Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating eggplants/aubergines.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 16, 2018   #16
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,031
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by clkeiper View Post
few people LOVE it and the rest pass it up not knowing what to do with it, I think.
Yeah, that seems to be a problem in places that don't really have a tradition in using these. There are ways to utilize them that make them really flavorful, it usually involves some sort of grilling or burning though, or at the least frying.
Imo, the ultimate way to use it is the so called salad, which involves burning the fruit on open fire, skin it, make a paste from the rest and inflate it with a good amount of oil (also add a tad of fine chopped onion or garlic, varies by region). I am the opposite of a vegetarian and still think this is one of the best foods ever. Goes great with tomatoes also. The use of high heat, preferably open fire is a must, the skin must crack in the process and let the steam go out for optimal results.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #17
FourOaks
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: NC
Posts: 511
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ibraash View Post
My eggplants were started the same day as the peppers, and they are doing way better than the peppers. The peppers are still in their firs sets of leaves, and the leaves are curled. Anybody knows what is happening to them??
I wouldnt really worry. They will most likely grow out of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zipcode View Post
Yeah, that seems to be a problem in places that don't really have a tradition in using these. There are ways to utilize them that make them really flavorful, it usually involves some sort of grilling or burning though, or at the least frying.
Imo, the ultimate way to use it is the so called salad, which involves burning the fruit on open fire, skin it, make a paste from the rest and inflate it with a good amount of oil (also add a tad of fine chopped onion or garlic, varies by region). I am the opposite of a vegetarian and still think this is one of the best foods ever. Goes great with tomatoes also. The use of high heat, preferably open fire is a must, the skin must crack in the process and let the steam go out for optimal results.
Well that sounds mighty dang tasty.
FourOaks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #18
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 3,662
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ibraash View Post
My eggplants were started the same day as the peppers, and they are doing way better than the peppers. The peppers are still in their firs sets of leaves, and the leaves are curled. Anybody knows what is happening to them??
double check your plans for aphids. I know that sounds early but that is what I notice first... curling leaves. if you have any, even one, winter over in your greenhouse or on a houseplant they will go to the new plants as soon as they can. trust me. been there done that.
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #19
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 3,662
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zipcode View Post
Yeah, that seems to be a problem in places that don't really have a tradition in using these. There are ways to utilize them that make them really flavorful, it usually involves some sort of grilling or burning though, or at the least frying.
Imo, the ultimate way to use it is the so called salad, which involves burning the fruit on open fire, skin it, make a paste from the rest and inflate it with a good amount of oil (also add a tad of fine chopped onion or garlic, varies by region). I am the opposite of a vegetarian and still think this is one of the best foods ever. Goes great with tomatoes also. The use of high heat, preferably open fire is a must, the skin must crack in the process and let the steam go out for optimal results.
I am going to have to try to make this to give away samples of it's flavor. can you just dip it with a cracker you think?
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #20
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,031
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by clkeiper View Post
I am going to have to try to make this to give away samples of it's flavor. can you just dip it with a cracker you think?
It should work yes, we usually eat it with bread. It goes great with tomatoes and/or some salty cheese, as well as various smoked meats (preferably the boiled/hot smoked vs the cold smoked ones)

I think it can be tricky to do by just what I said (it took me a few tries to get it right even knowing how my mom does it), so I'll try to present it in more detail here in case anyone wants to try it. I think the recipe is originally from Greece or Turkey.
For one portion (3-4 people) something like two nice sized eggplants, picked when elastic. So feel them, they should not be too soft or too hard, somewhat elastic and shiny. So I think immature but full size? (seeds should not be noticeable or barely). Very fat eggplants (like those italian round big ones) are not that good, hard for the heat to penetrate. We use in the range of 300-400g/fruit, somewhat slender 'normal' eggplants.

We use open gas flame (like the lateral burner of a grill) (there should be a way to come in direct contact with the fire). There will be a certain amount of dark liquid running around so I do a whole batch at once since it's messy. Can be frozen with excellent results (cooked but not prepared) for 1-2 years.
Just put it on the fire and turn a few times to cook the whole surface. You should turn it when the part exposed to the fire starts to become somewhat ashy (a few minutes, doesn't take long). It will crack a bit and steam (which smells fantastic) should come from it.
After you take it from the fire, the 'meat' should be fairly light coloured white-ish yellowish, slightly greenish. If it's more greenish than whiteish it usually suggests it's not cooked enough. I dip my hands in cold water and peel it with my hands while it's still hot (you can also leave it but the black charcoal colour will start to sip into the interior). The discarded part should not be too thick, a millimeter or so, and feel mostly crumbly and not too 'peely'.
Cut the green stem attachment off (usually this part will be a bit undercooked but it's ok), then along in two or three to allow the juices to run out for an hour or so (gets rid of most of the bitterness).
I then just make a puree with the mixer blade, add some salt, and add oil in the style of mayonnaise (don't mixer the oil, just use a spoon or whatever). It's hard to say how much, I think about 1/4 - 1/3 of the puree volume, I look for a certain shininess but not too much.
The way we always did it in my family is with onion, and I am biased towards it vs the garlic one (which seems more popular in those mentioned countries). For those 2 eggplants for example I would use a small shallot very finely cut.

