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Old September 23, 2019   #31
Greatgardens
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I don't know how long it will produce, yet. I've been picking small amounts for maybe two weeks. The plant is still full of green toms. I think this will be the largest picking, but it will surely go well into October. Medium flavor, probably a 7? To me decidedly better flavor than Celebrity. Not as good as Mat-Su Express. These need to be fully ripe. "this would be the one" -- well that's what I think this year, at least! ;-)

Last edited by Greatgardens; September 23, 2019 at 08:04 PM.
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Old September 24, 2019   #32
KarenO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Hempel View Post
This is the first year I am growing varieties from KarenO as well, and they are very vigorous, and more disease resistant than plants near them. Some of the nearby plants include commercial hybrids.
I’m so happy to know they are all doing well in your field Fred.
I’m really excited you are growing them and that they could wind up in the hands of one of the chefs you deal with
K
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Old September 26, 2019   #33
oakley
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I can add to that.
I had a spare KARMAPink that I grew on my kitchen deck in a 5 gal fabric pot.
It took off with little care due to long work hours. Supported by my Meyer lemon tree.
In a storm one strong flowering branch broke off completely. I jammed it in a pot with
a hot pepper plant, (in full sun). It also took of and gave clusters of fruit. I just let it
cascade rambling style.
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Old September 26, 2019   #34
oakley
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-an excellent size tomato for stuffing with herbed goat cheese and baking/roasting
in a 325 oven just 20 min till hot and warmed through
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Old September 26, 2019   #35
KarenO
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-an excellent size tomato for stuffing with herbed goat cheese and baking/roasting
in a 325 oven just 20 min till hot and warmed through
That sounds delicious I’m happy they did well for you in less than ideal circumstances, I find my plants to be doing well in pots also although caution with watering is needed to prevent splitting as they have a thin skin.
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Old October 11, 2019   #36
Greatgardens
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Default Stellar: Final Thoughts

This is one producing tomato for a very tidy plant that is about 4 ft tall and maybe 3 ft wide. I have picked over 60 tomatoes thus far, and determinate or not, this one will be producing when killed by cold weather. Twenty-five lbs thus far is a conservative estimate. It is a machine! Now, the "but" -- it doesn't have the sweetness I'd prefer, and that may be just the lack of leaf area to support all those tomatoes. For processing, this would be a good choice, I think. I may not grow it next season because it produces too many tomatoes!

So I'm still searching for that "perfect tomato." It would be PL, disease-resistant, a tidy semi-determinate or compact indeterminate, crack and split resistant, attractive, and that great sweet-tart taste. Maybe you know the one I'm still looking for?
GG
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #37
shule1
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Originally Posted by Barb_FL View Post
So surprised to hear Juliet mentioned. I grew it back in the day, and it was foolproof but how does it taste?

Thick skin or thin?

Sweet?

----
My neighbor gifted me some Juliet F1 tomatoes. They were quite sweet. They were firm and maybe two inches long. The skin didn't seem abnormally thin or thick. I didn't assess the skin, but it didn't interfere with my enjoyment of the tomatoes. The fruits were really good. They were sourced from two gardens.

Last edited by shule1; 3 Weeks Ago at 02:55 AM.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #38
Tormato
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In cold, wet, windy conditions, from tiny seedlings to full grown plant, Dingwall Scotty is the hardiest I've seen. But, for me, it simply tastes awful.


In hot, sunny conditions, Enduro #1 might be my hardiest variety. If I get around to trialing it, maybe I'll find out.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #39
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genuwine survived the various blights but the tomatoes on it now are still green.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #40
Labradors2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatgardens View Post
So I'm still searching for that "perfect tomato." It would be PL, disease-resistant, a tidy semi-determinate or compact indeterminate, crack and split resistant, attractive, and that great sweet-tart taste. Maybe you know the one I'm still looking for?
GG
Greatgardens, I think you're looking for a McIntosh apple! I love them BTW.

I wonder if you would like Dwarf Sweet Scarlett? That one is a little too tart for me when eaten raw, but I'll be growing it next season for cooking as it's divine halved and cooked with bacon and egg for breakfast .

Linda
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #41
shule1
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Linda, That's my favorite apple! We had a semi-dwarf McIntosh apple tree for most of my life. However, after the spider mites and drought got to it for several years (recently), it got a disease of some kind and grew mushrooms out of its bark. It was a great tree, though. It definitely did better with a lawn around it than plain dirt, however.

We cut all our trees down a while back (mostly for safety reasons so they wouldn't fall on houses, but those were the shade trees). The fruit trees had diseases or other issues, though; that's why they got cut down.

Last edited by shule1; 3 Weeks Ago at 10:06 PM.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #42
shule1
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@oakley It looks like your lemon tree is growing tomatoes!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #43
Barb_FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatgardens View Post
....
So I'm still searching for that "perfect tomato." It would be PL, disease-resistant, a tidy semi-determinate or compact indeterminate, crack and split resistant, attractive, and that great sweet-tart taste. Maybe you know the one I'm still looking for?
GG
Not PL, but I think Damsel fits the bill (at least in Florida). It's indeterminate but hot huge at all. During my 2018-2019 season, I pulled it in July after I stopped watering it. Any only grew it in a 5 gallon root pouch.

It's attractive but not THAT perfect like some of the hybrids - tomatoes stayed consistent throughout the season.


----
Come to think of it, my Polish was PL, didn't crack, wasn't huge, I don't know about disease resistant b/c I grow it containers, was my favorite large tomato for taste. Not near as productive as your Stellar.

Also, will have to let you know, but I'm growing a bunch of the Chef Choice tomatoes, and the Chef Choice Pink was PL.... Too early to speak of any of your other qualities but will update when I know more.

Last edited by Barb_FL; 3 Weeks Ago at 11:18 PM.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #44
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I've likely tasted between 100 and 200 apple varieties. The best sweet /tart apple I've tried may be Reine des Reinettes. McIntosh would be near, or at the bottom, of my list.


Much like heirloom tomatoes, once you get past the few widely available commercial varieties, there's a world of much more flavorful apples out there.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #45
Labradors2
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Very interesting Tormato! I can't say that I've tasted very many apple varieties beyond the grocery store ones and those that they grow at the orchard near here. It's fortunate that I love the Macs from my own tree which are a little sweeter than our Liberty apples. I'm so disappointed in our Courtland tree as I used to love that variety. I will look out for Reine des Reinettes!

Pink Lady is a favourite of mine when I have to buy them .

Linda
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