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Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

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Old 1 Day Ago   #61
tryno12
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Bummer about that dust Worth, hope something changes in your favor. Thanks all for the help!
Pete
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Old 11 Hours Ago   #62
Hunt-Grow-Cook
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracydr View Post
How do you attach your plants to the bamboo stakes? Also,is there a trick to getting the bamboo stakes into the ground? I seem to not be able to pound them more then a few inches despite fairly soft soil.
Spring loaded plant clips or loosely tied panty hose. I use a post driver and carefully drive them trying not to split or crack the bamboo.
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Old 10 Hours Ago   #63
Dewayne mater
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Worth - Suze - one of the other founders here for those who haven't been around forever, taught me (via T-ville) that heirlooms can be grown here! She was masterful and not terribly far from where you are, though it is much more humid over her way. Through the years, I learned so much from Her, from Raybo, and Bill from Alabama and others. Don't get discouraged, get determined. Keep trying new ways, new start times, new everything and when something works, apply that forever and keep looking for more improvements. Sure, we have brutal tomato weather in Texas, but, it can be done! Results will vary year to year, but always success!
I had a year where my house foundation was under repair all summer. My gardens were all destroyed. I had no choice but to use Raybos earthtainers. They proved that year that they work like crazy are they are particularly suited to our two short growing seasons. I've kept them ever since and every year have tons of tomatoes from them.
My ground gardens frustrated me bc of disease, insects and lack of production in spite of tons of growth. I eventually tried Bill's lower and lean method. Now, when my earthtainers are playing out, I usually have about 3 more weeks of production out of the in ground plants which start later due to the soil taking a long time to warm up relatively. So now I typically have lots of tomatoes from May through mid July. Moral of the story is never give up and keep trying new things until you succeed!
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Old 10 Hours Ago   #64
Tormato
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When I get the time, I'll have to read this entire thread. In planting my neighbor's garden, I've basically painted myself into a corner. One plant with one stake spaced 2 feet apart in all directions.
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Old 10 Hours Ago   #65
jmsieglaff
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I'm experiment this year with my indeterminates.

I usually prune suckers early and let them start growing a couple feet up, limiting to 3-5 main stems. This year I've let early suckers grow, except the ones within 6" of ground and I will prune all suckers above once I get to the 3-5 main stems per plant. Thought is I'll get more fruit earlier, which can be helpful in years where foliage disease is more aggressive than average. We'll see how it goes. My suckers are all flowering now!

Dwarfs I just prune for airflow considerations (and no leaves contacting the ground).
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Old 9 Hours Ago   #66
arnorrian
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After late blight and fulvia of last year I'm going for strict pruning of all suckers and drop-and-lean. Also 12-leaves method.
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Old 9 Hours Ago   #67
jhouse
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Can someone point me to Bill's lower and lean method? I had to look up the term. Also what is 12 leaves method? Thanks for your patience with a novice pruner.

All I have done so far (planted in garden Memorial Day), is prune all lower leaves and spread a lot of straw for mulch, for less soil getting on the leaves. And sprayed Daconil (I know that one's controversial but I have always gotten early blight).

I'm trying to decide how to tie up stems, what material to use, and how to prune other than lower foliage. (I don't think I want to try 1 stem this year but definitely want more ventilation than no pruning). Not sure how varieties play into it, all 6 plants are indeterminate, 2 grape, 2 cherry, 1 large Mr Stripey type and one large red slicer(Brandywise).
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Old 9 Hours Ago   #68
arnorrian
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You can see the basics of the lower and lean method here:



12-leaves method is simply counting the leaf branches from the top of the plant and removing all of them pass the twelfth one.

Both methods are for indeterminate varieties.

Last edited by arnorrian; 8 Hours Ago at 02:04 PM.
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Old 9 Hours Ago   #69
jhouse
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Thanks Arnorrian!
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Old 2 Hours Ago   #70
AKmark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhouse View Post
Can someone point me to Bill's lower and lean method? I had to look up the term. Also what is 12 leaves method? Thanks for your patience with a novice pruner.

All I have done so far (planted in garden Memorial Day), is prune all lower leaves and spread a lot of straw for mulch, for less soil getting on the leaves. And sprayed Daconil (I know that one's controversial but I have always gotten early blight).

I'm trying to decide how to tie up stems, what material to use, and how to prune other than lower foliage. (I don't think I want to try 1 stem this year but definitely want more ventilation than no pruning). Not sure how varieties play into it, all 6 plants are indeterminate, 2 grape, 2 cherry, 1 large Mr Stripey type and one large red slicer(Brandywise).
I tried to paste you a good thread with lots of pics and it flopped. LOL
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Old 1 Hour Ago   #71
SteveP
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First of all, I am a lazy gardener and do as little as I deem possible in my garden. My normal pruning consists of pruning the lower branches off to prevent soil splashback and any diseased leaves, until it begins getting hot and humid. After that I just let'em go and get what I get.

This year has been a little different with milder temps later into the season and LOTS of rain.
Weatherguy said last night we have received 30" of rain the last 6 weeks. We got another 1.8" this morning. For the first time, I pruned my plants to open up better air flow on the interior of the plants. I figured with all of this rain, giving them some room to breathe and dry might be beneficial. Plus, it hasn't gotten HOT yet.
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