Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion regarding garden diseases, insects and other unwelcome critters.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old May 3, 2018   #1
Ed of Somis
Tomatovillian™
 
Ed of Somis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Somis, Ca
Posts: 649
Default tomato disease again!

So, I had some trouble last year with this too. Several of my young plants are displaying unusual leaf growth. The leaves grow very narrow (sword-like). It can be described as "spindly" growth. There are no signs of bacterial/fungal problems. There is no black or yellow/brown spotting. The vigor is reduced, also. I have an idea what this is....not sure. What do you think? Sorry, I can't do pics (too old). Thanks in advance!
Ed of Somis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2018   #2
ginger2778
Florida TAG™ Coordinator
 
ginger2778's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Plantation, Florida zone 10
Posts: 8,804
Default

Impossible to help without pics. Got a neighbor, or kid who can help?
__________________
Marsha

“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.”
― Neil deGrasse Tyson

#metoo

“When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time”. Maya Angelou
ginger2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2018   #3
SueCT
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,034
Default

Also information about the variety might help. Some varieties have whispy type leaves and tend to look droopy compared to other varieties.
SueCT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2018   #4
Ed of Somis
Tomatovillian™
 
Ed of Somis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Somis, Ca
Posts: 649
Default

I do have several varieties affected (including Big Beef, Cherokee Purple, etc). It is looking more and more like what folks here describe as "shoestring" leaf growth.
Ed of Somis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2018   #5
JoParrott
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Richland,WA
Posts: 456
Default

Could be herbicide damage---
JoParrott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2018   #6
MissS
Tomatovillian™
 
MissS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Pewaukee, Wisconsin
Posts: 2,900
Default

Yes it might be herbicide damage. Have you or your neighbors sprayed your lawns and yards with anything recently?

You can check these photos and see if it helps. https://www.google.com/search?source....0.fPxZCawXFJ4
__________________
~ Patti ~
AKA - Hooper
Zone 5
MissS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #7
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,099
Default

Is your pH in normal range? Microelements are usually responsible for this sort of problems (and many of them are less available at high pH or high P application). I had narrow leaves, I had suddenly bent down leaves, and other things, it was all deficiencies or toxicities. Unfortunately I can't pinpoint the exact culprit, since I don't have leaf analysis, but copper was probably involved somewhere.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #8
Ed of Somis
Tomatovillian™
 
Ed of Somis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Somis, Ca
Posts: 649
Default

I say thanks to all for the help. I am now thinking that it is indeed herbicide (roundup) damage. I sprayed in the area...making sure there was no breeze. Maybe that was not enough caution. I think I just learned that tomatoes are hyper-sensitive to herbicides. The damage does resemble CMV...but I will pull the plants and replace.
Ed of Somis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #9
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 6,467
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed of Somis View Post
I say thanks to all for the help. I am now thinking that it is indeed herbicide (roundup) damage. I sprayed in the area...making sure there was no breeze. Maybe that was not enough caution. I think I just learned that tomatoes are hyper-sensitive to herbicides. The damage does resemble CMV...but I will pull the plants and replace.
Ed, that doesn’t sound like roundup damage. It could however be very mild 2-4-D damage. You get leaf browning from roundup and if enough gets on the plant the whole plant will die. I have had both in the past and the 2-4-D is much more frustrating because it takes so long to tell if the plants will survive. I think it would take a fairly heavy drift of roundup to kill tomatoes but very little 2-4-D to do irreparable harm. If your leaves look like the examples MissS posted, particularly the upper left one, it would probably be better to pull it and plant again rather than wait and hope for a recovery. When I had 2-4-D exposure it took a long time for some to recover and some never did.

Without good pictures it is impossible to know what you are dealing with.

Bill
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #10
Ed of Somis
Tomatovillian™
 
Ed of Somis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Somis, Ca
Posts: 649
Default

Bill,
I am not sure what products have 2-4-d...but I do not think that has been sprayed in the area. Some of the "sword-like" leaves are towards the top...and some leaves display the "clubhead" look, also. I thought I saw "glysophate damaged" tomato pics online...and they displayed the sword-like (shoestring) look. I guess I should pull them. update: I see 2-4-d is in the weed n' feed products. I did not use that around tomatoes....just roundup.

Last edited by Ed of Somis; May 4, 2018 at 12:10 PM.
Ed of Somis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #11
Ed of Somis
Tomatovillian™
 
Ed of Somis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Somis, Ca
Posts: 649
Default new pics! I think...

sword-like growth lower left and upper center


Attached Images
File Type: jpg 100_3610.jpg (665.9 KB, 82 views)
File Type: jpg 100_3609.jpg (754.7 KB, 70 views)
Ed of Somis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #12
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 6,467
Default

Ed that looks like 2-4-D herbicide damage to me. Since the plants are so small I would pull them and start new ones. I made the mistake of leaving mine and waiting for them to outgrow the problem but the ones that did recover took so long I would have been much better off to replant and they were much larger plants than yours. The 2-4-D doesn't have to be sprayed near you for it to affect your tomatoes. All it has to do is drift in with the wind and it doesn't take much.

I have already sprayed Roundup between my tomato beds twice in the last 6 weeks and it was a bit risky as it was fairly windy when I did it but I kept the sprayer on a more coarse setting with lower pressure to reduce drift and would pause spraying when the wind gusted. I have damaged enough tomatoes and other plants with careless use of Roundup and it never looked like what your plants look like in those pictures.

There is the possibility that you got the 2-4-D in your soil from some organic source like manure. I have a friend that was an organic grower who ruined a section of his garden for beans and tomatoes because of contaminated manure. 2-4-D is sprayed on a lot of pastures and can survive through the cow and be in the manure in high enough concentrations to cause problems.

There might be other explanations for the stunted growth but I don't know what they could be. Maybe someone else has seen this kind of leaf stunting from something else and could chime in.

Bill
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #13
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,099
Default

Yeah, that looks a lot like herbicide. In that case best to cut that growth and wait for new normal one to appear.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #14
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 6,467
Default

I forgot to mention in my last post that your plants are not showing as severe symptoms as mine did so they might recover faster than mine did. But like I said your plants are younger than mine were when they got it and may recover faster or slower. I just don't know.

Bill
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2018   #15
Ed of Somis
Tomatovillian™
 
Ed of Somis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Somis, Ca
Posts: 649
Default

I took out the 3 damaged maters...and replaced them with extra grow-outs that I saved. Last year I had CMV...and it looked similar, but more severe. I have a lot of different scenarios going...in ground maters, maters in new potting soil, and maters in old re-used potting soil. Next year I will not re-use any of that old potting soil. It is hard to nail it down, really. Thanks for your help! Ed
Ed of Somis is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:34 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★