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Old June 10, 2019   #46
brooksville
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Does grafting to a rootstock that is TSWV resistant help or is it a marketing gimmick?
John
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Old June 11, 2019   #47
Father'sDaughter
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Long story short -- almost all of my grafts failed this year. Partly due to neglect as work spiraled out of control this spring, and partly due to a nearby window being opened and mistakenly left open right at the time when I was weaning them from the humidity chamber.

Only three grafted tomatoes and one grafted eggplant recovered, survived and were planted out today. For all the others I decided to say the heck with it, started new seeds, and just went graft-less this year since it was too late to start the process all over again.

Not sure what I'll have for a harvest, but I figure it'll be better than nothing, and all are being grown from saved seeds so other than the cost of time and some fertilizer, I won't be out much if disease takes hold and brings an early end to my season.
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Old June 11, 2019   #48
b54red
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooksville View Post
Does grafting to a rootstock that is TSWV resistant help or is it a marketing gimmick?
John
I think it is a gimmick but can't say for sure. The only thing I have seen that grafting makes sense for is soil born problems like nematodes, fusarium wilt or bacterial wilt. I have seen some dramatic increases in production with a few varieties but have also seen dramatic drops in production with some varieties that are grafted. Not all varieties work well with all root stocks so experiment with the varieties you really like with a couple of different root stocks and see which work out for you. As for TSWV my best advice is to plant some extra plants in the garden and have some seedlings ready in case you want to replace a plant that gets infected. I have tried quite a few of the TSWV resistant varieties and found most to be like supermarket tomatoes. The one exception that I found was Bella Rosa which is decent but not great tasting.

Bill
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Old June 11, 2019   #49
zendog
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I think Bill is basically right. If it isn't limited to the soil, the rootstock won't be able to keep it away and I can't see how a rootstock would be able to convey any other type of resistance to the scion.

But I do find that grafting does provide some help in overcoming foliar issues. Basically a well fed grafted plant can put on new growth faster and stays a bit stronger so if I'm taking off diseases lower leaves, for instance, it has a better chance of powering on and producing. Similarly, a healthy vigorous plant will generally be less likely to be as effected in the first place, at least from some things. I find that it is when I've been bad at keeping the plants adequately watered or they have other stresses, that they're more likely to start contracting stuff or being attacked by aphids, etc.

I don't think that would do much for TSWV though.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #50
Father'sDaughter
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Quick check in -- my grafted plants started out so promising this spring, but while I was starting to wean them out of the humidity chamber, we were having a bit of a warm weather spell and the window near my trays got opened. By the time I discovered what was happening, all my grafts had badly wilted. They never did recover.

I restarted seeds, but did not have enough rootstock seeds or time left to do another round of grafts, so the plants went out on their own roots this year.

As in past years, early growth and fruit set was great on the non grafted plants, but after a minimal harvest, the plants are starting to quickly succumb to disease. Definitely V showing early, and now the bright yellow leaves with top wilting has started. I was expecting it so it's not as heartbreaking as in past years, but it reinforces the need for all the time and effort spent on grafting in the spring.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #51
Greatgardens
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Originally Posted by Father'sDaughter View Post
(snip...)

As in past years, early growth and fruit set was great on the non grafted plants, but after a minimal harvest, the plants are starting to quickly succumb to disease. Definitely V showing early, and now the bright yellow leaves with top wilting has started. I was expecting it so it's not as heartbreaking as in past years, but it reinforces the need for all the time and effort spent on grafting in the spring.

So bright yellow leaves is a symptom of Vert.? I am curious because I planted a "Red Brandywine" several years ago, and after filled with immature fruit, almost overnight the leaves turned bright yellow. Wilting followed, and I suspected Vert., but never really knew. I have always had trouble with eggplant getting wilt, so I was pretty sure it is in my soil. I've never had that happen with tomatoes before or after that incident.
-GG
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #52
Father'sDaughter
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While many say it's highly unlikely, I suspect I am also dealing with Fusarium as I see symptoms of both.

Either way, there is no treatment and once they are in your soil there isn't much you can do about it beyond planting resistant varieties and hoping to get somewhat of a harvest, or grafting onto resistant rootstock. If you only had the yellowing once and never again, it was likely caused by something else. Consider yourself lucky.


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