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Old August 24, 2016   #16
AlittleSalt
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Yes, I have researched using radishes as a cover crop. I can see a lot of benefits in growing them in many gardens. However, our soil is loose and friable. You simply cannot make it clump. You sink as you walk through the garden - its spongy. Also radishes attract harlequin bugs here and make it smell almost toxic.
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Old August 24, 2016   #17
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Now I use only grafted plants with rootstock that is very resistant to RKN.

Bill
Putting energy here sounds like a logical solution, as well as implementation of other.

Also, a dumb question, can these things travel through a fabric pouch?
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Old August 24, 2016   #18
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Bill, I don't know if they could or not? They are microscopic. I do know that they can be splashed up into growing containers.
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Old August 27, 2016   #19
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Today after physically pushing myself way beyond what I can do in a week. I stopped to smell the roses - look at that plants still growing. RKN has taken over all but 3 tomato plants. I keep pushing this nerve disease and it's trying to kick my AZZ. I'm not going to let it - nor am I going to let RKN do it to my gardens either.

I wonder if RKN can live through a mixture of 1 gallon bleach to 4 gallons water? If so, can RKN live through a half gallon Muriatic acid to four gallons water?

I am so tired of watching promising plants dying to a microscopic organism. I know the easiest and probably most acceptable answer is to give up. That's just not who I am. I am going to grow tomatoes in-ground.
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Old August 27, 2016   #20
b54red
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Today after physically pushing myself way beyond what I can do in a week. I stopped to smell the roses - look at that plants still growing. RKN has taken over all but 3 tomato plants. I keep pushing this nerve disease and it's trying to kick my AZZ. I'm not going to let it - nor am I going to let RKN do it to my gardens either.

I wonder if RKN can live through a mixture of 1 gallon bleach to 4 gallons water? If so, can RKN live through a half gallon Muriatic acid to four gallons water?

I am so tired of watching promising plants dying to a microscopic organism. I know the easiest and probably most acceptable answer is to give up. That's just not who I am. I am going to grow tomatoes in-ground.
I know your frustrations well; but don't give in a treat everything with bleach or acid. You will kill off all your good bacteria and the nematodes can move back in within a year even if the treatment works great. The reason I went to grafting was because fighting nematodes and fusarium wilt had become too much for me due to health problems and grafting was the least taxing way to fight back. I had no idea it would work as well as it has making my later gardening years so much easier both physically and mentally. It does take a bit of a learning curve but if you follow my detailed instructions you can eliminate most of the problems that arise in grafting. I do not have 100% success with each grafting experience but I have gotten my success rate up high enough that cost is not prohibitive nor is the work involved. The biggest problem is getting everything started early enough to have plants ready in time for the earliest planting dates here. Grafting can add up to a month to the process of getting plants started but usually only two to three weeks depending upon how well I do with the grafting. I take longer than most descriptions of grafting but get a much higher success rate due to the added steps and the longer hardening off process. This means starting in early November getting some of the things you will need ordered so you can start your seed in December and be ready to start grafting in January and early February. The slow growth of seedlings when it is too cold and the light is not good enough can delay getting them to the size needed to start grafting. Even if you are delayed and don't get your plants started and grafted early enough for the first planting date you will greatly benefit from the healthier plants that can take the heat so much better with healthy roots.

If you have any questions let me know and I'll be happy to answer them.

Bill
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Old August 27, 2016   #21
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A 1 to 4 ratio of muriatic acid to water is still powerful stuff.
Talk about scorched earth it would make the ground foam like crazy.

Worth
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Old August 27, 2016   #22
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Thank you Bill. I will be asking you questions along the way. The extra time grafting is a welcome thing for me.

This morning, it hurt to make coffee, and now that it is ready...here coffee - it's not paying attention. I guess I have to get up and pour it myself.
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Old August 27, 2016   #23
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A 1 to 4 ratio of muriatic acid to water is still powerful stuff.
Talk about scorched earth it would make the ground foam like crazy.

