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Old August 9, 2019   #76
PureHarvest
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Can you expand more on the "how I will make money from this this year"?
I talk to farmers every day in my work, and there is obviously a lot of interest in hemp.
I have yet to get an answer from anyone on how it will be sold and marketed or how they will make money moving forward.
I know this is regional, but here, everyone seems to be reading the same internet article on how you can make 100k on hemp and they are ready to jump in without even thinking through how that would work.
Nice setup btw.
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Old August 9, 2019   #77
Cole_Robbie
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Originally Posted by PureHarvest View Post
Can you expand more on the "how I will make money from this this year"?
I talk to farmers every day in my work, and there is obviously a lot of interest in hemp.
I have yet to get an answer from anyone on how it will be sold and marketed or how they will make money moving forward.
I know this is regional, but here, everyone seems to be reading the same internet article on how you can make 100k on hemp and they are ready to jump in without even thinking through how that would work.
Nice setup btw.
Thanks. The price for hemp flower right now is $800-$1000 per pound, and that is if you can find it available for sale. More will come on the market this fall as new crops are harvested, so that price might drop, but it still beats my $2 per pound tomatoes. A good friend of mine is a buyer for the cbd isolate industry, so I have no worries about selling it.

The biggest obstacle to farmers I know is that hemp is not the typical corn, beans, and wheat. It is more like growing acres of tomatoes in regard to the labor required. There is no roundup ready hemp (yet). Farmers I have met in Kentucky often employ migrant labor.

The second biggest obstacle is not getting ripped off. Fantastic sums of money draw shady people after a quick buck. Feminized hemp seed goes for about $20,000 per pound, seed for fiber is $35 per pound, and you cannot tell them apart until after they sprout. So there is an easy scam to run right there. I would be hesitant to trust an anonymous web site to sell me seed.

So the capital to get started, the labor to keep going, and the good fortune/street smarts to not get scammed are all important in my view. I would like to get involved with the local small farms I know and set them up as clone factories. I have been collecting the best genetics, which usually require large investments, no one sells plants in fewer quantities than thousands at a time. So I could set them up with supplies and plants, then find a buyer for them when they have cuttings to sell. When things go well, there is a lot of money to be made, and everyone involved gets paid. Merely brokering plant deals to farmers is quite lucrative.
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Old August 9, 2019   #78
Cole_Robbie
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Nice Job!
Thanks, man. Now would be a great time to plan out your hemp patch for next year and get a cover crop planted, if you are still interested in growing.
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Old August 9, 2019   #79
Cole_Robbie
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The plants look terrific, Cole! Really like your savvy grow plan too. Best kind of soil, no till and no weeding! Nice.
Thank you. The no till thing just rocks peoples' worldviews. "What do you mean you don't till? How can you plant without tilling?"

We were actually rushed on planting and did not get the weed cloth down in time to soften the ground, so we made planting holes with a drill and an auger bit. The ground was quite firm, but it did soften over time under the fabric. My plants never got watered, either. The cloth conserves moisture. New plants in tilled ground must be watered frequently in hot dry weather. Hemp can "test hot" under drought conditions, meaning the thc levels spike up from the stress. I think no till will help prevent that from happening.

And the worms! I even see them when mowing and trimming grass. The sod is full of huge earthworms. They like to eat the decomposing sod under the fabric, too. I was in a tilled field last week and thought to myself, good luck trying to find a worm out here. Even the grass that grows back after tilling is sickly and yellow. Conventional agriculture, whether it be cultivating or roundup no till, I am convinced just murders soil.
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Old August 9, 2019   #80
slugworth
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They grew it here during colonial times for rope making to support the ship building trade.
Too much red tape even for commercial growers.Only 1 in the state so far that is authorized
to grow.For individuals forget about it.You need special licenses and permits and a note from
your mother.
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Old August 9, 2019   #81
Cole_Robbie
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They grew it here during colonial times for rope making to support the ship building trade.
Too much red tape even for commercial growers.Only 1 in the state so far that is authorized
to grow.For individuals forget about it.You need special licenses and permits and a note from
your mother.
That sounds like the way my state is for recreational cannabis.

Hemp was an important war material until steam power took over. In addition to cordage, the sails were hemp, and the fibers were also mixed into whatever they used to patch cracks between timbers, probably tar or pine resin. That's why colonial settlers were encouraged, sometimes even required to grow it, and allowed to pay their taxes with it. Hemp was vital to our national defense as a young nation.
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Old August 9, 2019   #82
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I think they even ate the seeds or got oil from the seeds
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Old August 9, 2019   #83
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My paternal grandparents grew it during WW2 & my maternal grandparents grew sweet potatoes. Both were approached by the government to do so. The hemp was a real moneymaker compared to the sweet potatoes according to my 84 year old uncle.
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Old August 9, 2019   #84
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I have used hemp fibers as mulch in my raised beds and greenhouse. I ordered the stuff from a company, which is trying to promote and make all sorts of products from industrial hemp. I wanted try to grow the tall hemp as ground cover last year, but the summer was so dry that the seeds germinated poorly and too late. I had few plants, which I germinated indoors to test the seeds and those grew to three meters. I saved the stalks and use those now to support tall growing peas.

I like taste of the organic hemp seeds and oil, which are sold in grocery stores here. The seeds have nice nutty flavor and are great in yogurt.

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Old August 9, 2019   #85
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Big problems for farmers in Nebraska wanting to grow commercial hemp. The only permissible means of growing hemp in the state is through university research. But even researchers have faced a series of hurdles that have meant not a single hemp growing operation has launched in Nebraska. There is an exception for pilot programs, but in Nebraska, a state bill to allow farmers to apply for this exception was thwarted by senators and police officials who feared hemp would be a gateway crop to recreational marijuana. An amended bill passed that limits hemp to university research.

The Hemp Industries Association estimates some $573m of goods containing hemp were sold in the United States in 2015, almost all of it imported. These goods included foods, supplements, body care products, clothing, auto parts, insulation and construction materials and medicine.

According to advocates, hemp is as American as apple pie. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams all grew hemp, which was used for paper, rope and cloth. The first flag of the United States, sewn by Betsy Ross, is said to have been made from hemp, and the Declaration of Independence was drafted on hemp paper.

This information was taken from an article in the Guardian written by Nebraska writer David Steen Martin in Eagle, Nebraska.
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Old August 9, 2019   #86
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Reefer madness 2019 remake
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Old August 9, 2019   #87
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Reefer madness 2019 remake
Right.
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