at least for fresh use and for a few pickles, which can't be compared to the junk I can buy.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #30
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I am limited to bell peppers and jalapenos at my grocery. Banana peppers are only sold jarred. On rare occasion, I see poblanos. Even the powdered pepper selection is limited. The nearest Mexican grocery that offers fresh produce is an hour away. A good price for bells (green) is $0.85 each and Jalapenos can be had for around $0.35 each. If I were picky and insisted on organic labeled, the price doubles. Anyhow, even if they were $0.10 each, I would still grow my own - to me it is the satisfaction of eating something from the 'fruits' of my labor.
If I were to value my time versus the price of the product I raised - I'd be a Maine lobster farmer!
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