Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old October 26, 2012   #31
Rockporter
Tomatovillian™
 
Rockporter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Texas Coastal Bend
Posts: 3,088
Default

One thing I have noticed is that we have not discussed nutrients for the inert potting mixes used in self watering containers.

Dolomite lime must be added to the peat mixes because the peat is too highly acidic for all seeded vegetable plants, except strawberries and there is something else but I cannot think right off the top of my head what it is.

Using a maximum of 15-15-15 fertlizer for the plants. I use 10-10-10 because that is what is available here in my area. Others use 7-7-7 and many others between. The trick is getting a good PH balance and ferts too.
__________________
In the spring
at the end of the day
you should smell like dirt

~Margaret Atwood~



Last edited by Rockporter; October 26, 2012 at 11:41 PM.
Rockporter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 26, 2012   #32
Rockporter
Tomatovillian™
 
Rockporter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Texas Coastal Bend
Posts: 3,088
Default

Sorry Keger, it isn't so simple but it works, lol.
__________________
In the spring
at the end of the day
you should smell like dirt

~Margaret Atwood~


Rockporter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 26, 2012   #33
FreyaFL
Tomatovillian™
 
FreyaFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: SW FL
Posts: 152
Default

Wow, great info! I'll get some peat moss and rejuvenate that bag. Also REALLY glad to know why I've read "add dolomite" in so many places when making potting mix. Thank you!
FreyaFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 26, 2012   #34
coloken
Tomatovillian™ Honoree
 
coloken's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NE Co
Posts: 304
Default

Gosh, now I know what I have been doing wrong. My tomatoes only got way over my head- a good 8 foot high this year. Because I have never added Dolomite lime, or any lime to my potting mix. I will try to remember to find some for next year.
Added
I should add that here in Colorado no body uses lime in farming that is so usual in other parts of the county but this is sage brush county very alkaline.

Last edited by coloken; October 26, 2012 at 11:43 PM.
coloken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 26, 2012   #35
Rockporter
Tomatovillian™
 
Rockporter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Texas Coastal Bend
Posts: 3,088
Default

Freya,

Add about 2 cups dolomite to 2 cubic feet of mix for your containers. The best thing to do is add the mix to your container and know how much you will use in the container and then mix in the dolomite lime.

You must use "DOLOMITE LIME" not "HYDRATED LIME".

Dolomite will break down slowly and allow the plant to uptake the necessary nutrients from it.

Hydrated Lime will break down all at once and burn your roots.

I get Dolomite Lime at my local Tractor Supply Store and it is pelletized. I get a 40lb bag for around $4 or $5, I don't remember the exact price.
__________________
In the spring
at the end of the day
you should smell like dirt

~Margaret Atwood~


Rockporter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 26, 2012   #36
Rockporter
Tomatovillian™
 
Rockporter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Texas Coastal Bend
Posts: 3,088
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coloken View Post
Gosh, now I know what I have been doing wrong. My tomatoes only got way over my head- a good 8 foot high this year. Because I have never added Dolomite lime, or any lime to my potting mix. I will try to remember to find some for next year.
Added
I should add that here in Colorado no body uses lime in farming that is so usual in other parts of the county but this is sage brush county very alkaline.

We are talking container gardening, using inert mixes with no nutrients or soil to start with, right?
__________________
In the spring
at the end of the day
you should smell like dirt

~Margaret Atwood~



Last edited by Rockporter; October 27, 2012 at 12:09 AM.
Rockporter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 27, 2012   #37
FreyaFL
Tomatovillian™
 
FreyaFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: SW FL
Posts: 152
Default

Thanks, Rockporter!
FreyaFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 27, 2012   #38
mdvpc
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
mdvpc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 4,321
Default

In addition to my fert and lime, I add 1 tablespoon of azomite.
__________________
Michael
mdvpc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 27, 2012   #39
coloken
Tomatovillian™ Honoree
 
coloken's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NE Co
Posts: 304
Default

