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Old September 26, 2019   #1
MrBig46
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Default Brassica chinense Pak Choy

What can be cooked from Pak Choy Chinese cabbage?

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Old September 26, 2019   #2
imp
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Looks like it makes a petite or smaller type plant, so you could stir fry it whole or halved in many recipes, or add the small halves or quarters to soups or stews, it can be fried like head cabbage is done too. I like the very young leaves in a salad, either a mixed greens salad or sliced crossways into a slaw type salad. It's good steamed with salt, pepper and a dab of soya sauce or oyster sauce as a side dish by it's self. I've used it for the cabbage in Bubble and Squeak, battered lightly and fired ( not so healthy, but good) and have cut it into bite sized pieces and fried with cubed potatoes. Used it raw, separating the leaves for a dipping agent in salsa to ranch as well.


A pretty versatile plant, like a mild cabbage.
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Old September 26, 2019   #3
kilroyscarnival
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It is tender and mild, like a softer sweeter version of a white cabbage, when harvested young. I use it in all kinds of improvised stir fry dishes. Two of my favorite YouTube cooks are Marion's Kitchen and Maangchi. The former is a half-Thai/half-Australian young woman (and her Thai mom) doing Thai and pan-Asian dishes. The latter is a Korean-American woman in New York. I've been learning a lot about Asian flavors and textures (my next endeavor is to make homemade Japanese udon and soba noodles) from them and others. I'm fortunate to live in a city with several large and many smaller Asian markets.
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Old September 26, 2019   #4
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Think borscht.
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Old September 26, 2019   #5
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You could always make some sauerkraut out of some of it.
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Old September 26, 2019   #6
PhilaGardener
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Nice looking plants! I use it in stir fry dishes as well.
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Old September 27, 2019   #7
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I'm glad I'm not the only one who buys seed packs I can't read!
Those are nice plants. Lots of kinds of pak choi and there are lots of good suggestions already made. I mostly stir fry mine in combination with whatever else is in the veg crisper.
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Old September 27, 2019   #8
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I forgot, sometimes I would do a quick fridge pickle with quartered bok choy and red onions.
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Old September 27, 2019   #9
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Cabbage carrots potato and onion soup.
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Old September 27, 2019   #10
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https://youtu.be/d-PY9V9kTMY
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Old September 27, 2019   #11
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https://sweetandsavorymeals.com/oven-roasted-bok-choy/
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Old September 27, 2019   #12
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We add it to soups and salads.
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Old September 27, 2019   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Think borscht.

I like borscht. I'll try.
Vladimír
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Old September 27, 2019   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nematode View Post
Thanks, it looks simple, I'll try.

Vladimír
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Old September 27, 2019   #15
MrBig46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kilroyscarnival View Post
It is tender and mild, like a softer sweeter version of a white cabbage, when harvested young. I use it in all kinds of improvised stir fry dishes. Two of my favorite YouTube cooks are Marion's Kitchen and Maangchi. The former is a half-Thai/half-Australian young woman (and her Thai mom) doing Thai and pan-Asian dishes. The latter is a Korean-American woman in New York. I've been learning a lot about Asian flavors and textures (my next endeavor is to make homemade Japanese udon and soba noodles) from them and others. I'm fortunate to live in a city with several large and many smaller Asian markets.
Can you give me links to the two chefs on YouTube? I would like to try something unusual for us Europeans. I like to taste foreign food, only the question is whether I can cook it.
Vladimír
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