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Old June 4, 2018   #16
Labradors2
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Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
So far Linda you are the only one not a fan of JF, but that doesn't surprise me at all.

Not everyone tastes the same variety the same way, the tastes of variety can differ from one year to another based on many variables that occur in the summer it was grown.

Maybe try it another year since many here do like it.

Just a modest suggestion.

Carolyn
Thanks for the suggestion Carolyn, but I'd rather stick to varieties that taste good (to me) EVERY year .

Life's too short to waste time growing tomatoes that don't taste fabulous (to me).

My keepers would be:

Anna Russian
Blush
Bulgarian Triumph
Indian Stripe
Little Lucky
Lithium Sunset
Maglia Rosa
Margaret Curtain
Pruden's Purple
Rose
my Early Annie cross

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Old June 4, 2018   #17
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Dotson's Lebanese Heart (good fried greens)

Hardin's Miniature (A tasty true mini grows & produces inside or out)

Post Office Spoonful (People who've tasted them request them)
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Old June 4, 2018   #18
carolyn137
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Keeper tomatoes?

It changes for me almost every year since new ones will replace some on my original list.

Those who have been here quite a few years will remember when I was asked to list my all time best 5 or 10 or 20 tomato varieties and my response was always the same,new ones grown often mean deleting previous ones on my list.

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Old June 4, 2018   #19
b54red
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Keeper tomatoes?

It changes for me almost every year since new ones will replace some on my original list.

Those who have been here quite a few years will remember when I was asked to list my all time best 5 or 10 or 20 tomato varieties and my response was always the same,new ones grown often mean deleting previous ones on my list.

Carolyn
I couldn't agree more. I used to have at least 50 varieties that I planted every season but as my taste got more selective I kept removing some of my old favorites until I am down to around 20 that are on my must grow list and I doubt any of them will ever be removed. I still try a few new ones and bring back some of my old ones each year just to see if I made a mistake in removing them. Taste is my number one consideration followed by how well a particular variety takes to our very hot and humid conditions. Production is probably last on my list because I try to plant a lot of tomatoes but there are limits. I don't want any tomatoes that produce loads of very small fruit or that produce only 3 or 4 in an entire season year after year.

The list below is from memory and as I am getting to that point where it isn't as dependable as it once was I may have left off a few of my must plant tomatoes.

Brandywine Cowlick's
Bradywine Sudduth's
Pruden's Purple
Giant Belgium
Aunt Ginny's Purple
Dester
Neves Azorean Red
Indian Stripe PL
Indian Stripe
JD's Special C Tex
Spudakee
Delicious
Limbaugh"s Legacy
Stump of the World
Red Barn
Marianna's Peace
Henderson's Winsall ( added to the list 4 years ago)
Kentucky Wonder (added last year)
1884 (added two years ago)
Granny Cantrell (added 3 years ago)
Donskoi
German Johnson
Arkansas Traveler
Couilles de Taureau

Since I usually plant between 30 and 45 different varieties most years there are a few others that almost always get a planting, a few old ones I used to plant and any new ones I want to try. It would be a lot simpler if I could get it down to only 10 or so but I just can't. Still it is better than when I used to plant nearly 100 different varieties over the course of each season. This way there are not nearly as many disappointments. After a few years of planting so many different varieties each year where at least 75% were not what I was looking for I started seriously culling out varieties. Eventually I got even more picky and started culling out decent but not great varieties and it is a lot easier deciding what to plant now. If I hear about a tomato that a lot of members talk highly of I will give it a try or two.

Bill
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Old June 4, 2018   #20
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Post Office Spoonful (People who've tasted them request them)
Nan
This is true! I was going to pull up your original Post Office Spoonful thread and append comments, but now's my chance to do it here. Last year an extra seedling (along with others) ended up with one of my sister's friends. The man and his family raved to her about how that was the best tasting tomato they had ever eaten! He was really disappointed when she told him that it wasn't in my cherry rotation this year. I only grow 7 cherry plants, most of them new each year except for Sungold. I may have to start a couple just for him next year.
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Old June 4, 2018   #21
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This is true! I was going to pull up your original Post Office Spoonful thread and append comments, but now's my chance to do it here. Last year an extra seedling (along with others) ended up with one of my sister's friends. The man and his family raved to her about how that was the best tasting tomato they had ever eaten! He was really disappointed when she told him that it wasn't in my cherry rotation this year. I only grow 7 cherry plants, most of them new each year except for Sungold. I may have to start a couple just for him next year.
I may have mentioned on another thread, but after having zero germination from the remaining original seeds that Nan sent me, I found a little volunteer that popped up in the yard soil adjacent to where P.O.S. grew last year. I put the little feller in a pot, and he's growing like gangbusters. I would say P.O.S. is a must grow for me too....
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Old June 5, 2018   #22
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Well Neves Azorean Red has already proved itself this year. I only have one plant so far but since the 25th of May I have picked 18 ripe fruit from it. I got 9 well blushed ones today. Neves has not done that good in several years and with a lot more fruit on the plant it should be one of my top producers this year.

I just got through picking and wow were the plants putting out the fruit today. It was very hot here yesterday and the day before and they are ripening fast now. I have almost filled my ripening table on the porch and have been giving away a lot and eating a lot. I doubt I will have another day with as many fruits ready to pick as I had today so things should slow down a bit. With the amount of new tomatoes from mid plant up things will really slow down. We better put up some sauce this week.

