Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 29, 2016   #46
brownrexx
Tomatovillian™
 
brownrexx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Southeastern PA
Posts: 831
Default

I never use lime. I start my seedlings in seed starting mix and I routinely have my garden soil tested. It has plenty of calcium and the pH tends to be on the high side at 7 - 7.2 so I definitely would not want to add lime and raise the pH.

I am never in favor of adding amendments unless you know that you need them based on soil tests or appearance of the plants themselves.

I always say that it's like salting your food before you taste it. How would you know that it needs salt?

If we are talking about hydroponics or container gardening, then you guys are way out of my league since I know nothing about that.
brownrexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 29, 2016   #47
TheUrbanFarmer
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Zone 8a
Posts: 64
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by roper2008 View Post
I use pro-mix for my seedlings. I don't use any lime until they go into their permanent
home in the spring, usually in containers.
That is because pro-mix has already been balanced for pH with lime. Check the label. Most pro-mix variants use a combination of dolomite and calcitic lime.
TheUrbanFarmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 15, 2016   #48
jpop
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SE Florida Zone 10
Posts: 320
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PureHarvest View Post
For example, my source water, from a well, is very low in TDS at 50 ppm.
I have to add potassium hydroxide to raise the pH 1 point. This adds to the nutrient load before I add the three fertilizers. However, when I follow the instructions, my mhos for the total solution is right on.
I see you use potassium hydroxide to raise PH. What would you use to lower it in your source water.
jpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16, 2016   #49
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,178
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jpop View Post
I see you use potassium hydroxide to raise PH. What would you use to lower it in your source water.
That is a good question. I've not been in that spot in 15 years. When I lived elswhere, we had high really high pH water and we're trying to maintain water gardens. We installed an injector and concentrate tank and our compound was powdered citric acid.
I don't remember the details on rates or if that's the best, but that's what we did.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16, 2016   #50
jpop
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SE Florida Zone 10
Posts: 320
Default

Thanks pure. Measured my source municipal yesterday and it was above 8. Crazy as my earthboxes have been averaging 3 to 3.5 gallons per day. Not sure if I should buy a pH meter for the soil in the containers but I don't want to keep up the trend with the high pH water due to the volume
jpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16, 2016   #51
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,178
Default

Your soil should have a buffering capacity to handle that. I can not say for sure how that will change over time though because there are a lot of variables.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:45 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★