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Old July 22, 2017   #31
Hntrss
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But , Long Island has way more mild winters than upstate. We can get good cold snaps, there is always hope
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Old July 22, 2017   #32
RayR
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But , Long Island has way more mild winters than upstate. We can get good cold snaps, there is always hope
I missed that part about you living on Long Island.
You're right, that's a very different climate from what we have upstate.
So you can have Fusarium or Verticillium and you could have RKN.

Read this from Cornell: Growing Tomatoes in the Long Island Garden
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Old July 22, 2017   #33
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Ray, you live near Buffalo NY. Wow you must see a lot of snow...90+ inches? If it snowed 9 inches here - we would seriously be homebound. ...help...lol

Hntress, I missed the part about you being in the Long Island area too. It was around 92F there today.

I've never been to Long Island, but the space you are growing in could look really great with some containers growing tomatoes. Containers don't have to be boring plastic. You can buy or make some to show off to the world. You did say it is a hobby growing tomatoes. The containers can steal the show
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Old July 22, 2017   #34
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I'm have for some time suspected landscaping companies spreading disease.
Not only soil they buy but plants.

What about some of the bagged soils in the big box stores?

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Old July 22, 2017   #35
gorbelly
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Of course Carolyn is right, Fusarium is extremely rare in NYS. The only real Fusarium infections I've read about were in some soybean fields in a few counties in central New York. So you have to wonder how Fusarium got there in the first place since it's an organism that's not native to the North and can't survives really cold winters.
It's far more likely to get Verticillium Wilt in the North than Fusarium.
It's unusual, but I wouldn't say "extremely rare". I suspect it's underreported in tomatoes because tomatoes aren't an important commercial crop in NY State.

Fusarium is actually more common than vert in some areas, such as Long Island.

Upstate I'm sure it's much rarer, but if the soil is sandy, the chances increase.

Fusarium can survive freezing temperatures. They find it alive in the arctic. And it can survive in soil for 30 years or more.

The thing that keeps it from being a problem up north is that we rarely get enough days with warm enough soil to produce disease in tomatoes, but this is changing. I suspect we will not be able to remain complacent about fusarium much longer.

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And this RKN thing. Root Knot Nematodes are root feeding nematodes but there are many many species of root feeding nematodes that are not RKN's. RKN's are species in the genus Meloidogyne, They are not adapted to Northern climates with long frigid winters. They thrive in very hot climates down South. If they were to show up in the North at all they would have to have been imported from the South in contaminated soil.
Meloidogyne hapla is a RKN species that survives deep freezes. That's why it's called Northern Root Knot Nematode. And, yes, tomato is a host. It's all over the north. It tends to do less damage than Southern RKNs, but if you also have a soilborne disease organism in your soil, obviously, it's going to be a problem.

Plants that are resistant to southern RKN will not be resistant to northern RKN, so the best way to deal with it is to select resistance for whatever soil disease you have. The northern RKN on its own won't do quite as much damage (yield loss is typically about half the yield loss from comparable conditions with southern RKN).
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Old July 22, 2017   #36
RayR
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Ray, you live near Buffalo NY. Wow you must see a lot of snow...90+ inches? If it snowed 9 inches here - we would seriously be homebound. ...help...lol
Even 1" of snow and your towns and cities are crippled. Sissies
An occasional lake effect blizzard here and it becomes national news. Then everybody believes that we are buried in snow all winter.
I have a snowblower, I used it maybe 3 times all this past winter.
There are other areas of the state that get more snow than we do.
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Old July 22, 2017   #37
carolyn137
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Of course Carolyn is right, Fusarium is extremely rare in NYS. The only real Fusarium infections I've read about were in some soybean fields in a few counties in central New York. So you have to wonder how Fusarium got there in the first place since it's an organism that's not native to the North and can't survives really cold winters.
It's far more likely to get Verticillium Wilt in the North than Fusarium.

And this RKN thing. Root Knot Nematodes are root feeding nematodes but there are many many species of root feeding nematodes that are not RKN's. RKN's are species in the genus Meloidogyne, They are not adapted to Northern climates with long frigid winters. They thrive in very hot climates down South. If they were to show up in the North at all they would have to have been imported from the South in contaminated soil.
Very true that there are both southern and northern RKN's, different species, but several years I contacted many Cooperative Extensions and asked them to list the 10 most diseases they saw and specifically asked if any of them had Id ed any northern RKN's the answer,at least back then was that there had been only TWO confirmed Dx of Northern ones.And not just by that one place,it was in toto.

So I concluded that in general northern RKN infections were not commonly found in the cooler zones.

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Old July 27, 2017   #38
Scooty
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Even 1" of snow and your towns and cities are crippled. Sissies
An occasional lake effect blizzard here and it becomes national news. Then everybody believes that we are buried in snow all winter.
I have a snowblower, I used it maybe 3 times all this past winter.
There are other areas of the state that get more snow than we do.
Naw it's not that bad. Texas throws sand on the highways for traction. No salt to gunk up or rust up your car. Plus I still love the BBQ. Coopers, Iron Works, Salt Lick, mmmmm
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Old August 2, 2017   #39
Hntrss
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I was hoping to get lucky, but my Rebel Yell and one Stump of the World are going down. Luckily they both set some good fruit before the FW got to them. Now I see the first telltale sign, before they yellow they stop growing. Still have Jazz, Orange Jazz, Elgin pink, Sudduths and Orange Russian 117 holding strong. I am going to need help picking rootstock for my next chapter !
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