Bill
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Old June 5, 2018   #23
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Well Neves Azorean Red has already proved itself this year. I only have one plant so far but since the 25th of May I have picked 18 ripe fruit from it. I got 9 well blushed ones today. Neves has not done that good in several years and with a lot more fruit on the plant it should be one of my top producers this year.

I just got through picking and wow were the plants putting out the fruit today. It was very hot here yesterday and the day before and they are ripening fast now. I have almost filled my ripening table on the porch and have been giving away a lot and eating a lot. I doubt I will have another day with as many fruits ready to pick as I had today so things should slow down a bit. With the amount of new tomatoes from mid plant up things will really slow down. We better put up some sauce this week.

Bill

How do you like the flavor or NAR, I love them.

Worth
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Old June 6, 2018   #24
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How do you like the flavor or NAR, I love them.

Worth
Worth I am at the point in my life that if I don't love a tomato then I just don't grow it anymore. I sampled hundreds of different varieties over the years and came to realize that it was just too much work to take care of a tomato I didn't even want to eat. I have been growing Neves every year for about 10 years and it is a favorite of mine not just for the flavor but because I never know from year to year how it will do. Some years it will make really big tomatoes but not set too many fruits and other years it will set tons of fruit with lots of medium tomatoes and I am still trying to figure out what makes it do that. This year may be the best year ever for NAR because it is making a few really big ones and lots of med/lg ones. It is also one of those tomatoes that can take the southern heat where lots of the large beefsteaks do poorly as the real summer heat gets here. I set out some more plants in the middle of May and NAR was among them because most years it will still produce some good fruit despite the 90+ temps of mid and late summer.

Bill
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Old June 6, 2018   #25
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Worth I am at the point in my life that if I don't love a tomato then I just don't grow it anymore. I sampled hundreds of different varieties over the years and came to realize that it was just too much work to take care of a tomato I didn't even want to eat. I have been growing Neves every year for about 10 years and it is a favorite of mine not just for the flavor but because I never know from year to year how it will do. Some years it will make really big tomatoes but not set too many fruits and other years it will set tons of fruit with lots of medium tomatoes and I am still trying to figure out what makes it do that. This year may be the best year ever for NAR because it is making a few really big ones and lots of med/lg ones. It is also one of those tomatoes that can take the southern heat where lots of the large beefsteaks do poorly as the real summer heat gets here. I set out some more plants in the middle of May and NAR was among them because most years it will still produce some good fruit despite the 90+ temps of mid and late summer.

Bill
It is one of the few that I have grown that put vines and fruit out that were so long no one would believe it.
And all with no diseases.
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Old June 6, 2018   #26
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It is one of the few that I have grown that put vines and fruit out that were so long no one would believe it.
And all with no diseases.
The first year that I did lean and lower I allowed my first bed set out in March to keep going until they all died. NAR didn't die until the freeze killed it near the end of November. At that time the vine was over 25 feet long and it looked like a giant long dead stick laying on top of the mulch for about 15 feet before you saw any green in the stem yet it had new fruit on it when it was killed.

Bill
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Old June 7, 2018   #27
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It is one of the few that I have grown that put vines and fruit out that were so long no one would believe it.
And all with no diseases.
Yep, that's what I was going to point out: NAR is one of the few varieties I have grown that definitely has some Verticillium Wilt resistance. No one owns the rights to it, so we probably won't ever see a "VNTC" next to the name, but I believe it has the V resistance.
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Old June 7, 2018   #28
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Yep, that's what I was going to point out: NAR is one of the few varieties I have grown that definitely has some Verticillium Wilt resistance. No one owns the rights to it, so we probably won't ever see a "VNTC" next to the name, but I believe it has the V resistance.
It showed some resistance to fusarium wilt. I never had NAR get bacterial wilt; but that was probably just luck.

Bill
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Old June 7, 2018   #29
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It's been 15 days since I planted out. Everybody looks good, A few standouts so far worth mentioning are:

Crnkovic Yugoslavian
Mat-Su Express
Barlow Jap
Momotaro
Missouri Pink Love Apple

Crnkovic is twice as big everybody, and has set fruit already! I've never seen that 2 weeks after planting, though it was unusually warm here at the end of May.
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Old June 7, 2018   #30
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Considering the original source of NAR it doesn't surprise me much at all that it might have some disease tolerances.

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Neves_Azorean_Red

The Azores comprise several islands we don't know which island it came from, Anthony Neves never told that to the man at Neptune's Harvest CO.But most of the islands were first settled by the Portuguese and at one time Portugal and Spain were one country, and it was the Spanish who brought back seeds from the new world and there are now about,I think 15 species known, all originated in South America.

And many of those species DID have some genes related to some diseases as has subsequently been proven by DNA analyses.

So when brought to Spain and Portugal there will one find the greatest diversity of tomato varieties, as those of us know already b/c some have been getting seeds from there for a very long time.Diversity b/c of spontaneous mutations and accidental crossing.

Baikal,Island of Mallorca

Ilex, Paco, from N Spain

And now Nicolas who spoke for Baikal before since Baikal wasn't very good with English.

And there was a woman,whose name I can't remember who lived on the border between France and Spain and she was considered an authority on Spanish varieties, but I was then told she got very ill and I think she passed away.

And as the years went on there were some in Spain especially who were able to get seeds from the Spanish seed bank.

All to say that I like NAR very much and am so glad I was lucky to find it and make it better known.

Carolyn
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