Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion regarding garden diseases, insects and other unwelcome critters.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old November 19, 2016   #46
Nematode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 1,523
Default

Thankfully dont have to deal with RKN here, but stumbled across this and thought it might help.

http://blog.gardenharvestsupply.com/...ll-cover-crop/


Rootknot Nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita), the parasitic culprit responsible for many vegetable deaths, especially the susceptible tomato, have proven to be sensitive to radish residues. Rootknot nematodes' numbers were found to be drastically reduced or completely obliterated. Researchers in eastern Texas planted radishes 58 days prior to planting sweet potatoes, with exceptional results. On the other hand, the beneficial nematodes, those which help to control disease and cycle nutrients to the plants (the ones we hardly hear anything about), were benefitted by the nitrogen-rich radish decomposition.

To learn even more, you can read GroundHog Radish – A Smart Choice Cover Crop. All in all, the combined positive effects should result in a higher crop yield with less work for you. Cash crop farmers have long known the benefits of cover cropping with radish; we think it's time you realize the same benefits.
Nematode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 27, 2016   #47
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,613
Default

Nematode, I have been thinking about those radishes. I'm sure I can buy the seeds for cheap in bulk locally at the local feed stores.

Yesterday, I watered the gardens. The Elbon cereal rye is coming up. I hope it kills RKN like all the sites I have looked up says. I can't help but wonder if it will do the opposite though. I don't mean to sound pessimistic - just, it's all new-to-me. I am more of an optimistic realist, so seeing the Nobel cereal rye growing is a good sign to me.

This year has slipped by so quickly. Soon I'll be starting tomato and pepper seeds. My tentative list is still just a second thought.

I can say that after solarization, the weeds did not come back, and I want to believe that is a good sign.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 26, 2017   #48
roper2008
Tomatovillian™
 
roper2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Bch, VA (7b)
Posts: 1,028
Default

When I pulled my Blush tomato plant last fall, this is what the roots looked like. The
plant produced a lot of tomatoes though. This must be RKN, right?



I think I'm going to put in a lot of compost, marigolds and mustard greens. I was thinking of planting my Sieva Lima Beans on the edges of the bed. I've read some-
where that they are nematode resistant.
roper2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 26, 2017   #49
ginger2778
Florida TAG™ Coordinator
 
ginger2778's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Plantation, Florida zone 10
Posts: 7,386
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by roper2008 View Post
When I pulled my Blush tomato plant last fall, this is what the roots looked like. The
plant produced a lot of tomatoes though. This must be RKN, right?



I think I'm going to put in a lot of compost, marigolds and mustard greens. I was thinking of planting my Sieva Lima Beans on the edges of the bed. I've read some-
where that they are nematode resistant.
That is a definite RKN infestation. Maybe solarize, that will kill them for a while. I grow in clean pots with fresh or solarized soil, and I use a plastic liner such as the bag the potting mix or fertilizer came in as a barrier between the pot and the soil so the pot can still drain, not inside the pot, so the nematodes can't get into the pot through the drain holes. In my Earthboxes, it's a non issue because they are solid and closed off from the ground.
All the potting mixes are solarized with 6mil clear plastic every year for at least 4 weeks, then replenished with new dolomite and new fertilizer, and topped off with new potting mix because it settles, but the potting mix is reused.
__________________
Marsha

“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.”
― Neil deGrasse Tyson
ginger2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 26, 2017   #50
roper2008
Tomatovillian™
 
roper2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Bch, VA (7b)
Posts: 1,028
Default

I do grow all my peppers in pots, but the large tomato plants are to hard for me
to control in a large pot or earthbox. I prefer to keep them in the ground. I will
not plant any tomatoes in this raised bed this summer. They will go in my other
raised beds.
You grow all your tomatoes in pots Marsha? That's a lot of pots because you grow
a lot of tomatoes.
roper2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 26, 2017   #51
ginger2778
Florida TAG™ Coordinator
 
ginger2778's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Plantation, Florida zone 10
Posts: 7,386
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by roper2008 View Post
I do grow all my peppers in pots, but the large tomato plants are to hard for me
to control in a large pot or earthbox. I prefer to keep them in the ground. I will
not plant any tomatoes in this raised bed this summer. They will go in my other
raised beds.
You grow all your tomatoes in pots Marsha? That's a lot of pots because you grow
a lot of tomatoes.
Yes! 47 Earthboxes, and several 7 Gallon pots. 2 tomato plants per EB.
__________________
Marsha

