Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion for successfully cultivating potatoes, the world's fourth largest crop.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 22, 2018   #1
Brent M
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 134
Default Post-Harvest Dormancy

Hello all,

So, I've harvested some container potatoes and I'm wanting to replant some of the potatoes I just harvested and cycle, in this way, all year. To that end, I'm researching methods to break the post-harvest dormancy period, or at least, shorten it significantly. I'm wondering what experience folks have with methods or what your experience may be with it.

I've been using my own seed potatoes for years now and am not interested in purchasing seed potatoes annually. I certainly don't mind discussing anything, but my interest here is cycling my own all year. It's part of my experimenting nature. What is your experience, or thoughts, on overcoming dormancy? Thanks so much.

Brent
Brent M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 26, 2018   #2
GoDawgs
Tomatovillian™
 
GoDawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Georgia, 8a/7b
Posts: 305
Default

This topic is of interest to me as I want to play with one hill of potatoes planted in the fall using one of the Yukon Golds I just dug. I found two articles of interest. One is a scientific paper online about potato dormancy that described dormancy in detail (sometimes too much detail!) but once you get past the jargon there are a lot of little possible gems to play with.

“Physiological Mechanisms For Potato Dormancy Release And Sprouting: A Review”
F. MANI, T. BETT AIEB, N. DOUDECH and C. HANNACHI
High Agronomic Institut, P. O. Box 4042, Chott-Mariem, Tunisia
http://www.bioline.org.br/pdf?cs14016

Some highlights:

An overall description of tuber dormancy: “Tuber Dormancy”, page 156

Potatoes exhibit apical dominance. I knew this about shrubs but not about potatoes! An example of apical dominance would be where you prune off a shrub branch and the bud closest to the cut becomes the new leader. That is apical dominance. This paper states that potatoes also exhibit this trait. Removing the apical bud leads to more sprouting. “Apical Dominance”, page 157. I will try that next spring.

The authors list various things that can be used to break dormancy, including manipulation of environmental conditions, (“Role of environmental conditions”, page 158)

Also, dormancy is not related to earliness of varieties.

Another interesting article (and less “in the weeds”) is one from the International Potato Center entitled Dormancy And Sprouting Protocol:
https://research.cip.cgiar.org/confl...uting+Protocol

Highlights include storage temperature manipulation, harvest and post-harvest practices and apical dominance.

Of course, both studies are looking at ways to increase the length of dormancy with an eye towards keeping potatoes stored as long as possible for commercial reasons. But I’m thinking doing the opposite will shorted dormancy.

Couldn’t hurt to try!
GoDawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 26, 2018   #3
Brent M
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 134
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoDawgs View Post
This topic is of interest to me as I want to play with one hill of potatoes planted in the fall using one of the Yukon Golds I just dug. I found two articles of interest. One is a scientific paper online about potato dormancy that described dormancy in detail (sometimes too much detail!) but once you get past the jargon there are a lot of little possible gems to play with.

“Physiological Mechanisms For Potato Dormancy Release And Sprouting: A Review”
F. MANI, T. BETT AIEB, N. DOUDECH and C. HANNACHI
High Agronomic Institut, P. O. Box 4042, Chott-Mariem, Tunisia
http://www.bioline.org.br/pdf?cs14016

Some highlights:

An overall description of tuber dormancy: “Tuber Dormancy”, page 156

Potatoes exhibit apical dominance. I knew this about shrubs but not about potatoes! An example of apical dominance would be where you prune off a shrub branch and the bud closest to the cut becomes the new leader. That is apical dominance. This paper states that potatoes also exhibit this trait. Removing the apical bud leads to more sprouting. “Apical Dominance”, page 157. I will try that next spring.

The authors list various things that can be used to break dormancy, including manipulation of environmental conditions, (“Role of environmental conditions”, page 158)

Also, dormancy is not related to earliness of varieties.

Another interesting article (and less “in the weeds”) is one from the International Potato Center entitled Dormancy And Sprouting Protocol:
https://research.cip.cgiar.org/confl...uting+Protocol

Highlights include storage temperature manipulation, harvest and post-harvest practices and apical dominance.

