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Old March 13, 2018   #1
mensplace
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Default SO MANY VARIETIES, like a whole new universe of flavors

I have never grown peppers other that the same old bitter skinned bells from Bonnies or the far too hot cayenne, tabascos, etc..

Over the past week this ne endeavor has been like being exposed to a whole new world of pursuit in looking at the beautiful shapes...long ones, thick ones, large one, and super sweets and names that intrigue and promise news tastes and cooking abilities that I have never been exposed to from around the world.

With names like Elephant Ear, Calabrian, Sweet Corno de Toro, Rams Horn and others I can't even spell, never mind the gorgeous pictures of folks holding broad peppers, long ones, thick fleshed ones and promising sweetness and wonderful application in frying, sautéing, pickling , stuffing or just use in salads and fresh eating I am elated after years of just tomatoes.

Sorry, I know that's heresy, but I have flavors I want to experience in so little time. NOT the super hot and certainly not the scorchers, but those to make me proud and to be used daily.

SO, I turn to YOU..the good people here who know peppers. The catalogs are full of promises, but do you have any yourself hat you think I should add just as a couple of plants. What stands out in your experience and collection? Any three or four seeds to try new varieties would be appreciated. Will work with you per your preferences.
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Old March 15, 2018   #2
Goodloe
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Wow, I get to go 1st?! Good Lord, where to start? I get 5 or 6 seed catalogs, and I want to grow almost every pepper I see! But...I try to limit myself to about 15-20 varieties per year. I eat a lot of peppers, but the bulk of my production goes into what we call, downheah, "pepper sauce". I think most of y'all might call it "pepper vinegar", or just "pickled peppers". We eat the peppers themselves and pour the vinegar on turnip/collard/mustard greens, as well as peas and beans. I like HOT pepper sauce. My friends and family (read: "moochers who are too sorry to grow their own peppers") also like HOT pepper sauce.

Anyway, I grow so many varieties because I like to make very cool, colorful looking jars of pepper sauce. Hopefully, the picture will load....

My main core every year is plain ol' cayenne and jalapenos. Then I add in whatever looks cool to me. I only grow hot peppers. If it ain't hot, I got no use for it. The last couple of years, I've grown some "superhots", just 'cause.

This is the 2018 list:



Cayenne, Maule's Red Hot, Fireball
Mustard Habanero, Carolina Reaper
Golden Cayenne, Jalapeno
Fish Pepper, Purple Jalapeno
Rooster Spur, Fatalli, White Fatalli
Naga Peach, Fatalli/Scotch Bonnet Cross
Big Chile Hybrid, Red Habanero

See anything that interests you? I've probably got a few seeds from most listed that I would be happy to share. Peppers, like tomatoes, are almost unlimited in their diversity. Have Fun!
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Old March 19, 2018   #3
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The last few years I have been trying to find peppers that are on the mild/sweet side, but have more flavor than your store bought bell peppers, with a little heat in some cases.
Ones that I have tried that we have liked, and had good luck with growing, have been the ‘giant’ red Marconi type, one called Ajvarski (sweet, bull horn type), sweet Banana pepper, Alma Paprika and a C. Baccatum called Christmas Bell.
The last Christmas Bell that we had put out a ton of peppers, late season like most of these, but it kept pumping them out for a while which gave us enough to dry and freeze for later use. And everyone liked the taste. It may be a little different than other ones called Christmas Bells, as it’s a little rounder pepper with less of that “crown” shape.
The Red Marconi’s were really good in salads as well as cooking. I like the Ajvarski as far as overall flavor.
This year I have sprouted or purchased seedlings for some of the mild Habanero style. I am trying Grenada Seasoning, Frontera, Aji Dulce II, Habanada and Zavory.
Also trying Corno di Toro Giallo Pepper, Arroz Con Pollo and Sheepnose Pimento. And an F1 called ‘Mad Hatter’.

Let me know if I can help. Good Luck with your search!
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Old March 20, 2018   #4
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Most of the paprika peppers are long on flavor, low on heat. I grow Feher Ostrokon. Very flavorful and makes good powder. I've grown Alma and I'm growing it again this year. It's a great pepper.

