Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 25, 2016   #31
jpop
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SE Florida Zone 10
Posts: 320
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PureHarvest View Post
Jpop, just remember, pH does not tell you the whole story.
It's like using a thermometer to diagnose why you don't feel well.

Patient: "Dr., I took my temperature reading. It was 100 degrees. What do I have?"
Dr: "I have no way of knowing without more info. Your temp reading is a symptom, not a cause."

So, a pH test can be helpful, because it will tell you if you are waaaaay out of whack to clue you in on a nutrient imbalance, but you will still be left wondering what that actually is.
You can't just assume that a pH below 6.5 will need limestone. Then I would ask you what type of limestone will you need, dolomitic (lots of Mg with the C), or calcitic (little Mg with the C)? Are you gonna use calcium nitrate?
Then their is your source water. Look at Worth's example earlier with high calcium water...
Thank you Pure. I see a lot about BER and most likely caused w/ PH imbalance not allowing sufficient calcium, even when present in high quantities, which is why I asked about a handheld reliable PH meter. Where do you send your soil for analysis?
jpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 26, 2016   #32
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,295
Default

Agrolab in Harrington Delaware.
I like soluble forms of cal. Like what you'd find in a greenhouse grade calcium nitrate that dissolves completely in water. No worries about availability. Ready to go into the roots/plant.

Last edited by PureHarvest; February 26, 2016 at 12:45 AM.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 26, 2016   #33
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,295
Default

But I havent sampled in 2 years as I use a sterile soilless mix in grow bags and add soluble nutrients at each watering.
The in ground growing I do is for other veggies and some fruit, and there I toss down one of the espoma tones and drip feed cal nitrate along the way very lightly. I am due to test. I don't till and do cover cropping spring and fall and cut that and layer it down, move it aside at planting, then push it back to cover. The worms find that mat of matter and go nuts. The soil is rich and mellow underneath and the soil is never bare year round.
I get good yields and am happy.
With the tomatoes I am all about precision including doing leaf samples.

Last edited by PureHarvest; February 26, 2016 at 12:53 AM.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 26, 2016   #34
jpop
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SE Florida Zone 10
Posts: 320
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PureHarvest View Post
But I havent sampled in 2 years as I use a sterile soilless mix in grow bags and add soluble nutrients at each watering.
The in ground growing I do is for other veggies and some fruit, and there I toss down one of the espoma tones and drip feed cal nitrate along the way very lightly. I am due to test. I don't till and do cover cropping spring and fall and cut that and layer it down, move it aside at planting, then push it back to cover. The worms find that mat of matter and go nuts. The soil is rich and mellow underneath and the soil is never bare year round.
I get good yields and am happy.
With the tomatoes I am all about precision including doing leaf samples.
What do you use for soluble nutrients and how much?
jpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27, 2016   #35
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,295
Default

Hydro-gardens Chemgro
4-18-38 use 8 ounces (dry weight)
Calcium nitrate 8 ounces
Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) 4 ounces
When using on mature plants, per the instructions, you would use these rates to make 100 gallons of solution.
I then pump this solution through a 1/2 poly line that has tubes tapped into it that go to spray stakes. They spray the solution onto the top of the soil in the bag long enough to get just a tad to trickle out the bottom of the bag. This gets repeated 6-8 times per day.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27, 2016   #36
jpop
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SE Florida Zone 10
Posts: 320
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PureHarvest View Post
Hydro-gardens Chemgro
4-18-38 use 8 ounces (dry weight)
Calcium nitrate 8 ounces
Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) 4 ounces
When using on mature plants, per the instructions, you would use these rates to make 100 gallons of solution.
I then pump this solution through a 1/2 poly line that has tubes tapped into it that go to spray stakes. They spray the solution onto the top of the soil in the bag long enough to get just a tad to trickle out the bottom of the bag. This gets repeated 6-8 times per day.
Thank you for sharing
jpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27, 2016   #37
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,295
Default

Sure thing
If you ever get a soil test result and want some help interpreting it, just hit me up.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27, 2016   #38
jpop
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SE Florida Zone 10
Posts: 320
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PureHarvest View Post
Sure thing
If you ever get a soil test result and want some help interpreting it, just hit me up.
Funny you should ask. Find my local lab extension site today. Will let you know, again I really appreciate it as this is all new to me.
jpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27, 2016   #39
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,295
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jpop View Post
Funny you should ask. Find my local lab extension site today. Will let you know, again I really appreciate it as this is all new to me.
Totally cool.
I love this stuff and am always learning. I don't know everything but find that I learn more when I help people seek than when I go it alone.
Drop me a line or post somewhere and we will figure it out.
I'm not a doctor but I'll take a look
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 28, 2016   #40
jpop
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SE Florida Zone 10
Posts: 320
Default

Sounds good. Will do
jpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 29, 2016   #41
Ricky Shaw
Tomatovillian™
 
Ricky Shaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Zone 6a Denver North Metro
Posts: 1,910
Default

Be aware on the Hydro-Gardens ChemGro, the ppm recommendations are based on the Truncheon .70 conversion and not the more typical Hanna .50 conversion. They do list the EC values in mhos, which is nice cause most products don't, then you don't even worry what the conversion factor is.
Ricky Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 29, 2016   #42
jpop
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SE Florida Zone 10
Posts: 320
Default

Does this mean it can be over applied
jpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 29, 2016   #43
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,295
Default

Assuming your source water is not loaded with elements, if you follow the rates i posted from their instructions, you would not be overdoing it.
The total dissolved solids in your water can change the total in your final solution.
Your pH adjusting material, if you need it, can do the same, so testing your final solution with a meter will tell you how far off the mark you are.
Travis' comment is key if, so you need to consider your brand of meter or what units you are using.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 29, 2016   #44
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,295
Default

For example, my source water, from a well, is very low in TDS at 50 ppm.
I have to add potassium hydroxide to raise the pH 1 point. This adds to the nutrient load before I add the three fertilizers. However, when I follow the instructions, my mhos for the total solution is right on.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 29, 2016   #45
roper2008
Tomatovillian™
 
roper2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Bch, VA (7b)
Posts: 1,159
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfollett View Post
I was going to start a thread with a question about Garden lime, but thanks, I'll piggyback here. I use it in peat mixes for containers. I understand it's purpose - to reduce the acidity of the mix - especially to help control BER.

Now my question : Do you need to add lime to a peat based mix that will be used for potting up and growing seedlings to the point they are ready to plant out or put into a larger pot? Do you need it when you are not going to grow to the fruit stage in the mix? Does the acidity harm the basic plant at that stage?

Actually, that was three questions, but thanks for the answers.
I use pro-mix for my seedlings. I don't use any lime until they go into their permanent
home in the spring, usually in containers.
roper2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:56 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★