Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old March 21, 2019   #16
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default

Hi there, nice to see you Bower, and thank you. No worries about rising sea levels, I'll never be able to afford living close enough to it.

I'm fine tuning my strategy as I go, one critical element is to keep the commitment relatively smaller this year. Fewer of everything -ha. Yes I know it's easier said than done, but really that's what needs to happen when gone for 3 weeks during the prime time. A month really including a few days before and a few after, getting ready and recovering.

Well I practiced that economy yesterday when I ordered seed from SSE, all flowers for DW, and 1 (that is ONE) pack of tomato seeds, Speckled Roman. Never had much luck with romas, and wanted something new. Plus this one is so beautiful.

New seeds sprouted yesterday: finally the first peppers, about 19 days after seeding. I'm a bit worried the trays are getting too hot, I'm using a larger mat (20x20) and it gets very hot in the middle. I wanted to make sure they're warm enough. They'll either sprout or be cooked.

I also got germination of Sylvia lettuce, from a 2nd batch I seeded on sunday. Those were new seeds that I collected last summer. The previous batch I started was from older seed, and NONE germinated yet, after 2 weeks+. Both on heat mats, no other variables except age of seed -so I'm learning a lot about that, depending on the type of plant, it makes a big difference.

Yesterday was the first day of spring, it feels good. Hope you're all doing well.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29, 2019   #17
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default Time to go out?

Have been watching the forecast and temperature predictions, looking for a long stretch of above freezing temps at night. A couple of my trays of the hardier types could probably go out anytime now, I was hoping yesterday or today. But then we're expecting Sunday and Monday nights to be 30 and below. Will keep monitoring but do you guys think the below could handle 30 deg?

Walla-wallas, I'm thinking of trimming the tops and using them in a salad, they look so appealing.
WW-28mar19.jpg

Various greens, lettuce and cabbages.

greens-28mar19.jpg

DW's zinias. I never ever planted flowers, can these guys go out now? The pansies (not shown) are still little, they look a bit stunted (?) But saw a bunch of them already for sale at the Depot and understand they are hardy.
zinias-28mar19.jpg
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29, 2019   #18
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default

And here's the group photo.

group-photo.jpg

I have various other trays spread out on other shelves and table tops. My first batch of tomato seeds are out.I forgot to check frequently enough on some of them and they germinated and grew in the darkness for a day or two, and so got leggy. But once they have a couple leaves I'll re-pot them a bit deep, and all will be well. They'll be the right size during my 3-week absence, small enough to be easy to water and take out when the time comes.

I'm beginning to notice the difference in germination between newer and older seeds, of course under the same conditions. My pepper trays are way behind, maybe I over-heated them. Don't care too much in this case, keeping the operation on the smaller side this year will be a must. I finally concluded that I wont be planting the "older" (remote) garden this year. I need to keep things manageable this summer and will have plenty to do. Mid season I will clean it up -weeding and probably put in a weed barrier and get it ready for 2020. I still have enough sauce from last year, so no need to produce as much. Also planning another 2-week trip late september...

To the folks up north, let me know when you're planning to start taking your babies out.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 31, 2019   #19
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,521
Default

They all look great, Taboule! Those onions wouldn't mind a 'haircut' one bit before you plant them out, so... enjoy!

We are so far behind you ... will certainly be a late/cold spring as there is a record amount of sea ice around the island, and when that does clear, it'll be icebergs next. I haven't even started tomatoes yet.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 31, 2019   #20
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: 25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas.
Posts: 37,952
Default

First all looks really nice.
Next a question, you didn't pull the base boards before you put the floor down.
Why is that?
Does the wood not swell and shrink or is it stable?

Best of luck this year.
__________________
A Falling Knife Has No Handle

Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 31, 2019   #21
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default

Bower, thanks, I'll trim these onions the next day or two and have my first treat of the season. We had a high of 66 F yesterday (19C to our Canadian friends), 61 F today (16C) but rainy. I spent a bit of time yesterday cleaning the beds, and wanted to do the same today -alas, we have rain. Monday night is expected to be very cold, 25F/-4C, otherwise extended forecast is all above freezing. So will definitely start taking my babies out.

Worth, thank you. WRT installing the HW floor, I understand about wood movement across the grain. Here are my thoughts to that, a bit long.

1) As you said, that particular flooring is pre-finished and very stable. It's left to acclimate in the space before installation, and I nail it down solid -it's not going anywhere. I've done similar jobs many times with no issues, this one is a small room -very little movement.

2) Although in theory leaving a small gap under the base could be useful to hide any movement, I dont understand how the outside boards can move anywhere close to the recommended 1/4". They're supposed to be tightly secured to the sub-floor, they don't float.

