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Old January 14, 2008   #16
bryanccfshr
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Smaller. Think about this... 1/32" x16 holes = 1/2" with low flow rates that will be about it. anything downstream of the 16 most advantagous holes will not be getting any flow unless you increase the flow rate, you will simply run out of water running it through 1/2" pipe with 1/32" holes. . Your limiting factor is not PSI, It is available flow rate at the irrigation zone. If your main header was say 1" or 1 1/2" your approach would have a better chance of success.
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Old January 14, 2008   #17
Worth1
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Tuk50 your going to have to put one hole at the last fartest end of the pipe and put a guage on the end of the pipe.
You had best get a gauge the reads ounces up to 2 pounds if they have such a thing.
Close the hole and check the pressure open the hole and check the pressure.

The amount that you lose will be your K factor including psi and friction loss per hole.

So let’s say you lost I ounce and you had 2 pounds you would then only have16 holes before you had your minimum pressure of 1 psi.

If you don’t have a drill press you will break a lot of 1/32 bits doing it by hand.
The smallest common drill bit size is 1/16 in most stores.

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Old January 14, 2008   #18
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Oh yes and what Bryan said too.

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Old January 15, 2008   #19
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It is the same principle that limits the line lengths in laser drilled tubing such as this.. http://www.dripirrigation.com/drip_i...roducts_id=274

I believe the layout and the principle for Tuk50's irrigation plan is great. he has a header a water source and his layout complete. I would just replace the final runs of pvc into the irrigation zone with 1/2" poly tubing or drip tape or drip tubing. If poly line is installed emitters can be places in exact locations where water is needed. Flag drippers are probably best for the low pressure application because most PC drippers require ~4 psi to open. THe flag drippers are recomended for low pressure systems. http://www.dripworksusa.com/store/drippers.php#tiptop
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Old January 15, 2008   #20
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I agree, the flag drippers are the best for low pressure.

To help keep out trash tuk50 can install a cheap in line filter.

Worth
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Old January 15, 2008   #21
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Easier than drilling holes and cheaper than the potential broken drill bits and frustration IMHO.
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Old January 15, 2008   #22
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tuk50 ,
Do you have hard water? or you just use rain water?

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Old January 15, 2008   #23
tuk50
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Very hard water with a lot of chlorine. And we get very little rain during the summer months, so I have to use a lot of irrigation. 8)
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Old January 15, 2008   #24
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You guys only get something like 12 inches of rain fall a year and it is in the winter.

We get around 36 inches a year but not much more than you guys in the summer.
I think we must have had a hundred this year.

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Old January 15, 2008   #25
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I suggest you add vineger to your barrel. Maybe a gallon or just half a gallom every other irrigation(whatever is ~1oz to the gallon of water). That lowers the PH and will control deposits. If your water is anything like we have in central and south central texas it is alkaline with lots of calcium as well.
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Old January 15, 2008   #26
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Yeah, its alkaline as is the soil, so I use sulfur once a year in the spring and it really has helped the size and production of most of my vegetables.
We really have two growing seasons, the first one in the spring and the second starting with what we call monsoons starting in July, but not much rain just light showers and if the tomatoes survive the heat in June they will start blooming again and I get a good crop in the fall. 8)
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Old January 15, 2008   #27
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I hope we have helped you and I am tired see you tomorrow.
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Old January 15, 2008   #28
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Definitely helped a lot! I had no idea that the water pressure would be so low which in turn hinders the large even flow. I'm going to a hole by each plant about 50, and they will be tiny, from there If it doesn't work I'll have to hook back up to the drip system on the tap. I really like the barrel system also to make weak compost teas to help fertilize during the growing system. I really appreciate all the input! I'll keep you posted. 8)
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Old January 15, 2008   #29
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Some more random thoughts:

1. Tank system is good if your water system is dirty. It gives particles a chance to settle.

2. If you hook up the system to tap, them pressure is equal throughout the pipes, assuming the pipes are not too small and drip holes are not too big.

3. If you hook up to tap and ridgid long pipes are used, than you may want to consider a "water hammer arrestor" at the end of the pipe. Water hammering can be very powerful and damaging in long pipes.

4. In figuring water pressure in a tank system, it is the height of the water that counts, it makes no difference how big (wide) the tank is.

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Old January 15, 2008   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
A gallon of water weighs 8 1/3 pounds or 8.33

There are 7.5 gallons of water in 1 cubic foot.
55 gallons of water would weigh around 458.15 pounds and contain I think 7.3 cubic feet.
worth
Isn't it true that "55 gallon drum" is a generic name, actually it is 45 gallons?

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