Of course, both studies are looking at ways to increase the length of dormancy with an eye towards keeping potatoes stored as long as possible for commercial reasons. But I’m thinking doing the opposite will shorted dormancy.

Couldn’t hurt to try!
Hey Dawgs,
I see you've found the same articles. I've read all I could find. There's also some hormone manipulation work out there. I was hoping for something simpler. Some action that could reduce turn-around to a few weeks instead of months. I've got a question into Tom Wagner on it. I've seen a guy on YouTube bury them vs chitting them and the buds were longer, but the overall dormancy seemed about the same really. As a home gardener, I just want a constant cycle of my own potatoes year around. I could get that if I saved much more seed potatoes--a few from each container harvest--but that takes up more space. Just might not be doable at the moment, but worth asking.
Brent
Brent M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 26, 2018   #4
GoDawgs
Tomatovillian™
 
GoDawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Georgia, 8a/7b
Posts: 305
Default

One of the things mentioned in the first article was the use of ethelene gas and I immediately thought about the old "put an apple or two in the bag" trick to get some produce to ripe faster. I wonder how that would work with getting a potato to "age" faster towards chitting. Then break off the apical bud to encourage others.

I was planning on experimentally planting just one hill this fall of a recently dug Yukon Gold and was not aware that potatoes had a post-harvest dormancy. So you've helped me right there!

The article I read about fall planted potatoes that got me wondering about it said the potatoes did not come up until spring. They worked on developing a great root system so that when it warmed up and it was time to push up the plant, it did and went on to produce a lot more than if it were planted in the spring.

I think I will try the apple thing just for grins and giggles.
GoDawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 26, 2018   #5
Brent M
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 134
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoDawgs View Post
One of the things mentioned in the first article was the use of ethelene gas and I immediately thought about the old "put an apple or two in the bag" trick to get some produce to ripe faster. I wonder how that would work with getting a potato to "age" faster towards chitting. Then break off the apical bud to encourage others.

I was planning on experimentally planting just one hill this fall of a recently dug Yukon Gold and was not aware that potatoes had a post-harvest dormancy. So you've helped me right there!

The article I read about fall planted potatoes that got me wondering about it said the potatoes did not come up until spring. They worked on developing a great root system so that when it warmed up and it was time to push up the plant, it did and went on to produce a lot more than if it were planted in the spring.

I think I will try the apple thing just for grins and giggles.
I'm already trying that an ethylene experiment with ripening tomatoes in a ziplock bag. The potatoes were harvested 3 weeks ago (or so) and I've had the potato/tomato bag going for a week now. Nothing. That experiment actually prompted me trying to see if someone here has figured it out. Bummer, don't want to keep tons of seed potatoes waiting on time to use.
Brent M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #6
GoDawgs
Tomatovillian™
 
GoDawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Georgia, 8a/7b
Posts: 305
Default Dormancy Update

For what it's worth, the Red Norlands that were dug on June 21 are sprouting in the closet where they're stored. Probably started a week or so ago. No sign of chitting on the Yukon Golds in the same closet.
GoDawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #7
NathanP
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 162
Default

The USDA genebank has a document about breaking dormancy using Rindite. With a strong warning that it is very poisonous. See the bottom link on this page:
https://www.ars-grin.gov/nr6/coop.html

Last edited by NathanP; 3 Weeks Ago at 10:37 PM.
NathanP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #8
NathanP
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 162
Default

Regarding the mention of apical dominance, many potatoes do not have apical dominance. It has largely been bred out of the commercial potato genepool, but you can still find potatoes without that trait if you look at some heirloom varieties, especially fingerlings. Many South American traditional varieties also lack apical dominance. You can get some pretty interesting shapes, as they grow from multiple eyes outward when the plants get stressed.

This is Papa Chonca, a Chilean Fingerling-ish potato. This is the same potato clone grown in three soil types. From left to right, in a loam/clay container mix, in sandy loam, and in a soil with high clay content on the right. The middle ones, grown in sandy soil, were the most affected that year by a long stretch of the summer with no rain.









This one was TPS seedling of mine from 2015, and it grows like this when there is drought.


Last edited by NathanP; 3 Weeks Ago at 10:49 PM.
NathanP is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
overcoming potato dormancy , potato dormancy , seed potatoes

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:35 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★