Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old November 11, 2019   #1
TomatoDon
Tomatovillian™
 
TomatoDon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: MS
Posts: 1,480
Default Blossom End Rot Application

I know this is old hat to practically everyone here, but I like to review the crop at year's end and see what I learned. This year my main problem was deer and coons, which is a totally different topic.

For now, I'd like to get an idea of what the growers here used to prevent blossom end rot. I know it has to do with water uptake, or lack thereof, etc. but I want to see what commercial products were used on a larger scale for blossom end rot. Such as, liquid through a drip line or dry amendments in the planting hole, or as a later side dressing, foliar spray, etc.

I know about the egg shells and tums and even Epsom salts (which I am becoming wary of) on a small scale, so I'm interested to learn what people use who grow a lot of tomatoes, such as 100, 500, 1,000 and more. I want to see if there are any new commercial products that can be bought in bulk other than the ones most of us have used in the past. I remember that Algo-Flash used to have a good line of products and one I used was called Cal-Mag, which seemed to work well.
Thanks
Don
__________________
Zone 7B, N. MS
TomatoDon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11, 2019   #2
arnorrian
Tomatovillian™
 
arnorrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Serbia
Posts: 199
Default

I had terrible BER this year, but only on a single variety, black plum. Nothing helped. I sprayed it and watered it with Ca foliar fertilizer, added chalk around the roots, ant nothing. No other variety had any problem.
arnorrian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11, 2019   #3
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,446
Default

Most people on a large scale use calcium nitrate, in drip (mostly as a feed, not only when ber occurs). Of course, drip itself is basically anti-ber, but when it's really hot there can still be problems.

There are many products for spraying in Europe. From them, Myr-calcium seems in theory as a good one, it's calcium complex-ed with aminoacids and it's a modern product. I have not used it, it's quite expensive.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11, 2019   #4
slugworth
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: connecticut,usa
Posts: 987
Default

If I have BER it is usually on the plum type tomatoes and the round ones are fine.
This year it was just the opposite,varieties that have both types of tomatoes;the
round ones got BER and the plum type were fine.That is on the same plant.
Plants that I had growing in cement blocks did fine until the heatwave hit.
Calcium leeched from the cement maybe.
slugworth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11, 2019   #5
arnorrian
Tomatovillian™
 
arnorrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Serbia
Posts: 199
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zipcode View Post
Most people on a large scale use calcium nitrate, in drip (mostly as a feed, not only when ber occurs). Of course, drip itself is basically anti-ber, but when it's really hot there can still be problems.

There are many products for spraying in Europe. From them, Myr-calcium seems in theory as a good one, it's calcium complex-ed with aminoacids and it's a modern product. I have not used it, it's quite expensive.
I use Wuxal Super until the first fruits start forming, then switch to Wuxal Calcium. Not too expensive. At the start of the season I add some cattle chalk to the soil.
arnorrian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11, 2019   #6
GoDawgs
Tomatovillian™
 
GoDawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Augusta area, Georgia, 8a/7b
Posts: 1,485
Default

I use the plain old Stop Rot (or equivalent) calcium as a foliar spray. Two applications a few weeks apart work for my 'maters.
GoDawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11, 2019   #7
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,944
Default

BER can be caused by uneven watering and drying out of the media to a point where the plant wilts. This causes a physiological disorder with the uptake of Calcium. Nothing can help until the plant repairs itself. Adjust watering.
BER can be caused by lack of Calcium- Add Calcium Nitrate, a hobby substitute is Cal-Mag, which also has Magnesium Sulfate which is central to the Chlorophyll molecule.

Ber can also be induced by too high of an antagonist such as Potassium. Here you adjust ratios of elements. This would be rare in dirt farming, but is common in constant feed systems.

Good luck
AKmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:53 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★