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Old July 15, 2015   #16
Longlake
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I plant cilantro early and often, filling every nook and cranny available. There is one variety, Calypso, that has been far slower to bolt for me. I'm actually waiting for it to bolt so I can save seeds, but it's still nice and compact. It's the only variety that's actually lasted longer for me. Caribe and Slo-Bolt (sp?) were a bust for me last year, bolting as quickly as the self-seeded stuff that comes up every year.
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Old July 28, 2015   #17
TexasTycoon
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Annnnnnd this is why it's worth growing your own cilantro, even with it being so cheap in grocery stores here: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/health/Me...318683481.html
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Old July 29, 2015   #18
Gerardo
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A few drops of iodine and a 10-15 min rinse takes care of pretty much all pathogens quite nicely.

I hate to be the one to say it, but if ppl are too lazy to wash high risk foods (strawberries, cilantro, lettuces, etc) then they deserve to spray at both ends.
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Old July 29, 2015   #19
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerardo View Post
A few drops of iodine and a 10-15 min rinse takes care of pretty much all pathogens quite nicely.

I hate to be the one to say it, but if ppl are too lazy to wash high risk foods (strawberries, cilantro, lettuces, etc) then they deserve to spray at both ends.
I had that happen in Italy from a bad sandwich, I took one bite knew it was bad but it was too late.
To this day I will not eat pre-made sandwiches from any place.
I have seen this stuff several days old in the airport.

As far as the stuff in the store if there is feces there is more than likely parasites, human parasites.

I'm getting creeped out.

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Old July 29, 2015   #20
Ken B
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I really love cilantro, will go to extra trouble to get it to germinate in the summer. Germinating it in hot weather is the main challenge -- once you've coaxed it into germinating, it'll be fine. (But, as folks have said, it bolts fast in the heat, so do need to do succession sowings once a month.)

Folks already mentioned growing it in the shade... adding on to that:
-- I'll sometimes put the seed in the fridge or the freezer for a few days beforehand.
-- Sow seeds in the evening, water in with cold water.
-- After covering seeds with dirt, then shade the soil with burlap, brown paper bags, cardboard, etc. til the seedlings emerge (5-7 days). As soon as the seedlings emerge, take the burlap etc. off right away, otherwise the grasshoppers and other bugs that're also enjoying the shade under there will enjoy eating the blanched and tender seedlings...
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Old July 29, 2015   #21
GardeningCook
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I've never had any problems germinating Cilantro. No chilling necessary - great germination right out of the seed packet. But what with the heat & humidity here in Virginia, I've only had success after germination with diligent successive sowings every couple of weeks. As soon as one sowing starts breaking & is a few inches tall, I start another section. Pretty much keeps me in Cilantro all season long.
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