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Old March 2, 2018   #1
GoDawgs
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Default Growing Beets In Georgia? Help!

Beets just don't seem to grow for me or for others in my area of east central Georgia. So many other folks can just seem to "sow and grow" so easily. I feel stupid not being able to do this as I've been gardening for years and am pretty successful with everything else. Do any of you other Georgians have success or failure?

Soaking the seed for a day before direct sowing made a big difference. At least they come up consistently now but it seems I just can't get them up past 2". They sit there and sulk. Fall planting (Aug, Sep and Oct), spring planting (Jan, Feb, and Mar), it doesn't make a difference. I've tried six different time frames and none work. This past fall looked promising and then when, at the 2" stage, we got a freeze they died later even after having been covered.

If anyone has a secret I sure would appreciate hearing it. I'd rather not do sets and transplant (as I read in another thread here) but just might try a few while once again I direct sow some seed this coming week. Soil temp is 64 so that shouldn't be an issue.
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Old March 22, 2018   #2
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Hi GoDawg, I can’t help you because I just moved to Macon GA, and I am starting a new garden. I have gardened in MS, WI, IN, AL and now GA. Seems like I finally get the feel for the gardening conditions of a state, then we move. Oh well...

I just sowed beets about a week ago - no germination yet. I would like to know if anyone responds to this post.
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Old March 23, 2018   #3
ScottinAtlanta
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I did well with golden beets in Atlanta last year - sowed them pretty late in April, and they seemed to like the warm weather. They don't seem to like cold feet.
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Old March 24, 2018   #4
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I'm doing the Detroit Red, nice inexpensive seed from the local feed & seed. No sense in buying other varieties from seed catalogues until I get the hang of growing them. They were sown on March 6 and the first ones finally started popping up March 16. Now on to the "thriving" part.

Scott, I will try another few feet in late April even though previous efforts usually get heat-beat in May.

Mudcat, welcome to Georgia where the soil can vary from sand to clay even in one garden plot! That's the Fall Line for ya. I'm in the Augusta area. There's rain coming in tonight and that might just trigger your beets to pop up. Sometimes it's taken two weeks for mine to come up once I started soaking them for a day before planting. If yours fail to come up after two weeks, you might consider soaking the next round of seeds for a day or two before planting.
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Old March 27, 2018   #5
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Quote:
Mudcat, welcome to Georgia where the soil can vary from sand to clay even in one garden plot! That's the Fall Line for ya. I'm in the Augusta area. There's rain coming in tonight and that might just trigger your beets to pop up. Sometimes it's taken two weeks for mine to come up once I started soaking them for a day before planting. If yours fail to come up after two weeks, you might consider soaking the next round of seeds for a day or two before planting.
My beets are germinating. I am growing Crosby's Egyptian, which I have never grown before, so 2 unknowns this season -- variety and weather.

Yes, I have sand and clay.... interesting soil. Very easy to dig. I assume that I will need to add plenty of fertilizer. I ordered a Soil Test Kit from UGA Extension, but I haven't completed it.

The weather is suppose to take a turn for the better just around the corner in April. I'm looking forward to that! ~Lisa
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Old April 1, 2018   #6
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Well, mine are now up about an inch and look healthy. That's a start.
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Old April 4, 2018   #7
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Well, mine are now up about an inch and look healthy. That's a start.
Very good! Mine are up, too, and beginning to show a little growth. Hooray!

I found my first sweet pea blossoms this morning.
~Lisa
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Old May 5, 2018   #8
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Wellllllll..... another failure except that at least there are a few plants in this short row that look like they might make it. Progress...

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Old May 11, 2018   #9
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So sorry! Mine appear to be doing very well. Is that wood ashes in your bed?
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Old May 12, 2018   #10
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Those are leaves. I rake a ton of them in the fall and mulch the beds with them. That's an old floor fan cover on the ground, protecting a newly seeded squash planting from a cat who likes to dig.
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Old May 12, 2018   #11
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I'm having trouble this year too. The temperature fluctuations seem to be confusing them. I started a few for transplants as an insurance policy and those didn't take either. I literally just came inside and had noticed that I left my baggie with the different beet seed packages out in the rain. I'll have a lot of seeds to plant asap. All sorts of critters like to eat the baby leaves so be sure to fence the area just in case you get some germination by luck or by chance.

- Lisa
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Old May 13, 2018   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
I'm having trouble this year too. The temperature fluctuations seem to be confusing them.
I'm beginning to think that I might have to add them to that "don't do well in varying temps" category. For sure, cauliflower is on my list.

I tried for four years, both spring and fall plantings staggered plantings of quick growing varieties and while the plants were pretty, the heads would discolor and go funky. Then I read something about cauliflower needing steady cool temps through the growing period. Well, forget that around here!

Brussels are problematic too even though I can grow pretty regular cabbage. Go figure.
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Old May 17, 2018   #13
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Is it at all possible to transplant beets? I know its not a common thing, and im no beet expert.
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Old May 17, 2018   #14
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Is it at all possible to transplant beets? I know its not a common thing, and im no beet expert.
I've read that you can but that it's not recommended, seeing that it's a tap root veg. I'm sure there are some folks out there that have been successful but geez, that would take up a lot of space under the lights!
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