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Old July 29, 2017   #1
Shrinkrap
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Default Overnight wilting in a container grown tomatoe

I know this is a common topic and I did search first here and elswhere, but I thought I'd ask you guys anyway.

The wilted plant is a Loxton Lad, and it shares an Earthbox with another Dwarf. They are in Pro Mix, have drip irrigation into the reservoir twice a day, and most have an organic fertilizer strip, and are supplemented with Maxibloom once a week or so. There are minor variations in feeding and spraying (Neem Oil, insect soap, Monterey insect spray with Spinosad).

I have about eight tomato plants, mostly dwarves, and this is the only one fruiting heavily. Fruiting heavily rings a bell for me, as does vaious ways to check for the wilts. I have a branch in some water too see if stuff comes out, but the cut end looks pretty good. The leaves are a nice green. No spots, no yellowing. The soil is not dry, and not wet, and the plant in the same pot seems fine.


I guess my biggest question is what the risks are of leaving it for a bit, to see what happens? As I said, it is almost August, and it is the only plant with a bunch of mater's.
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Last edited by Shrinkrap; July 29, 2017 at 02:10 PM.
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Old July 29, 2017   #2
gorbelly
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You've probably done this already, but have you

1) checked the entire stem down to the soil to check for damage

and

2) stuck your fingers down into the medium in several places near the wilted plant to double check that wicking is working correctly and that the medium is neither too wet nor too dry?
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Old July 29, 2017   #3
Shrinkrap
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gorbelly View Post
You've probably done this already, but have you

1) checked the entire stem down to the soil to check for damage

and

2) stuck your fingers down into the medium in several places near the wilted plant to double check that wicking is working correctly and that the medium is neither too wet nor too dry?
Thanks for answering.

Yes, and yes, but doing it again. . Sigh.

What are some problems that start with heavy fruiting?

Last edited by Shrinkrap; July 29, 2017 at 03:35 PM.
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Old July 29, 2017   #4
gorbelly
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Lots of wilts start then. If you were growing in soil, a sudden wilting like that without lots of chlorosis or foliage lesions would indicate bacterial wilt to me. But if you're using fresh soilless mix in your containers, that would be strange. Some wilts can be seedborne or in bought plants, though, I guess.
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Old July 29, 2017   #5
Shrinkrap
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The part I cut off and stuck in water perked up a bit, so I'm thinking it's a root thing. Maybe I fed THIS plant a liquid fert that it wasn't ready for.
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Old July 29, 2017   #6
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Yeah, too much fert, root rot... those are the things I'd suspect in an Earthbox. Bacterial canker can cause wilting, but it's usually slower onset, not sudden and dramatic wilting.

If the plant dies and doesn't recover, I'd dig it out and examine the roots.
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Old July 29, 2017   #7
Shrinkrap
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Will do!
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Old July 30, 2017   #8
stevenkh1
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Plant looks healthy but the tomato (blossom ends) look like there's a little scarring/zippering wanting to start... It sorta looks like a watering and/or cool nights issue. Just my 2 cents.
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