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Old February 14, 2018   #61
Nan_PA_6b
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I'm growing

Doe Hill Yellow sweet pepper.

Nan
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Old February 15, 2018   #62
Andrey_BY
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I have Somborka too, but prefer sweet peppers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by velikipop View Post
That is fantastic Andrey. The more people we can share some of these great varieties with the better. I also love Somborka, a medium sized, mildly spicey yellow pepper great for stuffing with cheese.

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Old February 18, 2018   #63
Raiquee
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I'm growing

Lady Bell pepper
Toro Di Corno
Serrano
Long Cayenne
Jumbo Jalepeno
Red Habenero
Some of Craig's project peppers:
Chocolate bell
Fire Opal
Royal Purple
White Gold

Replanting: Wisconsin Lakes cause none came up...
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Old February 18, 2018   #64
Tiny Tim
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Jungle Parrot
Sweet Pickle
Pepperoncini Orange
Jalapeno Gigantia
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Old February 19, 2018   #65
IMMAAT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmsieglaff View Post
Do any of you huge pepper list growers make your own hot sauce? Any tricks or tips should I ever want to try it?
I am not a huge pepper list grower but the following base recipe which I have been making for the last decade and more keeps well(two years or longer) in a cool dark pantry. It does seem to reduce in heat over time.
Ingredients 250 grams fresh chillies,3 cups white vinegar,250grams sultanas,2tablespoons finely grated fresh ginger,4 cloves garlic peeled and grated,3 teaspoons salt, and 3 cups white sugar.
Method Put all ingredients in saucepan except sugar and simmer until sultanas are soft. Add sugar and stir until dissolved for another 15-20 minutes longer and puree in blender.
I then force through commercial sieve about 1/16 inch hole size and bottle into sterilised bottles.
I use all varieties of chillies. habernero, thai multi-colour, caroline reaper, cayenne, and others that I might be growing at the time. I grow Annaheim and use this to blend at different percentages with ultra hot varieties.
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Old February 19, 2018   #66
Goodloe
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I help supply a friend who does make hot sauce. I make "pepper sauce", probably more accurately described as "pepper vinegar". We pour it on turnip/collard greens, beans, peas, etc...also eat the pickled peppers! That's why I grow so many varieties...I like the different shapes and colors in my pepper sauce...makes for a purty jar!
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Old February 19, 2018   #67
bad.kelpie
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Trying Corbaci this year for a sweet pepper, looked interesting.
Cayenne, because I like them
And Habanero, because i think they'll sell at the farmers market
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Old February 19, 2018   #68
pmcgrady
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bad.kelpie View Post
Trying Corbaci this year for a sweet pepper, looked interesting.
Cayenne, because I like them
And Habanero, because i think they'll sell at the farmers market
I grew Corbaci last year, supposed to be super productive, they weren't...
I'm trying 3 more plants this year...
Started a lot of hots and super hots recently... Pink Habenero was the germination early winner, Big Jim is second, Big Jim Lumbre 3rd.
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Old February 19, 2018   #69
pmcgrady
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IMMAAT View Post
I am not a huge pepper list grower but the following base recipe which I have been making for the last decade and more keeps well(two years or longer) in a cool dark pantry. It does seem to reduce in heat over time.
Ingredients 250 grams fresh chillies,3 cups white vinegar,250grams sultanas,2tablespoons finely grated fresh ginger,4 cloves garlic peeled and grated,3 teaspoons salt, and 3 cups white sugar.
Method Put all ingredients in saucepan except sugar and simmer until sultanas are soft. Add sugar and stir until dissolved for another 15-20 minutes longer and puree in blender.
I then force through commercial sieve about 1/16 inch hole size and bottle into sterilised bottles.
I use all varieties of chillies. habernero, thai multi-colour, caroline reaper, cayenne, and others that I might be growing at the time. I grow Annaheim and use this to blend at different percentages with ultra hot varieties.
Some people have had luck making fermented hot sauce lately, done in crocks, oak barrels, pickle pipes or easy fermenters.. I'm going to go big on hot sauce this year, and give this recipe a try, it looks good!
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Old February 19, 2018   #70
rhines81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodloe View Post
I help supply a friend who does make hot sauce. I make "pepper sauce", probably more accurately described as "pepper vinegar". We pour it on turnip/collard greens, beans, peas, etc...also eat the pickled peppers! That's why I grow so many varieties...I like the different shapes and colors in my pepper sauce...makes for a purty jar!
Do you mean pepper relish? I think of sauce as smooth, pureed and without chunks.
A friend of mine used to make pepper relish and I always tried, without luck, to get his recipe. One particular year he nailed it, best ever, lots of heat but also tons of flavor. I think I ate most of the pint jar with chips in one sitting. It has been several years since I have been given another jar ... maybe I should play around to see what I can come up with.
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Old February 19, 2018   #71
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For hot sauce, this is my go to recipe. I usually only use one type of pepper for each batch since I like to have the flavor of the individual peppers. I've made it with everything from Jalapeños to Aji Limons, and even with lightly smoked peppers --