Worth
Yes it does Worth. It actually bubbles on the ground green, red, purple, yellow. At that ratio, it removes hardened mortar from brick and stone. It will let you know all about any cuts or scratches you have.
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Old August 27, 2016   #24
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Yes it does Worth. It actually bubbles on the ground green, red, purple, yellow. At that ratio, it removes hardened mortar from brick and stone. It will let you know all about any cuts or scratches you have.
I know what you used it for and the reason I didn't go into the safety of it.
No good mason would be without their trusty gallon of acid.
I keep it on hand all the time.
Worth
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Old August 27, 2016   #25
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. . . This morning, it hurt to make coffee, and now that it is ready...here coffee - it's not paying attention. I guess I have to get up and pour it myself.
ROFL (and empathy . . . annoying how stubborn these allegedly inanimate things can be when movement would be helpful, and how actively they can leap about when you are trying to do something that really requires six hands and you need them to stay still)

Regarding the vile RKNs, grafting to RKN resistant rootstock sound great but two other things . . . have you considered introducing some beneficial nematodes and letting them combat their destructive kinsfolk? and regarding the "they're in the local soil because these beds were filled only with native soil" . . . that may be true, but might the same tools have been used at some time to work the main in ground garden and the beds . . . so there might have been little hitchhikers that had been originally introduced into the main garden bed by outside plants?
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Old August 27, 2016   #26
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(I'm writing this while drinking vodka tonight - otherwise the nerve pain is too much to type.) The pain is still there - I just don't feel it as much. Hopefully I don't leave details out as I reply.

JLJ,

I have given a lot of thought and research to trying the beneficial nematodes. There are many benefits to the good nematodes - they actually hunt for grub worms and cutworms as well as RKN. I haven't researched as much as needed to find out if the Elbon Cereal Rye 'ECR" will kill the good nematodes too. I plan on planting 5 pounds of ECR this fall. It works as a trap crop according to several sites - the RKN makes its way into the root and dies. ECR is also thought of as a biofumagant when turned under. https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...bon+Cereal+Rye

Mustard greens are a lot alike https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...migant+mustard just not as winter hardy.

I agree with you and Bill, grafting wouldn't be done if it wasn't needed, so it's time for me to learn. One thing I did not mention is that of the three tomato plants that seem unaffected by RKN - two are Big Beef VFFNTA - It looks like I need to buy some seeds - most likely from http://www.tomatogrowers.com/BIG-BEE...ductinfo/3310/ There are a few others I want to try from there. I cannot afford rootstock, so growing rootstock from seed is going to have to suffice. As I said to my wife, I'll be gardening year-round which is exactly what I need.

As far as using contaminated tools, yeah, I did. I have a favorite rake that I use for everything. I've never gotten a blister from it and it is lightweight - yet durable for years.

I wish I could have replied sooner.
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Old August 28, 2016   #27
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Sorry the pain is causing so much difficulty -- glad you have some 'medicine' that helps.

My thought about contamination via tools was just that it might bear on whether your soil is natively contaminated or whether an imported RKN problem had been spread, which might impact what past and future steps might be necessary and/or work best to deal with them. You do seem to have several good ideas in mind -- hope they get rid of the nematodes -- at least the wicked ones -- permanently.

It's interesting to read about your progress. I haven't had RKN -- or at least haven't seen evidence of them -- but with gardens if it isn't one thing it's six others . . . so they may turn up any season, I suppose.
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Old September 2, 2016   #28
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I went out this morning to look at the solarized garden. It's time to take the plastic up. It has been rained on so many times. I don't know if the solarization process did any good or not? It rained an inch and 4/10 yesterday. The 10 day forecast is for highs in the upper 80s and lower 90s with several chances of rain. The plastic is starting to deteriorate. I want to get it up in as big of pieces as I can. I took a couple pictures.
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Old September 2, 2016   #29
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It doesn't take long to break down for sure in direct sunlight.
Worth
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Old September 2, 2016   #30
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I find that gin which was first introduced as a medicine to be far superior for my arthritis; but the relief is temporary but much appreciated at the time.

Bill
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