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Old June 29, 2017   #1
mensplace
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Default FRENCH Tarragon

Anyone have real French Tarragon?
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Old June 29, 2017   #2
clkeiper
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yep, I bought a pot last year... it is taking a looooong time to grow. I tried a few cuttings earlier and got 1 to take, need to try again. seems lots of people want it,,,, but it just tastes a bit like licorice to me.
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Old June 29, 2017   #3
Ambiorix
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TETRAGONE in french :TETRAGONIA
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Old July 3, 2017   #4
salix
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I have 3 plants - surprisingly, it grows well up here and overwinters well.
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Old July 3, 2017   #5
mensplace
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I am beginning to wonder whether tarragon simply doesn't do well down her in Georgia. I haven't found any in the many different nurseries. Or, it could simply be the fact that it cannot be grown from seed. However, there are some dishes that are made so much better with the subtle flavor that only it provides. I'm leery of the online providers and the cost of one plant plus shipping is high. Too, I wouldn't be surprised if some actually offer Russian Tarragon since that can be grown from seed. I've never tasted a side by side comparison.
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Old July 3, 2017   #6
Redbaron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensplace View Post
I am beginning to wonder whether tarragon simply doesn't do well down her in Georgia. I haven't found any in the many different nurseries. Or, it could simply be the fact that it cannot be grown from seed. However, there are some dishes that are made so much better with the subtle flavor that only it provides. I'm leery of the online providers and the cost of one plant plus shipping is high. Too, I wouldn't be surprised if some actually offer Russian Tarragon since that can be grown from seed. I've never tasted a side by side comparison.
agreed. I just use Mexican tarragon. It grows from seed and is close enough.

However you are right, the real deal is better.
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Old July 3, 2017   #7
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I need to pick some up at the store but I keep forgetting it.
I loved it in things like chicken and dumplings.
Tomorrow I am going to put some in shrimp fettuccine.
One of the few fish and cheese dishes I will eat.
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Old July 3, 2017   #8
oakley
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Yes, the real one does well in the North and over-winters.
Most nurseries have it.

Love it with coarse chopped tomatoes as a side with steak.
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Old July 3, 2017   #9
kayrobbins
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In the south we can grow it in the fall and winter but it can't take the heat and humidity. I buy my plants from a local herb farm each fall. I really should try to bring it inside for the summer and see if I can keep it alive. I do have lot of Mexican Tarragon growing. If you don't let it bloom and only use the very young tender growth it is an acceptable substitute for the French.
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Old July 3, 2017   #10
Worth1
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I read that almost all French tarragon is propagated by way of clones like rosemary.
I read the Spanish tarragon has the licorice flavor I like.
Whatever the case I think they have it in bulk at the store.
I hope so it is all I can think about here at work.
Wires and tarragon.
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Old July 11, 2017   #11
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I had French tarragon for years, but it finally died. I did take some cuttings from it to give to friends. Unfortunately, I didn't use it enough, or as much as other herbs I like more.

I've grown Spanish mace (tarragon) and though it grew well, after I collected seed and tried it the next year, it germinated weakly.

I haven't replanted either, just added more of what I like most, such as thyme.
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Old July 13, 2017   #12
SueCT
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I ordered my plants online from A Tasteful Garden about 5 years ago, and they still come back every year. I don't think they have any right now, but you might consider them for next spring.
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Old July 15, 2017   #13
gorbelly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensplace View Post
I am beginning to wonder whether tarragon simply doesn't do well down her in Georgia.
Yes, French tarragon hates heat over 90 and excessive humidity. In the South, maybe you can grow it in a pot if you take it inside in the summer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
I read that almost all French tarragon is propagated by way of clones like rosemary.
French tarragon doesn't bloom often and any seeds are usually sterile. So it's not seed-grown. If you see anyone advertising seeds for French tarragon, it's probably someone trying to scam folks with Russian tarragon, which is inferior in flavor and intensity.

To share a French tarragon plant, you have to root a cutting or, more reliably, carefully take a root cutting in spring when the plant is just starting to push out new growth after the winter.

Mexican tarragon is recommended in the south. It's not a true tarragon--it's a marigold--but the flavor is similar enough.
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Old July 15, 2017   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gorbelly View Post
French tarragon doesn't bloom often and any seeds are usually sterile. So it's not seed-grown. If you see anyone advertising seeds for French tarragon, it's probably someone trying to scam folks with Russian tarragon, which is inferior in flavor and intensity.
I had seeds once. Came with a little tag certifying I believe it was either 10 or 20% germination rate and they were extremely expensive. I couldn't get any to germinate though.

So I go with mexican tarragon.
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Old August 20, 2017   #15
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I love tarragon. But down here they cannot tolerate the heat.

As gorbelly wrote, any seeds sold as tarragon is Russian Tarragon which is not related to tarragon. . Same goes for mexican and Spanish tarragon.
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