Master Hot Sauce Recipe

3/4 pound stemmed fresh chiles (such as jalapeño, serrano, Fresno, or habanero; use one variety or mix and match)
1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 1/8 cups distilled white vinegar

Variations:
3/4 -1 1/2 minced garlic cloves
Pinch of cumin

Pulse chiles and kosher salt in a food processor until a coarse purée forms. Transfer to a 1-qt. glass jar, loosely screw on lid, and let stand at room temperature for 12 hours to ferment slightly (I let it go for longer, 1-2 days).

Stir in vinegar and loosely screw on lid. Let chile mixture stand at room temperature for at least 1 day and up to 7 days. (Taste it daily; the longer it sits, the deeper the flavor becomes.)

Purée mixture (with garlic and cumin, if using) in a food processor or blender until smooth, about 1 minute. Place a fine-mesh sieve inside a funnel. Strain mixture through sieve into a clean glass bottle. (Hot sauce will become thinner and may separate after you strain it; shake vigorously before each use.)
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Old February 22, 2018   #72
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Looks like aji amarello pepper is popular, I'll have to try that one.

I'm growing:
Brazilian starfish
Jalapeño
Mustard habanero
Bell pepper color mix
Corbaci (disappointed to hear of its low yield! That's why I picked it!)
Criollo de Cocina
Jimmy nardello
Lipstick
Paradicsom aluka sarga szentes
Pepperoncini

And last but not least my best pepper of 10 years... red Belgian.

Lindsey
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Old February 27, 2018   #73
roper2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linzelu100 View Post
Looks like aji amarello pepper is popular, I'll have to try that one.

I'm growing:
Brazilian starfish
Jalapeño
Mustard habanero
Bell pepper color mix
Corbaci (disappointed to hear of its low yield! That's why I picked it!)
Criollo de Cocina
Jimmy nardello
Lipstick
Paradicsom aluka sarga szentes
Pepperoncini

And last but not least my best pepper of 10 years... red Belgian.

Lindsey
Looks like Brazilian Starfish is a popular one too. I started my Aji Amarillo very early
because I have read that they take awhile to ripen. I was watching an Aji Amarillo grow down
contest and their peppers were taking a long time to turn orange, so I started mine January 9th.
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Old February 27, 2018   #74
Worth1
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Ghost peppers my try my luck at giant bells again.
Worth
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Old February 27, 2018   #75
fonseca
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Wow, 23,000 new posts since my last login.

Lots of interesting pepper varieties in this thread. I had to share my list for 2018, especially after seeing so many people growing my favorite Aji Amarillo!

Sweet:
-Doe Hill (SESE)
-Paradicsom Alaku Saga Szentes (Baker Creek)
-Antohi Romanian (Johnny's Seeds)
-Habanada (Baker Creek)

Hot:
-Aji Amarillo (Trade Winds Fruit)
-Aji Chinchi Amarillo (SESE)
-Tams Mild Jalapeno (Baker Creek)
-Joe's Long Cayenne (Johnny's Seeds)
-Thai "Ambassador" (Saved seed, likely misnamed, tiny and potent)
-Caballo (Baker Creek, Rocoto multicolor)

Savory:
-Trinidad Perfume (Plant from nctomatoman years ago, still growing true)
-Datil Sweet (Trade Winds Fruit, these can turn hot)

Aji Amarillo plants get huge, and the peppers can reach 6"+ long easily. But they are an extremely long season plant, and I have yet to get fully-ripe orange peppers, more like green-orange. Which is why I have high expectations for the Aji Chinchi Amarillo. Hopefully, their small size will mean earlier ripening.

I had several dozen pepper plants 2-3 years old that were overwintering in the greenhouse, but we had some freak cold weather this year with lows in the single digits, and even in the greenhouse with additional covering and insulation, they had no chance.

This is my first year growing Habanada. I hope it lives up to the hype. If so, it will be the base for several gallons of lacto-fermented hot sauce.

The attached photo is as (un)ripe as the standard Amarillo usually gets for me in central NC. Still delicious, but I want to see some orange.I'm going to try overwintering plants again for an earlier start in 2019.
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File Type: jpg Amarillo.jpg (140.4 KB, 74 views)
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