Rockporter, While i am joking about it, I am referring to my raised beds and all so to my containers in my GH which have only potting mix (forest products and peat) and perlite. Possible the potting mix has lime along with the fertilizer. Any way I am not dumb enough to overlook good advice and what you say. I will defiantly be looking for dolomite lime in the future. We are never to old to learn
coloken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 27, 2012   #40
coastal bend
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: south texas
Posts: 114
Default

Rockporter do you think the 10-10-10 is better down here than the 7-7-7. After the the first flush of tomatoes are picked it seems that the plants seem to struggle to keep going. I thought maybe the 7-7-7 fert had played out. Also is the Dolomite you buy down here is the same as from EB. A lot cheaper to buy down here. Thanks Coastalbend
coastal bend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 27, 2012   #41
Rockporter
Tomatovillian™
 
Rockporter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Texas Coastal Bend
Posts: 3,088
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coloken View Post
Rockporter, While i am joking about it, I am referring to my raised beds and all so to my containers in my GH which have only potting mix (forest products and peat) and perlite. Possible the potting mix has lime along with the fertilizer. Any way I am not dumb enough to overlook good advice and what you say. I will defiantly be looking for dolomite lime in the future. We are never to old to learn
Dolomite lime helps to stop the blossom end rot which occurs when the mix is too acidic.
__________________
In the spring
at the end of the day
you should smell like dirt

~Margaret Atwood~


Rockporter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 27, 2012   #42
Rockporter
Tomatovillian™
 
Rockporter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Texas Coastal Bend
Posts: 3,088
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coastal bend View Post
Rockporter do you think the 10-10-10 is better down here than the 7-7-7. After the the first flush of tomatoes are picked it seems that the plants seem to struggle to keep going. I thought maybe the 7-7-7 fert had played out. Also is the Dolomite you buy down here is the same as from EB. A lot cheaper to buy down here. Thanks Coastalbend

Hi coastal bend, yes I do think the 10-10-10 is better because it seems to last much longer than the EB ferts. I have 8 new EB's and I can tell the 7-7-7- is not as good as using the 10-10-10. I buy it at Lowe's in a green bag.

It is possible that the stress our plants are under in our weather is part of the cause. I think maybe the plants need to take up more nutrients to get through the hot and humid conditions they are under most of the time.

The dolomite lime I get from Tractor Supply is not the same as EB's. The EB one is a pulverized/powdered one and the Tractor Supply one is a pelletized lime. It is easier to work with in my opinion and doesn't blow around near as bad as the powdered stuff in our wind. It is definitely much cheaper than buying from EB.
__________________
In the spring
at the end of the day
you should smell like dirt

~Margaret Atwood~


Rockporter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 28, 2012   #43
greentiger87
Tomatovillian™
 
greentiger87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Houston, TX - 9a
Posts: 211
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockporter View Post
Dolomite lime helps to stop the blossom end rot which occurs when the mix is too acidic.
I disagree. If the mix is so acidic or deficient in calcium that blossom end rot is occurring, I think calcium deficiency will be obvious from miniaturized, distorted and chlorotic new growth.

Blossom end rot occurs because of some variation of moisture stress. The plant isn't moving water, with dissolved calcium, through the plant fast enough to provide calcium to the fruits (which don't transpire as much as leaves). The underlying causes of this can be numerous.

Carolyn has written about this quite a bit I think, though I don't have a link handy
greentiger87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 28, 2012   #44
Rockporter
Tomatovillian™
 
Rockporter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Texas Coastal Bend
Posts: 3,088
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greentiger87 View Post
I disagree. If the mix is so acidic or deficient in calcium that blossom end rot is occurring, I think calcium deficiency will be obvious from miniaturized, distorted and chlorotic new growth.

Blossom end rot occurs because of some variation of moisture stress. The plant isn't moving water, with dissolved calcium, through the plant fast enough to provide calcium to the fruits (which don't transpire as much as leaves). The underlying causes of this can be numerous.

Carolyn has written about this quite a bit I think, though I don't have a link handy
Wel, it is the way I understod it to be and what you are saying is pretty much the same thing, just in a more detailed way. Thanks for the information.
__________________
In the spring
at the end of the day
you should smell like dirt

~Margaret Atwood~


Rockporter is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:52 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★