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Old June 12, 2023   #1
montyb
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Default The Mystery Tree

We've moved into this house and it's the first year we've seen what's what in the garden. This tree had white blossoms all over it and it's in the back yard. There are 2 crabapples in the front yard. Does anyone have any experience in identifying what this is? A normal apple or a crabapple or something totally different? I'll see if I can find the photo I have of the blossoms on the tree and post them too if it will help. Thanks
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Old June 13, 2023   #2
VirginiaClay
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It kind of looks like pear leaves and fruit to me, but it's hard to tell. Maybe some kind of crabapple or serviceberry. Likely something in the rose family, at any rate. Can you post a higher-resolution image, one that can be clicked on for more detail? Photos of blossoms, whole tree (for shape), trunk/bark, leaf detail all would be helpful.
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Old June 14, 2023   #3
rxkeith
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my guess is pear.
leaves are smooth, and shiny. service berry is a different shape, and darker green.
apple leaf is different. lets us know how it turns out.
if you have a near by neighbor, like right next door, try asking them.






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Old June 14, 2023   #4
VirginiaClay
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Here are some stock images of pear foliage and fruit at about the same stage as your tree: Pear foliage stock images
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Old June 25, 2023   #5
montyb
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Thanks. Sorry I haven't replied sooner but family stuff going on. I'm a terrible photographer but I'll try and get a better photo.
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Old June 25, 2023   #6
JRinPA
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I think pear, I can post pics but by now you should be able to tell probably.
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Old June 25, 2023   #7
JRinPA
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May 1 of 2018, 2018 was a bumper crop year. Still finding a few dark pear sauce from then and still really sweet and tasty. Last year's doesn't compare. This is an old tree, early 60s.
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Old July 1, 2023   #8
montyb
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IMG_0823.jpg

IMG_0822.jpg

Sorry it took a while. Hope they are clear enough I'm a terrible photographer as I say lol.
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Old July 1, 2023   #9
JRinPA
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It looks like some type of pear to me, but, I only have this tree to compare it.

Here are pics from today. I'm at 40 deg latitude and the flowers came on early this year and were through that tender stage before the late May 17th frost. But it was not a heavy flowering like some years.

I tried to classify this tree a few years back and decided on d'Anjou. Regular, not Red Anjou. Previous to that, a local cider mill employee thought maybe it was a Clapp's Favorite. I just know the tree was put in by the original homeowners that were Greek or close to it, and they had a lot of Med crops here that were overwintered in the basement.


I should be thinning them out to 1 or 2 pears per node, but this tree is big and I can only reach the lowest branches without a ladder, and a ladder won't work too well with the leaves and fruit on. So instead we get some pears every year, and a big crop every second or third year depending on the weather.
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Old August 21, 2023   #10
MrsJustice
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It looks like a "Bosc Pear Tree" that is good for Pies & Baking. Some people call them Winter Pears.
I have one too that is growing out of control with thousands of pears. I cooked the Pears with all my Vegetable dishes. Today my husband Loved the way I cooked in the oven with his baked beans & Cut Beef.
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Old August 23, 2023   #11
JRinPA
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montyb any fresh pictures?


Our d'anjou has a huge crop again this year. I just steamed a pot this evening, gotta mill it and can it yet.
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