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Old July 9, 2017   #106
AlittleSalt
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So did you get any production at all from your okra?
What few there were was tasteless.
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Old July 9, 2017   #107
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It is time to think outside of all the University of who cares crap I've read. I'm going to grow plants in this soil.
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The trouble is the soil doesnt care how determined you are.
I agree Marsha. That's why I want to go with unconventional ideas - think outside of the box. If my thoughts work - I can share them with others to give them hope. If they do not work, I can say that I tried.
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Old July 11, 2017   #108
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Have you tried Sweet Million Cherries?

Resistant to RKN, Fusarium Wilt, Mosaic Virus and Leaf Spot!.

http://parkseed.com/sweet-million-hy...p/05347-PK-P1/
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Old July 15, 2017   #109
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Sweet Million were the first to go. I had two plants.
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Old July 15, 2017   #110
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That really stinks!
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Old July 15, 2017   #111
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Yes, I agree.

I was wrong, the first plant to go was a Sungold, but that plant never did look quite right. Then the two Sweet Millions plants. Sweet Million is somewhat resistant to Fusarium race 1. We have Fusarium race 3 in our soil.
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Old July 18, 2017   #112
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I found that heavy mulching of okra delayed RKN for a while and keeping it constantly watered also helped. I grew mostly Cowhorn okra and usually did quite well with it. In spots where the RKN was really bad the plants would stunt and grow slowly and some wouldn't even make it to the production stage before starting to die.

I have pulled out about a dozen of my grafted tomato plants from my first planted tomato bed and checked all of them for RKN when removing them and have not found one yet showing any RKN. One end of the bed they were planted in was always one of the worst spots for RKN. I did see severe RKN on some of my cucumbers that were removed but they were less severe in the bed where I used a lot of peat and mulched them heavily.

Salt I feel your pain with the combo of RKN and fusarium since I too suffer from the same problems. I did find that over time adding lots of organic matter to the soil and using raised beds did lessen the extent of RKN damage and the severity; but every time I neglected to keep up the organic content the RKN problem would worsen. In just a two year period not adding organic matter would result in beds with soil far too sandy and much worse RKN problems.

Bill
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Old July 30, 2017   #113
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Salt, have you tried Tycoon?

https://today.agrilife.org/2014/03/1...xas-superstar/
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Old July 30, 2017   #114
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I did look at Tycoon. Of the several sites I found, it is VFFN with some resistance to spotted wilt and yellow leaf curl. The cheapest seeds I found were $21.50 for 250 seeds. That site and others are sold out.
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Old July 30, 2017   #115
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I did look at Tycoon. Of the several sites I found, it is VFFN with some resistance to spotted wilt and yellow leaf curl. The cheapest seeds I found were $21.50 for 250 seeds. That site and others are sold out.
Wow, that is crazy. A local Master Gardener was telling me about these. He said they were at the nurseries in big town. I had not known they were not available.

Have you seen this website? Look at the cherry tomatoes they call Texas Superstars.

http://texassuperstar.com/plants/index.html
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Old August 18, 2017   #116
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RKN have gotten into the soybeans down in south Arkansas and creating quite a havoc. My younger brother, who owns a drone flying business, was asked to do a survey. Farmers say the 'todes are been carried field-2-field by tractor equipment, truck, tires and all means possible.

Chemicals are being dumped in hopes by only retard and by late season the 'todes are up to full strength again. The areas affected have a sand/silt dirt base in the delta - which has been prime aggie land for 200 years.

Of course my brother never heard of a nematode before and did not quite understand the implication.

There is also a big issue regarding a chemical called "Dicamba," which has been the news nightly for the past two weeks. It was outlawed, but has was snuck in through the back door somehow and land owners are pretty miffed.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #117
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I have been following this thread with much interest, since I live in S.Florida and have been dealing with a severe infestation of RKN for many years. It got so bad a few years ago that I almost gave up gardening! I know how frustrating this problem is.

While researching biological controls, because I refuse to put poison on food that I eat and share with others, I stumbled onto some articles by Carey Reams. I read everything I could find on his methods of growing and have been implementing what I learned for about 5 or 6 years now. In a nutshell, his methods are about balancing soil minerals and getting soil energy at proper levels for vigorous healthy growth. There is so much more, but I hate to type, and probably won't do it justice with ten paragraphs more info.

I still have RKN, but have been able to get great production out of tomatoe crops before they succumb to disease. I am happy enough with the results that I am still growing tomatoes yearly and not looking to change anything else, for the time being. Unfortunately, I have not found any heirlooms that perform well in my garden,(have tried hundreds of varieties over the years).

My soil is sand, RKN HEAVEN! I added a lot of compost, then the required minerals,(mostly soft rock phosphate and high calcium lime), soil tested, then continue to adjust with mostly chicken manure and more lime. And mulch heavily. After 5 or 6 years of this, I have a dark black loamy soil about a foot to 18 inches deep. It really produces well, almost anything I plant does great. Just pulled sweet potatoes last month, and there was several with RKN damage, but plenty without damage. Just in time for Thanksgiving dinner.

I wrote all of this to hopefully encourage others not to give up! I don't think what I have done is the be all end all fix, but it has allowed me to continue gardening,(in the ground), and also enjoy better production than I ever previously experienced! The only pest issues I have are RKN and caterpillars. BT solves the caterpillars easily.

As a side note, I drive a semi-truck over the road, and am gone from home 3 wks. To a month at a time. Go home for a week, then back out on the road. Irrigation is on auto and no one else maintains my garden other than picking fruit. If I can do this, then I believe almost anyone can. I'm writing this while sitting in a truck stop in Big Springs Nebraska.

I have pictures on my tablet of last year's tomatoes and will try to post some if I can figure it out again! Best wishes to all the forum members and guests, and don't ever give up!

Brian

Last edited by Bio-Ag-Guy; 2 Weeks Ago at 06:54 PM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #118
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Here are the pics from last year's crop
Odoriko tomatoes and some broccoli. Those tomatoes grew to about 7 foot and produced about 40 per plant before dying.
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File Type: jpg 20170104_080151.jpg (860.7 KB, 42 views)
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #119
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Nice looking crop Bio. I just think amending the soil is too much work for the amount of time my plants will stay alive in it. My containers are just easier because I can put a barrier between my pot contents and the nematodes, and with the barrier I can get a 9 month season instead if a 3-4 month one that I would get with them in the ground. Plus the pots have a water reservoir. I don't want nematodes so I physically block them. For me easy peasy.
I am not sure what the attraction of growing in sand is. Soil I have to MAKE good with years of amendments? That's just not for me.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #120
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This is my just planted out Earthboxes, and a few 7 gallon pots with barriers underneath. From 10 days ago.
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