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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #1
greenthumbomaha
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Default Is this poison ivy?

Is there dangerous stuff growing under the trees in the windbreak?
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #2
AlittleSalt
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First picture looks a lot like poison ivy or oak.

Second picture looks like poison sumac https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...msKKiwjwSG7ocQ

I have no idea about the third picture.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #3
greenthumbomaha
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Yipes! Someone form the power company was working in the area but he didn't see anything in his workspace. He thought there was poison ivy in the pic you saw because of the 3 leaves. Actually pic 3 is more of the same. These are about 20 feet from a garden area with peppers and about 50 feet from tomatoes. Now to look up sprays.

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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #4
VC Scott
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Leaves of three, let them be.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #5
AlittleSalt
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Here, we have a plant that looks a lot like poison ivy/oak at a glance. It's woodland vine which has 5 leaves and isn't poisonous.

Poison sumac will change colors in autumn. It actually looks nice with reddish colored leaves. I have read that sumac can remain poisonous for years after it is cut down. We have it on our place where nobody goes - it's along our 1,200' driveway on one side. It does look nice in the fall.
It's one of those plants that if you leave it alone - it won't bite you But if it was growing in an area that we walk in - I would get rid of it.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #6
greenthumbomaha
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It's close enough to the parking area that letting it be will eventually clip someone if they sway, say someone on a cell phone not paying attention (not me, of course).

My growing partner has a vine growing up a tree that looks like a cucumber but never produces, and it is not an annual. Its right at the gate entrance, and I always wonder why he doesn't reach up and get it off the tree. We are seldom there at the same time, but I will have to point it out to him.

Ways to get rid of these? Still a month with active growth.

- Lisa
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #7
dmforcier
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I'm quite sensitive to PI - GA is rife with it - so I learned to ID it with my subconscious. The first pic looks like PI for sure.

There's a couple of PI-specific sprays at the big box that work well. Just do it on a still day. Or learn to recognize and avoid the beast.


Now as for the vine, my neighbor in GA had a big pine tree. You could see the PI in the tree, but there was no sign of it at the ground. The vine had grown up under the bark and had to be cut out with an axe. This seems to be the target habit for all those ground-hugging plants.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8
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I had to work at a site that had lots of poison ivy. A pump up sprayer filled with 1/2 water and 1/2 bleach worked wonders at killing it. Hot day, bright sun, and it will wilt in an hour or so. Come back a month later and spray any regrowth and it will usually give up. A little soap in the mix makes it stick better.

Last edited by 4season; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:56 PM. Reason: missing word
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #9
greenthumbomaha
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Thank you, 4season! It is partially shaded but worth a try.

- Lisa
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #10
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VC Scott View Post
Leaves of three, let them be.
We have a vine here with three leaves that is not poison ivy and I am constantly arguing with people about it.
Drives me nuts.
It is called Cissus trifoliata.

It even has its own horn worm that will not eat anything else.

The five leaf vine Salt spoke of is Virginia creeper.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #11
Hntrss
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Virginia creeper on the left, Poison Ivy on the right.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #12
brownrexx
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Pic #1 is Poison ivy but pic #3 is not the same. The leaves are more round and serrated at the edges.

If PI is growing up a tree, you can cut the stem at the base of the tree and the vine will die.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #13
seaeagle
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And the biggest myth concerning Poison Ivy is that it can be spread by scratching. Actually this is what happens. When you come in contact with Poison Ivy it doesn't show up all at once. It can show up over a period of days or weeks giving the illusion of spreading.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #14
oakley
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Good pic Hntrss. Exactly what I did when I moved here. I had thick vines climbing some
trees. Easily cut from the base of the trees.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #15
dmforcier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seaeagle View Post
And the biggest myth concerning Poison Ivy is that it can be spread by scratching. Actually this is what happens. When you come in contact with Poison Ivy it doesn't show up all at once. It can show up over a period of days or weeks giving the illusion of spreading.
You might want to rethink that conclusion. Before I killed all the stuff in the area, I would get PI from cats who would go out in the woods, then come back and rub on me. Meanwhile I hadn't been near the stuff for weeks.

The oil can be spread. But you're right that it doesn't necessarily show up immediately.
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