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Historical background information for varieties handed down from bygone days.

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Old October 31, 2017   #1
BigVanVader
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Default Earliest known use of a potato in North America

Found this interesting.

http://www.hcn.org/articles/scientif...climate-shifts
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Old October 31, 2017   #2
Salsacharley
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Very interesting.
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Old October 31, 2017   #3
wildcat62
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Yes great article
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Old November 1, 2017   #4
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I think they had an Inca Mart® down the creek.
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Old November 1, 2017   #5
Cole_Robbie
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Here is some more information about the species of potato. The link mentions that it might make a person sick, if not appropriately prepared:

https://www.cultivariable.com/solanum-jamesii/
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Old November 1, 2017   #6
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Both articles really interesting.
I wonder if there are any mutants with lower alkaloids, since there's no chance of breeding with the cultivated potato.

I always find the pre-agriculture foods to be interesting and want to try them, but it doesn't take much experience before the superiority of cultivated types becomes really obvious - from an eating pov. The wild proto-foods have other advantages, like being perennial, or being adapted to specific environments etc. This is great if the drawbacks are really not too bad...

I have yet to find an "alternative" food that is really edible as more than a garnish.
I have a patch of sunchokes, for example - always compared to other (tasty!) foods, but in fact I doubt I could eat many of these, even if I was starving.
I have a giant lovage plant (always compared to celery - it is not!) and while I enjoy it once or twice a year it is a very strong flavored herb, not a vegetable.

Another one that tempted me, I haven't grown yet though, is the "skirret" - a perennial relative of carrot and parsnip. And still wondering if skirret is to parsnip as lovage is to celery.
https://www.restorationseeds.com/products/skirret

As "four corner" is to spuds?
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Old November 1, 2017   #7
Cole_Robbie
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There is a microbrewery near me that specializes in foraged ingredients in their beer. I've only been there once, but all of the beer that I tried is excellent. Their varieties change constantly as differently ingredients come in and out of season.

Here's their site: https://www.scratchbeer.com/
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Old November 1, 2017   #8
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I think Tom Wagner might be able to help here since he breeds not just tomatoes,but also potatoes and has a good sense of history as well.

He hasn't been here lately but here's a thread where he last posted so you can PM him if any of you want to.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?p=624069

I think this link might be enven better than the one above.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Tom+...&bih=815&dpr=1


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Old November 2, 2017   #9
bower
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
There is a microbrewery near me that specializes in foraged ingredients in their beer. I've only been there once, but all of the beer that I tried is excellent. Their varieties change constantly as differently ingredients come in and out of season.

Here's their site: https://www.scratchbeer.com/
That looks pretty amazing. Chanterelles in beer. Tomatoes in beer??
I notice they use 'wild carrots' as a flavoring, among other things..... And the food looks pretty tasty too.
Of course the exotic things are flavorings. Small amounts'll do.

We tried some wild flavors back in the wine making days. Flavors really magnified in wine, no joke. Elecampane... that was pretty good. Gooseberry and yarrow, took very little yarrow to make it extremely floral - ah what hangovers we had from that one. If I ever tried that again I would use the tiniest pinch...
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