I've seen this type of construction (HW planks butting against base) in many older houses that were still in great condition. I once visited in Northern NH a huge mansion/estate whose well-off owner was restoring into a fancy resort. He was sparing no expense, with some of the fanciest woodwork I've seen anywhere. I visited with the master craftsman who was showing me his work. In one of the rooms he had redone, I noticed he had the base down before the new floor was put in. When asked, he insisted that as far as he knew, that's how it's always been done. And this was for the sand/finish in place type.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 31, 2019   #22
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: 25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas.
Posts: 37,952
Default

I think it has a lot to do with acclamation too and the type of wood you use.
I dont know if you know but I put one down in my garage.
Here is the floor after I did it, and how i used a wedge to jam the flooring together when I got close to the wall.
The rest was done with a flooring nail gun air assisted.

White oak red oak mix utility grade I rented a sander too.
Finish real tung oil.
1231001139ar.jpg

IMG_0031r.jpg
__________________
A Falling Knife Has No Handle

Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 31, 2019   #23
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default

Nice and fancy floor for a garage, I dont remember seeing it before -but I dont remember too many things lately What's the subfloor, I can't tell behind/below that tar paper (?) You must have used MANY nails, some of those strips are short ;-)

I used the wedge trick too along the edges, but do as well now (and faster) using a short pry bar with sacrificial scraps towards good surfaces.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 31, 2019   #24
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: 25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas.
Posts: 37,952
Default

2x4 sleepers on side vapor barrier and 3/4 OSB tongue and groove 4 foot by 8 foot, felt paper and then the flooring.
__________________
A Falling Knife Has No Handle

Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 1, 2019   #25
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
2x4 sleepers on side vapor barrier and 3/4 OSB tongue and groove 4 foot by 8 foot, felt paper and then the flooring.
Worth, solid construction, wood floors are nice on the feet (and dropped tools) in the shop.

So I did my first harvest and taste last night, there was enough for a garnish for a salad. So nice not having to wash it before munching, tasty.

Shown next to the fine China plate is the only new (to me) tomato I'm growing this year, Speckled Roman. You can faintly see in the photo thin specks of yellow/orange. It's also the only paste I'm growing this year, I've almost given up on those a couple years ago. But SSE claims these are good eating fresh too, and it is so pretty, decided to give it a try.

WWsnips-31mar19.jpg

Woke up to 34F this morning, I'm glad I resisted the urge to take out any plants yesterday. Tonight's low is expected at 26F. Then again at 28F for Thursday night-hopefully the last cold one for the early season.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 1, 2019   #26
PlainJane
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: North Florida
Posts: 927
Default

Zinnias would not be happy at those temps. Pansies however seem to come through anything; they’d get a few frosted leaves is all.
PlainJane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 1, 2019   #27
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default

Thanks Jane, I'll sit tight for another week.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 15, 2019   #28
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default

Greetings,

So last weekend I decided to take the plunge and took out the first young plants for hardening. The walla-walla onions, some greens (lettuce+ cabbage) and the first batch of pansies (for DW.) This stone patio absorbs some of the sun's heat and gives it back at night.
first-out.jpg
We've since had a couple nights in the low 30's, but everyone did fine. Then this weekend, Saturday was in the high 60s, then it hit 74F on Sunday. I finished prepping one large bed:gentle hand till/turn (the compost had settled a lot under the snow load), added 2x bales of peat, a large bag of perlite, and mixed in some organic food. End result was nice and fluffy like potting mix. This is Giant Cesar, 2 or 3 plants per jiffy puck (the extra large size).
giant-cesar.jpg

tbc...

Last edited by taboule; April 15, 2019 at 08:59 PM.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 15, 2019   #29
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 832
Default In the ground

Two week forecast has lows over 40F, and I'm running out of time before my trip. i want to leave as little as possible for DW to tend, so finished this half bed before the rain on sunday.

in-the-ground-14apr19.jpg

In-between the two side rows I'll seed some kale or chard.Many of the pucks had 3 or more plants, and I did separate what I could, hopefully didn't kill many. I understand they're not as hardy as tomatoes, they have tons of small hair-like roots. In the bunch were also a few baby bock choys (far left), and Sylvia lettuce (variegated red leaf). Then some parsley (far right).

Back inside, I've been up-potting the tomatoes, here's one batch out of a few.

young-adults-15apr19.jpg

DW was chatting and said "you'll have a lot on your plate the next 2 months." I said yes, will downsize and not plant the"remote" garden, to lessen the load. She asked why would I want to do that, since I enjoy it so much. She suggested I sleep on it and reconsider. She's a keeper ;>)

Last edited by taboule; April 15, 2019 at 09:01 PM.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19, 2019   #30
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,521
Default

Taboule, that's a great porch for hardening off.
My faith in alliums is being renewed this cold spring, it looks like they're going to withstand our frosty weather and I'm sure your Walla walla's are happier in the ground than they would be to wait.


You have quite a season ahead of you and I'm very impressed with how much you have done to make it happen when you're not there. I hope it all works out for you. I bet your DW will have some delicious surprises for your return.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:03 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★