As mentioned above, there are very flavorful peppers, such as Grenada, Perfume, and Aji Dulce, that pack flavor and no heat. They're great on everything. I gave my coworker Perfume powder and he puts in pies and other desserts.

Good luck! I'll have about 15 varieties this year. I mainly dry them and use for powder, but also make sauces. I freeze a lot as well.

I used to pickle a lot more, I should start that again...
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Old March 28, 2018   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensplace View Post
SO, I turn to YOU..the good people here who know peppers. The catalogs are full of promises, but do you have any yourself hat you think I should add just as a couple of plants. What stands out in your experience and collection? Any three or four seeds to try new varieties would be appreciated. Will work with you per your preferences.
If you like sweet peppers, grow Yummy peppers. (Renee's Garden sells seeds under the name "Yummy Belle".) Yummy peppers are the sweetest peppers I ever had. They are small, conical, and cute.

Orange is a common color, although they also come in red and yellow.
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Old March 28, 2018   #6
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Thanks for those sources. I'm sure many will benefit from your suggestion!

I have all of the pepper varieties that I need and the first planting is booming, while the second flat (started this week) offers great promise. My Middle Eastern/Mediterranean garden and salad garden is off to a good start.

I'm still curious about the FLAVOR in some of the hots beyond habanero (which I like in sprinkled pepper sauce) but not enough to cause any further esophageal damage.

Still a few more evenings in the thirties predicted for mid April so nothing will go into the ground for a while.
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Old March 28, 2018   #7
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I actually like the flavor of my superhots better than most medium-hot varieties. The key is to just use a small amount, like one pod to one pot of food. You get the flavor, without much heat.
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Old March 28, 2018   #8
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Our new friend from Ms. (GOODLOE) very kindly rushed me some of his favorite hots for our shared southern love of greens and such that I will process into different types of sauce and pickle in vinegar. Like you said, that only takes a small dash and is nowhere near those at top of the scale like the new Pepper X and a few others.

I can't help but wonder if some of those would classify as an "attractive nuisance" in legal terminology if a neighbor or child ate one.
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Old March 28, 2018   #9
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I can't help but wonder if some of those would classify as an "attractive nuisance" in legal terminology if a neighbor or child ate one.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attrac...sance_doctrine

I had to read the wiki article. It's been a while since I took torts. The doctrine can be applied to virtually anything, according to that article. The problem with the pepper scenario is that there are no permanent damages from eating a hot pepper, so there would be nothing to sue over.
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Old March 28, 2018   #10
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I am not a lawyer, but know there is a LOT that can happen in a courtroom when damages enter the picture.........

Young child sees really tasty looking and attractive little red fruit, picks it, chews it, starts screaming, crying in anguish, claws at mouth and eyes, neighbors come running and then parents, 911 called, ambulance arrives and rushes poor child to hospital ...by now he is vomiting and gasping to breath. Hospital treats child and news crew responds. At court who is the jury going to bill for expenses ?

That said, surely anyone here growing the superhots would put them where they are not readily seen, clearly labeled, and preferably fenced.
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Old March 30, 2018   #11
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how the times change mensplace... my younger brother grabbed a jalapeno off of my dad's plate when he was 2 and ate it before it could be taken away from him.... tough li'l guy... his face turned red for 20 minutes... no crying or screaming...lesson learned then.. though he likes hot pickled peppers now..
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Old March 30, 2018   #12
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"•The Carolina Reaper pepper is 175 to 880 times hotter than a Jalapeño"
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Old March 30, 2018   #13
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“Pepper X is three times hotter than any other peppers that are out there available commercially,” he claimed. “It’s twice as hot as the Reaper at 1.6 million, so this is a dangerous pepper.”

“We’re playing with fire,” said pepper breeder Ed Currie when announcing his new pepper on a recent episode of First We Feast’s “Hot Ones” web series.

“Pepper X is three times hotter than any other peppers that are out there available commercially,” he claimed. “It’s twice as hot as the Reaper at 1.6 million, so this is a dangerous pepper.”

Measuring in at an alleged 3.18 Scoville units, Pepper X would be hotter than Carolina Reaper by a margin of more than 1 million Scoville units.
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