“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.”
― Neil deGrasse Tyson
ginger2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 26, 2017   #52
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,613
Default

Roper, I agree with Marsha. Some plants will continue to produce, but not any certain ones. It depends on if the plant can get enough nutrients or not. In my experience, one plant may not grow at all, and one 3' away grows and produces fairly well. Last year, my Big Beef plants didn't produce edible tomatoes before the RKN killed them. Big Beef is VFFNTA resistant.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert

Last edited by AlittleSalt; January 26, 2017 at 11:43 AM.
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 26, 2017   #53
maxjohnson
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: FL10B
Posts: 329
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
Yes! 47 Earthboxes, and several 7 Gallon pots. 2 tomato plants per EB.
That's a lot of Earthboxes.
maxjohnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 26, 2017   #54
roper2008
Tomatovillian™
 
roper2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Bch, VA (7b)
Posts: 1,028
Default

Maybe I will solorize, but I did read that about 12 inches deep get solarized. The nematodes go down where it's cooler, then come back up.
roper2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 27, 2017   #55
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 6,142
Default

If you can get hold of some fresh horse manure it will help if tilled directly in. I put it in one September in some badly infested beds and by the next spring the problem was greatly reduced. Of course my weed problems were greatly increased.

Adding any organic matter will help because RKN thrive in sandy soil. I still have them in a couple of my beds bad enough that they sometimes affect my grafted plants that are on root stock that is RKN resistant. Mulching so the soil doesn't dry out helps a bit also. Rotating with onions, garlic or hot peppers also helps some.

Bill
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 1, 2017   #56
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,613
Default

It's two weeks until it's time to till in the Elbon cereal rye. The pictures show exactly where the RKN was worse. The rye is nowhere near as thick and tall as it is in other parts of the garden.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HNI_0026.JPG (104.7 KB, 91 views)
File Type: jpg HNI_0027.JPG (101.8 KB, 90 views)
File Type: jpg HNI_0028.JPG (113.7 KB, 90 views)
File Type: jpg HNI_0030.JPG (97.8 KB, 90 views)
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 3, 2017   #57
decherdt
Tomatovillian™
 
decherdt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 239
Default

Its pretty sparse and short, figures to be less effective, but maybe with the warm winter it did some good.
__________________
500 sq ft of raised rows zone 8a
decherdt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6, 2017   #58
4season
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: albuquerque
Posts: 260
Default carrots with RKN

Dug a few carrots and was going to rinse them at the hydrant 200 feet away. dug a few more and the next to last had RKN galore. rinsed them all right by the infested spot. That bed will get marigolds this year. Threw that one away.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg rkn2017.JPG (135.3 KB, 65 views)

Last edited by 4season; February 6, 2017 at 02:30 PM. Reason: add last sentance
4season is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #59
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,613
Default

4season, that's got to be the ugliest carrot I have ever seen.

I finished potting up the rest of our tomato and pepper plants today. The seed cell trays get an overnight of no potting mix in them. Tomorrow, I'm going to plant 7 packs of French Dwarf Double Mixed Colors marigolds in those seed trays. That's part of the next step in fighting the RKN.

I'm going to plant a lot of mustard greens as well (Way too many to eat and freeze.) I need to research if there is a certain variety of mustards that do better against RKN - or if whatever I find will work.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2017   #60
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,613
Default

Cereal Rye till under day is today and it's a perfect day for it. High temperature of 65F, sunny, and it rained 2 inches three days ago. It tilled like a hot knife through butter.

This is our main garden 45'x45'. We tilled what oak leaves blew in there along with the mulched cereal rye.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HNI_0052.JPG (114.8 KB, 31 views)
File Type: jpg HNI_0053.JPG (102.8 KB, 31 views)
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:41 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★