That's it. It is usually not eaten warm, but room temperature. If you like the smell of that burning eggplant on fire you will absolutely love this recipe. It has a smooth texture, a bit smoky and really rich.

Last edited by zipcode; February 16, 2018 at 11:38 AM.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #21
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 3,662
Default

thank you zipcode. I might even run to the grocery store and buy a few just to learn the method before my season starts.
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #22
ibraash
Tomatovillian™
 
ibraash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Lawrenceville, GA
Posts: 162
Default

I just checked, and no aphids were to be found. I really hope it is not a virus of some sort

Many thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clkeiper View Post
double check your plans for aphids. I know that sounds early but that is what I notice first... curling leaves. if you have any, even one, winter over in your greenhouse or on a houseplant they will go to the new plants as soon as they can. trust me. been there done that.
ibraash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #23
ibraash
Tomatovillian™
 
ibraash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Lawrenceville, GA
Posts: 162
Default

Thank you for your reply.. I really hope they will grow out of it. Will keep you posted..

Quote:
Originally Posted by FourOaks View Post
I wouldnt really worry. They will most likely grow out of it.



Well that sounds mighty dang tasty.
ibraash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #24
oakley
Tomatovillian™
 
oakley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NewYork 5a
Posts: 1,952
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zipcode View Post
Yeah, that seems to be a problem in places that don't really have a tradition in using these. There are ways to utilize them that make them really flavorful, it usually involves some sort of grilling or burning though, or at the least frying.
Imo, the ultimate way to use it is the so called salad, which involves burning the fruit on open fire, skin it, make a paste from the rest and inflate it with a good amount of oil (also add a tad of fine chopped onion or garlic, varies by region). I am the opposite of a vegetarian and still think this is one of the best foods ever. Goes great with tomatoes also. The use of high heat, preferably open fire is a must, the skin must crack in the process and let the steam go out for optimal results.
My method as well. Fantastic with a toasted sesame/miso glaze, mustard
pickle, bonito flakes.
oakley is online now   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #25
Black Krim
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: New England
Posts: 592
Default

yikes. this explains poor production last year!!! Will plant tonight..or rather right now!
Black Krim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #26
SQWIBB
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Philly
Posts: 143
Default

I start eggplant seeds a week later than my peppers and a week earlier than my tomatoes. March 3rd this year
My biggest joy in the garden isn't my first red ripe tomato, it's my first eggplant, gawd I love that feeling.

By late august my wife is ready to divorce me because I have her making some type of eggplant dish every other day. She sees me come in from the garden and when she sees purple she just shakes her head.




I have made flour from it for pizza crust, just breaded and fried, in stews, eggplant parmigiana, Jambalaya, stuffed peppers, pizza topping, caponata, I even used it for burgers.

SQWIBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #27
Black Krim
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: New England
Posts: 592
Default

What are these burger looking yummies??
Black Krim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #28
SQWIBB
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Philly
Posts: 143
Default

Beef burgers with eggplant.
I shred the eggplant and add to some 80/20, doesn't really add flavor but really makes the burgers juicier,
SQWIBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #29
rhines81
Tomatovillian™
 
rhines81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Zone 5A, Poconos
Posts: 798
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ibraash View Post
The peppers are still in their firs sets of leaves, and the leaves are curled. Anybody knows what is happening to them??
For curled or slightly wilty looking leaves on a young pepper plant try a 1/2 tsp of Epsom salt per quart of water (2 tsp per gallon). Should be all perked up by the following day!
rhines81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2018   #30
Zeedman
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 255
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SQWIBB View Post
I start eggplant seeds a week later than my peppers and a week earlier than my tomatoes. March 3rd this year
That's about when I start mine also. They can be slow growing at first, but will catch up with & pass the peppers in a few weeks.

We grow several of the the long, Asian-type eggplant varieties. Our favorite ways to eat them are as battered & fried "fans"; chopped into an omelet; in a salad with fresh tomatoes & okra; or as one of the many vegetables in the Filipino soup pinakbet.

To make the "fans", we first steam the eggplant whole until cooked, then allow them to cool & peel them (we freeze a lot of them at that stage). With the stem still attached, we slice lengthwise several times away from the stem, then dip them into a spiced egg batter & fry them. After being flattened with the spatula, they widen at the blossom end, forming a fan shape. You hold them by the stem to eat them... all of our children & grandchildren love eggplant this way. Any remaining batter is scrambled with the pan leavings, which is how we discovered how good chopped eggplant omelets are.
Zeedman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:18 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★