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Old May 27, 2018   #1
Nan_PA_6b
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Default Sprout & Bolt

I've discovered the new Sprout-N-Bolt line of veggies. Notably, my bok choi and spinach. This is the second year for Bok Choi bolting before it was big enough to harvest. I made sure to buy Bok Choi that said it was slow to bolt. Any suggestions?



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Old May 27, 2018   #2
Hairy Moose Knuckles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nan_PA_6b View Post
I've discovered the new Sprout-N-Bolt line of veggies. Notably, my bok choi and spinach. This is the second year for Bok Choi bolting before it was big enough to harvest. I made sure to buy Bok Choi that said it was slow to bolt. Any suggestions?



Nan


Nan,

You might try a fall grow out. I saved my Bok Choi for this fall. In fact, I saved back a number of varieties to grow this fall. Of course my growing season is different from yours, so I'm not sure it would work for you, but just something to ponder.

Last edited by Hairy Moose Knuckles; May 27, 2018 at 12:36 AM.
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Old May 27, 2018   #3
AlittleSalt
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Nan, I'm not sure if I've ever eaten bok choy - much less grown it

When I grew greens, I looked for varieties that were slow to bolt. I wish I could help you, but all I can do is search for it online.
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Old May 27, 2018   #4
Nan_PA_6b
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I could try it in the fall. I wonder how long before Last Frost date to plant?


I like Bok Choi for many reasons; one is that it doesn't need much sun.


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Old May 27, 2018   #5
PhilaGardener
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The temp swings in the Spring seem too wide in most years for me to get these through. Some of the hybrid Bok Choi are supposed to be more tolerant than OP varieties.



I have tried Fall sowing after the heat breaks but generally run out of time before a hard freeze. If you have a tall cold frame that might be ideal.
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Old May 27, 2018   #6
bower
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Bok Choy has got to be THE worst vegetable for bolting at the drop of a hat (okay I forgot, Napa cabbage is the same family and even worse). Even if they grow to maturity properly there is a very small window between harvest time and oops time.
They did great for me indoors this year. In the past I've had them bolt while still small.
So what are the conditions that keep them from bolting the best?
- don't let them dry out, water daily
- don't crowd them, give them their 8 inches of space or individual pots.
- a shot of N ferts eg fish emulsion is the booster they need for vegetative growth after a few weeks.
- moderate temperatures, especially not too hot.
- don't like more than 12 hours direct light per day. Six is enough. (I read this online this year, and maybe what made the difference. Usually I'm lazy and just turn lights on when I get up/off when I go to bed so everything gets 16 hrs most of the time.)

Even when all these conditions are fulfilled they won't hold for long once they reach maturity it is bolt time pronto! I have heard that the hybrids are better for that, too.

Nan you should try Yu Choy Sum, a complete reversal of these issues:
- they like to be crowded and
- when they bolt, they're ready to harvest
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Old May 27, 2018   #7
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Not one person has mentioned the fact that these types of plants are photosensitive.
And it isn't the daylight hours that cause it, it is the darkness or lack of the does it.

Up north you are running a race with growth vs time.
More so than folks in the south because each day gains more daylight and less darkness per day the farther you are away from the equator.

Bok Choy is most commonly grown in southern China far south of where many people try to grow it in the US.

So not only are you battling heat your are battling hours of daylight more specifically hours of darkness.
You might consider growing in the fall as suggested due to the fact that it is winter hardy and you wont be racing time because the hours of darkness are getting longer not shorter.
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Old May 27, 2018   #8
Nan_PA_6b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bower View Post
Nan you should try Yu Choy Sum, a complete reversal of these issues:
- they like to be crowded and
- when they bolt, they're ready to harvest

That sounds foolproof!



Hubby loves Bok choi so I may try planting late summer.



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