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Old March 28, 2014   #1
harleysilo
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Default Edamame (Soy beans) thoughts?

My wife wants us to grow some edamame this year. I'm looking for seeds online, and can find them but am having difficulty finding a small amount of this inoculate (from the same seller) i'm supposed to put on the seeds since i've never grown soy beans in my garden before. Do i really need to do the inoculation step?

Seems like those that sell the inoculate sell large quantities of soy bean for farming or for animals, not the same seeds i think i want. I can just order from two different places i just wondering if anyone had any advice.
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Old March 28, 2014   #2
neoguy
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I planted edamame for the first time last year, bought from Johnny's Selected Seed. Didn't bother to use the inoculant. Planted the seed and they grew fine.
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Old April 13, 2014   #3
epsilon
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Kitazaw seeds has most of the Japanese varietals listed. The inoculate you can get from any hydroponics store for dirt cheap, or on Amazon.

I like beer friend and white lion. Both produced well for me in the past, and were super tasty.
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Old April 13, 2014   #4
nancyruhl
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Be aware.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...usaolp00000592
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Old April 13, 2014   #5
Durgan
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Edamame are soybeans that are harvested before they have hardened. Edamame have been used in Asian dishes for over two thousand years. Many people will eat the beans out of the pods after they have been lightly boiled.

Any soy bean not mature can be made into edamame.
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Old April 13, 2014   #6
Durgan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nancyruhl View Post
How much longer are the people going to tolerate this type of behavior by government authorities? Maybe time for the great revolution.
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Old April 13, 2014   #7
gssgarden
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I've grown them for a few years now. The kids LOVE them!

I've ordered them online before, but now the local mom and pop hardware store carries them every year!!

They take a while to grow but it's worth it as a snack or during dinner. Just love the fact that all five of us enjoy them!!

Greg
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Old April 13, 2014   #8
Vespertino
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There's a little restaurant in my old neighborhood called "Kamui Den", they served a good chawan mushi which contained very large, fresh soybeans it it- this wasn't your frozen edamame from from a bag- it was the real deal, and they were delightful. I haven't been able to eat frozen edamame since and I've been very interested in growing my own ever since, I hope to do so next year. If you grow soybeans this year you're in for a treat!

Last edited by Vespertino; April 13, 2014 at 10:38 AM.
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Old April 13, 2014   #9
Wi-sunflower
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I just hope none of you have any Thyroid issues and or hormone issues. ANY soy is a goitrogen (thyroid disruptor) and is an Estrogen source that can cause early puberty in children.

Personally I believe Soy totally messed up me during perimenopause and I'm still feeling the after-affects more than 15 years later. I won't knowingly eat soy at all any more. Yes there is a great controversy about this and you may find more pro soy than anti. I only know my own experience was very bad.

Here is a link for you to make your own decision. More links on that page.

http://thyroid.about.com/cs/soyinfo/a/soy.htm

Carol
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Old April 13, 2014   #10
Tracydr
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I love soybeans, too. Hoping I can grow them after we move. We just get too hot too fast.
How do you know which variety for which part of the country?
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Old April 13, 2014   #11
Vespertino
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Carol,

I'm really sorry that you had such a bad reaction to soybeans. And you're right, they aren't for everyone. Some can eat it without problems but others run into issues. I think it's a your-milage-may-vary thing, same goes for wheat, peanuts, dairy- everyone's stomachs and bodies are different.
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Old April 13, 2014   #12
epsilon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wi-sunflower View Post
I just hope none of you have any Thyroid issues and or hormone issues. ANY soy is a goitrogen (thyroid disruptor) and is an Estrogen source that can cause early puberty in children.

Personally I believe Soy totally messed up me during perimenopause and I'm still feelinwe cang the after-affects more than 15 years later. I won't knowingly eat soy at all any more. Yes there is a great controversy about this and you may find more pro soy than anti. I only know my own experience was very bad.

Here is a link for you to make your own decision. More links on that page.

http://thyroid.about.com/cs/soyinfo/a/soy.htm

Carol
I've heard a lot of people have had issues with soy, supposedly the phytoestrogen causes lot's of people to have all kinds of problems. Like men getting moobies and premature puberty.

I'm starting to wonder if the soybean source had anything to do with these issues. Or maybe it had something to do with the very fact that Asians have been eating soy for the last few millennia. Personally I easy it with no discernable consequence. Same with my Japanese family.

I wonder if it has something to do with most American varieties being gmo'd for pest and pesticide resistance?

Since the studies that show these issues have only been around for already ten to fifteen years tops.

Also I kinda wonder if gly phosphate can be really manufactured from soybeans.
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Old April 13, 2014   #13
Tracydr
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Could be that we have soy in so many processed foods nowadays. Too much of a good thing. I think if you don't eat a lot of processed foods and tofu a little edamame won't hurt most people.
I often recommend for women who are having menopausal symptoms and can't take hormones to eat soy, as well as evening primrose oil.
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Old April 13, 2014   #14
Vespertino
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There's a lot of genetic variance in both crops and human beings the issues may be a bit of both. Some people thrive on different diets and foods, no one is the same. Some have allergies, some don't, some have genetics that allow for digestion of certain things, other's don't- it's not so much a problem with the food being bad. Although gmo is an interesting thing, there may be something about the pesticide and disease resistance in gmo varieties that make it harder to digest. Thank goodness there's heirloom soybeans available
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Old April 13, 2014   #15
Cole_Robbie
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I have read market gardeners say that when they grew edamame as a market crop, it grew well and sold well, but they never wanted to grow it a second time because it was so difficult to pick. Maybe that would not be an issue with a small garden.
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